22

Suppose I have following script:-

test.sh

#!/bin/bash
command1  #prints 5 lines
command2  #prints 3 lines

I run the script with test.sh|head -n5

What will happen in this case? Will it run both the commands? or will it stop after command1? What if I call it with -n1?

Background: I might be asking a very basic question, but I actually noticed something interesting. My script(different one) was processing 7,000 files and each file produces 1 line of output. It takes 7 minutes to run the script completely but doing head -n1 gave me prompt immediately like the script has terminated after processing first file only

Edit: Following is my script

for i in $(ls filepath);do
     echo "$i" # issue here
    python mySript "$i" > "/home/user/output/""$i"".out"
  fi
done

Removing echo above enables the script to run full 7 minute with head -n1, but with echo it just prints first line then exit.

  • It will run the command in its entirety and then simply pass the output to head. Everything seems to be working exactly as it should, i don't understand what you are asking ? – user3442743 Oct 20 '14 at 8:31
  • this seems the behavior of bash since echo is builtin command. try changing echo to /bin/echo and see what happends. – ymonad Oct 20 '14 at 8:35
  • @ymonad You are right, can you elaborate more on this behavior? – RedX Oct 20 '14 at 8:37
  • 1
    I may be wrong but as I understand it, the head process exits after it has received the number of lines you specify. When this happens, the pipe is broken, so the process on the other end of the pipe also terminates. – Tom Fenech Oct 20 '14 at 11:46
  • 1
    @MangatRai: Just to make it more clear. As You described echo is a bash builtin, SIGPIPE is sent to the bash interpreter (actually it is the writer of the pipe). Actually /bin/echo does pass the information about receiving a SIGPIPE by returning the exit code 141. The caller (here bash) can handle it on a convenient way (here it is ignored). I may suggest if one expect to print only the first few lines, but You need to run the whole script, add a command line argument to do so. – TrueY Oct 21 '14 at 7:34
17

This is a fairly interesting issue! Thanks for posting it!

I assumed that this happens as head exits after processing the first few lines, so SIGPIPE signal is sent to the running the script when it tries to echo $x next time. I used RedX's script to prove this theory:

#!/usr/bin/bash
rm x.log
for((x=0;x<5;++x)); do
    echo $x
    echo $x>>x.log
done

This works, as You described! Using t.sh|head -n 2 it writes only 2 lines to the screen and to x.log. But trapping SIGPIPE this behavior changes...

#!/usr/bin/bash
trap "echo SIGPIPE>&2" PIPE
rm x.log
for((x=0;x<5;++x)); do
    echo $x
    echo $x>>x.log
done

Output:

$ ./t.sh |head -n 2
0
1
./t.sh: line 5: echo: write error: Broken pipe
SIGPIPE
./t.sh: line 5: echo: write error: Broken pipe
SIGPIPE
./t.sh: line 5: echo: write error: Broken pipe
SIGPIPE

The write error occurs as stdout is already closed as the other end of the pipe is closed. And any attempt to write to the closed pipe causes a SIGPIPE signal, which terminates the program by default (see man 7 signal). The x.log now contains 5 lines.

This also explains why /bin/echo solved the problem. See the following script:

rm x.log
for((x=0;x<5;++x)); do
    /bin/echo $x
    echo "Ret: $?">&2
    echo $x>>x.log
done

Output:

$ ./t.sh |head -n 2
0
Ret: 0
1
Ret: 0
Ret: 141
Ret: 141
Ret: 141

Decimal 141 = hex 8D. Hex 80 means a signal was received, hex 0D is for SIGPIPE. So when /bin/echo tried to write to stdout it got a SIGPIPE and it was terminated (as default behavior) instead of the running the script.

  • Awesome explanation and the work around was pretty neat too. I can guess why bash doesn't handle such situation. It makes sense to close pipe and send SIGPIPE, otherwise processes in shell will keep running and programmers will have to handle exit scenarios in every process. Thank you so much! – Mangat Rai Modi Oct 21 '14 at 6:15
  • @MangatRai: Actually bash can handle the situation by trapping SIGPIPE. Usually closing a pipe while other process wants to write to it is an error. So the default behavior is to terminate the writer. But if the programmer knows that it is not a real error, then can take actions to solve the issue. And this situation is not for bash, but for any executable which writes to a pipe. If head is used the "pipe" can "consider" that after the first few rows it is normal to terminate the source side of the pipe. – TrueY Oct 21 '14 at 7:20
  • This is true, y? Already explained (sorry) – Nitesh Patel Jul 14 '15 at 23:26
8

Nice finding. According to my tests it's exactly like you said. For example I have this script that just eats cpu, to let us spot it in top:

for i in `seq 10`
  do echo $i
  x=`seq 10000000`
done

Piping the script with head -n1 we see the command returning after the first line. This is the head behavior: it completed its work, so it can stop and return the control to you.

The input script should continue running but look what happens: when the head returns, its pid doesn't exist anymore. So when linux tries to send the output of the script to the head process, it does not find the process, so the script crashes and stops.

Let's try it with a python script:

for i in xrange(10):
    print i
    range(10000000)

When running it and piping to head you have this:

$ python -u test.py | head -n1
0
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 2, in <module>
    print i
IOError: [Errno 32] Broken pipe

The -u option tells python to automatically flush the stdin and stdout, as bash would do. So you see that the program actually stops with an error.

  • 1
    Nice use of Python for detailed information. – Davidmh Oct 20 '14 at 11:22
  • 1
    Using python to root cause the problem was lovely. – Mangat Rai Modi Oct 21 '14 at 6:17
  • 1
    @MangatRai Actually I did the opposite, I thought: bash? Noo, let's write this in python, and the error popped up :) but next time I have a strange problem with bash I will use python again! – enrico.bacis Oct 21 '14 at 6:21
1

This is more of a comment then an answer but it is too big for a comment.

I tried following script:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

rm -f "test_head.log"
echo "1 line"
echo "1 line" >> "test_head.log"
echo "2 line"
echo "2 line" >> "test_head.log"
echo "3 line"
echo "3 line" >> "test_head.log"
echo "4 line"
echo "4 line" >> "test_head.log"
echo "5 line"
echo "5 line" >> "test_head.log"
echo "6 line"
echo "6 line" >> "test_head.log"
echo "7 line"
echo "7 line" >> "test_head.log"
echo "8 line"   
echo "8 line" >> "test_head.log"

Then i ran the script with:

./test_head.sh | head -n1

The cat output is (to my surprise):

1 line

I have no idea what is going on.

After reading @ymonad comment i tried it out and replace echo with /bin/echo and that solved the problem. I hope he can explain more about this behaviour.

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