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I have this web app that is served via https, and now it needs to use a websocket service that is served from another server. Chrome, Firefox and Internet Explorer complain right away that if the application is secure (https), then it is not allowed to connect to an insecure websocket service (ws:// URI). Strangely, Apple Safari doesn't complain so.

Well, fair enough, I assumed any globally trusted certificate would be fine to be installed at the websocket server side, to enable secure service (wss:// URI). However the company that maintains the socket server claims that they have to install there the very same certificate that secures my web application. I read in webs that the wss will not run with self-signed certificate, but nowhere that it must be the same certificate that the calling web site runs on.

Since we are talking sharing a certificate key file with 3rd party, I wanted to double check this. If my secure site runs at domain first.com, and the websocket server at IP address a.b.c.d, what kind of certificate should be installed on the websocket server to enable the communication? On one hand, that would be a kind of cross-site scripting, but perhaps the browser security model allows it, assuming the user knows what they want?

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What I understand from above, the browser connects to your web application and is then redirected to the other server. If that be the case, then browser would complain about being redirected to unsecured site from a secured URL. The way forward actually depends on the domain of the server that the redirect is happening to, for example, if your main site has URL form www.mainsite.com and the target site has URL form abc.secondsite.com or an IP, the second server must have configured an SSL certificate that has been issued to either abc.secondsite.com of the IP i.e. the name of the host requested must match exactly with the SSL ceritficate that is provided by the secondsite.

The secondsite technically does not have to have the same certificate as your mainsite, it just have to be a certificate issued by a trusted source (like Verisign etc.).

On the other hand, if you have a wildcard subdomain certificate i.e. a certificate issues is valid for all the *.mainsite.com domains and the URL form of the secondsite is sub_domain.mainsite.com, then the same certificate can be used on both the servers.

Hope this helps.

thanks

  • No, the browser is handling a secure website, but the websocket connection is established with a help of JavaScript. So, the scenario you are describing does not apply. – Passiday Oct 20 '14 at 11:50
  • Well, now that would be a problem, as you have to connect to same domain or subdomain only. If the WS server is configured to be a subdomain of your main domain, you could use a wild card SSL certificate. – Ironluca Oct 22 '14 at 5:02
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Since we are talking sharing a certificate key file with 3rd party, I wanted to double check this. If my secure site runs at domain first.com, and the websocket server at IP address a.b.c.d, what kind of certificate should be installed on the websocket server to enable the communication? On one hand, that would be a kind of cross-site scripting, but perhaps the browser security model allows it, assuming the user knows what they want?

You cannot provide a certificate for an IP address. In order to use WSS:// you need to connect to a domain name, and have a valid certificate for that domain name. So you need a SSL certificate for the domain name of your WebSocket server.

As far as I know, it does not need to be the same than the one on the site. You can check by entering here: http://vtortola.github.io/ng-terminal-emulator/ and executing the command websocket wss://echo.websocket.org, you will connect to a WebSocket in websocket.org that echoes your inputs.

WebSockets are not constrained by the SOP (Same Origin Policy), you can connect anywhere, and the server is responsible of checking the HTTP request header "Origin" and accept or refuse the connection.

  • The websocket server is in the company intranet, with local IP address. I can set up a local DNS entry for it, but will it be possible to establish wss connection with self-signed certificate? I read that it needs authority-issued certificates (soon not available for local domain names), but isn't it fixable if I install my own root certificates on user's computers? – Passiday Oct 20 '14 at 14:11
  • You can use a self-signed certificate if the web-page is using the same certificate, therefore the browser can prompt the user for accepting such certificate. Otherwise the WS connection will fail. If you manage to use a certificate signed by a CA that the browser trusts, the WebSocket will work. The trust starts in the computer, so the browser will trust custom certificates as well. So yes, probably an option is to install a custom root certificate, and put in the websocket server a certificate signed by that root one. – vtortola Oct 20 '14 at 14:29
  • Unfortunately I am not much into those IT matters, I cannot guide you more accurately on how to do it. – vtortola Oct 20 '14 at 14:30
  • I'll see if that setup works and report back to the forum. Thanks! – Passiday Oct 20 '14 at 14:36

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