35

I have the problem, that MSSQL Server 2000 should select some distinct values from a table (the specific column is of the nvarchar type). There are the sometimes the same values, but with different cases, for example (pseudocode):

SELECT DISTINCT * FROM ("A", "a", "b", "B")

would return

A,b

But I do want (and do expect)

A,a,b,B

because they actually are different values.

How to solve this problem?

  • 2
    What collation do you use for the column? – Rowland Shaw Apr 15 '10 at 11:40
54

The collation will be set to case insensitive.

You need to do something like this

Select distinct col1 COLLATE sql_latin1_general_cp1_cs_as
From dbo.myTable
  • 2
    I didn't know COLLATE, but that is the solution. I'll accept this one, as soon as I am allowed to (6 minutes left). Thank you! – powerbar Apr 15 '10 at 11:46
  • 4
    Dont forget to add 'as col1' in order to avoid loosing column name in result! – MKorsch Jul 3 '14 at 11:42
  • latin1_general_ci works for most Latin characters, but utf8mb4_unicode_ci, as shown by show collation should work for everything. – Cees Timmerman Oct 11 '17 at 8:20
7

Use BINARY for this operation. Cast the column to binary like so:

SELECT DISTINCT BINARY(column1) from table1;

Just change column1 and table1 as per your schema.

Full example that works for me in MySQL 5.7, should work for others:

SELECT DISTINCT BINARY(gateway) from transactions;

Cheers!

  • 1
    Much cleaner option! – brianlmerritt Jul 29 '16 at 8:25
  • This is so much better. I don't want to change the collation of every table in which I have to do a search like this. – carla Jun 26 '17 at 14:22
2
SELECT DISTINCT
   CasedTheColumn 
FROM
   (
   SELECT TheColumn COLLATE LATIN1_GENERAL_BIN AS CasedTheColumn
   FROM myTAble
   )FOO
WHERE
   CasedTheColumn IN ('A', 'a'...)
0

Try setting the collation of the column in question to something binary, e.g. utf8-bin. You can either do that in the SELECT statement itself or by changing your table structure directly (which means it doesn't have to map the collation each time the query is run, since it will store it correctly internally).

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