21

Is there a way to tell the python unittest execute all assertion in a method and show all cases it fails, instead of stop at the first failed.

class MyTestCase(TestCase):
    def test_a(self):
        with open('testcase.txt') as ifile: 
            for iline in ifile:
                self.assertEqual(iline, 'it is a test!')
3
  • 1
    I have yet to see a unit test framework that accumulates errors and reports them all. It seems that the standard is to fail on first failure.
    – TGH
    Commented Oct 20, 2014 at 4:37
  • 1
    @TGH: I have; googletest has EXPECT macros that continue on failure and ASSERT macros that abort immediately. Commented Oct 20, 2014 at 4:44
  • @user2357112 Ok interesting. I guess it makes sense since it's just a design choice made by the creator of the framework. I guess a common pattern is to throw exceptions when asserts fail, leaving it to the caller to implement their own tally of exceptions if desirable.
    – TGH
    Commented Oct 20, 2014 at 4:46

3 Answers 3

26

Python 3.4 introduced the subTest context manager. Your code will look like

class MyTestCase(TestCase):
    def test_a(self):
        with open('testcase.txt') as ifile: 
            for iline in ifile:
                with self.subTest(line=iline):
                    self.assertEqual(iline, 'it is a test!')

The ugly way to achieve this without subTest is to make self.assert* calls within a try block, print the errors caught, and raise the AssertionError explicitly after the loop if at least one test failed.

2
  • 1
    @lucemia subTest is unarguably the easiest way to achieve what you want, but you can also use try..except in a loop to print exceptions.
    – vaultah
    Commented Oct 20, 2014 at 5:41
  • 2
    The problem with subtests is that setUp is not automatically called for each subtest, as can sometimes be necessary. It can however certainly be called manually as self.setUp() within the subtest.
    – Asclepius
    Commented May 1, 2017 at 20:14
5

Alternatively, you can make a data-driven-test with the help of ddt package:

DDT (Data-Driven Tests) allows you to multiply one test case by running it with different test data, and make it appear as multiple test cases.

import unittest
from ddt import ddt, data

@ddt
class FooTestCase(unittest.TestCase):
    @data('it is a test!', 'it is a test!', 'something else')
    def test_lines(self, value):
        self.assertEqual(value, 'it is a test!')

ddt can also have the data coming from a file, but it has to be a JSON file.

1
1

Generally no. Unit tests stop at first fail. If you want to compare all lines you need to have a local list and then put the different lines into the list. Then assert that list length is zero. Or a local boolean variable.

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