4

I was answering a Java test and come across the question:

Which of the following statements is true?

A. In an assert statement, the expression after the colon ( : ) can be any Java expression.

B. If a switch block has no default, adding an assert default is considered appropriate.

C. In an assert statement, if the expression after the colon ( : ) does not have a value, the assert's error message will be empty.

D. It is appropriate to handle assertion failures using a catch clause.

The right answer is B. To be honest, I answered that question by excluding another obviously wrong cases, but I can't get the point of that question actually. Could anyone explain why it is true? Where can it be helpful?

3 Answers 3

10

I guess it means you should protect yourself from missing a switch case.

Say you have an enum Color {red, green} and this switch in the code:

switch(color) {
   case red: 
       doSomethingRed();
       break;
   case green: 
       doSomethingGreen();
       break;
}   

If in the future you add a new color blue, you can forget to add a case for it in the switch. Adding failing assert to the default case will throw AssertionError and you will discover your mistake .

switch(color) {
   case red: 
       doSomethingRed();
       break;
   case green: 
       doSomethingGreen();
       break;
   default: 
       assert false : "Oops! Unknown color"
}   
1
  • Nice catch! Thank you
    – St.Antario
    Oct 18, 2014 at 14:51
4

This depends on the case but the way I see it

// Consider expecting only 1,2 or 3 as switch case
switch(x) 
{  
    case 1:
        // operations 
        break;  
    case 2:
        // operations 
        break;  
    case 3:
        // operations 
        break;  
    default: assert false : "Input should be between 1-3";  
}  

Might be convenient as any other input you might receive can be perceived as a faulty input.

1
  • Interesting, but we can just throw an exception to get a similiar result, can we?
    – St.Antario
    Oct 18, 2014 at 14:53
2

Using assert false in switch block's default is applicable in the public method context e.g.

public void methA(int x) throws Exception {

if(x!=1 && x!=2 && x!=3) 
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("from Exception: x should be between 1,2 and 3");

switch(x) 
{  
    case 1: doSomething(); break;  
    case 2: doSomething(); break;  
    case 3: doSomething(); break;  
    default: assert false : "from default: x should be between 1,2 and 3";  
} 
}

If the switch block is used in a public method, then checking the value of the argument x is already handled by an exception before the switch statement.

So, even when you use the assert false in default, that code is never reachable, since the assumption that x is 1,2 or 3 is always true. If not true, it is already handled by the IllegalArgumentException before the switch default. So basically, the assumption that switch-default will never be reached is always true. Hence it is appropriate in the context of public method.

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