4

Is there any way to return a variable number of outputs from a mex function?

One might pack them into a cell, but I wondered wether there is a way, so that they are expanded directly in the output list. Something like

a = mymex(arg1, arg2);

[a, b, c] = mymex(arg1, arg2, 'all');
5

Of course you can, just like any other MATLAB function:

test_mex.cpp

#include "mex.h"

void mexFunction(int nlhs, mxArray *plhs[], int nrhs, const mxArray *prhs[])
{
    for (int i=0; i<nlhs; i++) {
        plhs[i] = mxCreateDoubleScalar(i);
    }
}

MATLAB

>> [a,b,c] = test_mex()
a =
     0
b =
     1
c =
     2

You will have to determine how many arguments to return depending on the inputs/outputs, or issue an error if the function is called incorrectly (not enough input, too many outputs, etc..). The example above just accepts any number of output arguments (including none or zero outputs)

Take comma separated lists, which allow use to call functions in interesting ways:

>> out = cell(1,20);
>> [out{:}] = test_mex()
out = 
  Columns 1 through 11
    [0]    [1]    [2]    [3]    [4]    [5]    [6]    [7]    [8]    [9]    [10]
  Columns 12 through 20
    [11]    [12]    [13]    [14]    [15]    [16]    [17]    [18]    [19]

This is like calling the function with 20 output variables:

>> [x1,x2,...,x20] = test_mex()

EDIT:

Just to clarify, MEX-functions act like regular M-functions defined with variable number of inputs and outputs (think function varargout = mymex(varargin)), and the same rules apply; it is up to you to manage access to inputs and create necessary outputs.

For example the previous code can be written as a regular M-function called the same way as before:

function varargout = test_fcn(varargin)
    for i=1:nargout
        varargout{i} = i-1;
    end
end

The difference is that in MEX-files you could crash MATLAB if you try to access something out-of-range, or try to write output beyond what is actually allocated.

Take this example:

#include "mex.h"
void mexFunction(int nlhs, mxArray *plhs[], int nrhs, const mxArray *prhs[])
{
    for (int i=0; i<30; i++) {    // <--- note 30 as value
        plhs[i] = mxCreateDoubleScalar(i);
    }
}

Calling the above as:

>> test_mex    % careful!

will most likely cause an immediate MATLAB crash. While the same thing done in M-code, will just create unnecessary extra output variables that are destroyed after the call.

As @chappjc explained in his answer, for MEX-files you are always guaranteed to have space for at least one output (plhs is an array of mxArray* of length 1 at a minimum, so it's safe to assign plhs[0] no matter what). If the caller specifies a LHS variable then the output goes into it, otherwise the output is assigned to the special ans variable (of course you can still assign nothing, in case of zero outputs).

The opposite case of not assigning enough output variables is fortunately caught by MATLAB, and throws a regular catch-able error with ID MATLAB:unassignedOutputs (in both MEX and M-functions).

Also, accessing out-of-range inputs will cause an access violation (MATLAB will inform you of that with a big scary dialog, and the prompt will turn to "please restart MATLAB" message). Doing the same in regular M-code, will just throw a regular error "Index exceeds matrix dimensions.", nothing serious!

As you can see, it is very easy for things to go wrong in MEX world (in an unrecoverable way), so you have to pay special attention to validating input/output arguments.

  • i'll give it a try – embert Oct 20 '14 at 9:18
  • Thanks for explanations. Seeing it in context makes things clear I guess. In a nested calling structure like when wrapping functions and passing through the in/out arguments the uppermost caller determines the nargin/nargout and this info can be passed through then and received also in a mex via nrhs/nlhs (which are equivalent to nargin/nargout). – embert Oct 22 '14 at 5:38
2

The syntax for calling a MEX function is identical to any other MATLAB function. However, internal to the MEX function, the number of in/out arguments used is determined by the first and third arguments to mexFunction (usually named nlhs and nrhs, can be anything).

Declaration of mexFunction in mex.h (around line 141 in R2014b):

/*
 * mexFunction is the user-defined C routine that is called upon invocation
 * of a MEX-function.
 */
void mexFunction(
    int           nlhs,           /* number of expected outputs */
    mxArray       *plhs[],        /* array of pointers to output arguments */
    int           nrhs,           /* number of inputs */
    const mxArray *prhs[]         /* array of pointers to input arguments */
);

This is not unlike the syntax for the standard main functions for C/C++ command line executables, but there are notable differences. Unlike the native command line version (int main(int argc, const char* argv[])), the count and pointer array does not include the name of the function (argv[0] is usually the name of the executable program file), and with mexFunction there are parameters for output arguments as well as input.

The naming for nlhs and nrhs should be clear. HINT: In mathematics, an equation has a left hand side and a right hand side.


An important but easily overlooked quality of mexFunction I/O handling pertains to MATLAB's special ans variable, the place where function outputs (often) go if you don't assign to a variable. In a MEX file, you need to remember the following when checking nlhs. If nlhs=0, you can and must still write to plhs[0] for ans to be used. It's documented, just barely, in Data Flow in MEX-Files. Consider what happens with the following code:

// test_nlhs.cpp
void mexFunction(int nlhs, mxArray *plhs[], int nrhs, const mxArray *prhs[])
{
    for (int i=0; i<nlhs; ++i)
        plhs[i] = mxCreateDoubleScalar(i);
}

Outputs:

>> test_nlhs
>> [a,b] = test_nlhs
a =
     0
b =
     1

There's no output to ans because the logic with nlhs prevents it from assigning to plhs[0]. Now this code:

// test_nlhs.cpp
void mexFunction(int nlhs, mxArray *plhs[], int nrhs, const mxArray *prhs[])
{
    if (nlhs==0) {
        mexPrintf("Returning special value to ""ans"".\n");
        plhs[0] = mxCreateDoubleScalar(-1);
    } else {
        mexPrintf("Returning to specified workspace variables.\n");
        for (int i=0; i<nlhs; ++i)
            plhs[i] = mxCreateDoubleScalar(i);
    }
}

Outputs

>> test_nlhs
Returning special value to ans.
ans =
    -1
>> [a,b] = test_nlhs
Returning to specified workspace variables.
a =
     0
b =
     1

It's certainly doesn't have to be a special value, and it should usually be the same first output argument, but I'm illustrating how you recognize the calling syntax.

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