4

There is an undesirable C-style cast that I'm not able to prevent to compile. The undesirable cast performs a C-style cast from an object of some class to a non-const reference of some other class. The classes are unrelated. In the same time I like to support the C-style cast from an object of the same class to the const reference. I'm providing a public conversion operator to support the desirable cast. It seems that it is impossible to prevent the undesirable cast in this case.
The cast to non-const reference fails to build ("Sandbox::B::operator Sandbox::A &()" (declared at line 30) is inaccessible*), unfortunately cast to const reference either fails (error: more than one conversion function from "Sandbox::B" to "const Sandbox::A" applies: function "Sandbox::B::operator const Sandbox::A &()" function "Sandbox::B::operator Sandbox::A &()"):

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>

namespace Sandbox {
    class A {
    public:
        A (int i) : _x (i) { }
    private:
        int _x;
    };

    class B {
    public:
        B (const char* m) : _m (m), _a (std::atoi (m)) { }

        /*
         * This one shall be supported.
         */ 
        operator const A& () {
            return _a;
        }
    private:
        /*
         * This one shall be not supported.
         * If this one is disabled both desired and undesired conversions pass the compilation.
         */ 
        operator A& ();

        const std::string _m;
        const A _a;
    };
}

int main () {
    Sandbox::A a (1973);
    Sandbox::B b ("1984");

    /*
     * This is the undesirable cast and it shall fail to compile.
     */
    (Sandbox::A&)b;
    /*
     * This is the desirable cast and it shall pass the compilation.
     */
    (const Sandbox::A&)b;

    return 0;
}

If I'm disabling operator operator A& () both desired and undesired conversions are build.

I'm using gcc, icc and MSVC compiles. I cannot control the client code and prevent there use of C-style cast.

  • 1
    Would removing the non-const version and just keeping the const version achieve what you want? Or would that default the non-const version to an ordinary c cast? – Ben Oct 20 '14 at 10:25
  • 2
    With cast you can cast from anything to anything and there is nothing you can do about this. Or am I wrong? – Tomashu Oct 20 '14 at 10:31
  • 5
    Why do you want to support C-style cast? I mean, why do you write C-style casts? When you use static_cast and don't define the non-const version, everything is as expected. – leemes Oct 20 '14 at 10:39
  • 4
    Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't get the point of the question. You've got crappy code that you cannot change and you want to stop it from compiling. Then simply don't compile it :) – Hans Passant Oct 20 '14 at 11:18
  • 1
    You can't avoid the client code to cast away const-ness if he uses C-style cast, because C-style cast allows casting away const-ness. Simply don't use them; upgrade your client code to use static_cast. – leemes Oct 20 '14 at 14:27
3

This should do the trick (tested on clang3.5):

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>

namespace Sandbox {
  class A {
  public:
    A (int i) : _x (i) { }

    void        fun()
    {
      std::cout << "action" << std::endl;
    }

  private:
    int _x;
  };

  class B {
  public:
    B (const char* m) : _m (m), _a (std::atoi (m)) { }

    /*
     * This one shall be supported.
     */
    template<typename T, typename Enable = typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<T, A>::value, A>::type>
    operator const T& ()
    {
      return _a;
    }

    /*
     * This one shall be not supported.
     * If this one is disabled both desired and undesired conversions pass the compilation.
     */
  private:
    template<typename T, typename Enable = typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<T, A>::value, A>::type>
    operator T& ();

    const std::string _m;
    const A _a;
  };
}

int main () {
  Sandbox::A a (1973);
  Sandbox::B b ("1984");

  /*
   * This is the undesirable cast and it shall fail to compile.
   */
  (Sandbox::A&)b;

  /*
   * This is the desirable cast and it shall pass the compilation.
   */
  (const Sandbox::A&)b;

  return 0;
}

As for why your version doesn't do what you want, it is related to the rules of the C-Style cast:

When the C-style cast expression is encountered, the compiler attempts the following cast expressions, in this order:

a) const_cast(expression)

b) static_cast(expression), with extensions: pointer or reference to a derived class is additionally allowed to be cast to pointer or reference to unambiguous base class (and vice versa) even if the base class is inaccessible (that is, this cast ignores the private inheritance specifier). Same applies to casting pointer to member to pointer to member of unambigous non-virtual base

c) static_cast (with extensions) followed by const_cast

d) reinterpret_cast(expression)

e) reinterpret_cast followed by const_cast

The first choice that satisfies the requirements of the respective cast operator is selected, even if it cannot be compiled

Disclaimer: This explanation is based on guesses mostly, there are multiple steps and complex rules so i'm not sure everything really works as i think i've understood it but here you go.

Since you cast to a reference, reinterpret_cast will always works based on its rules of type aliasing, so the only way to make that C-Style cast fail is to make a static_cast on that type unambiguously produce an error. Unfortunately the conversion rules doesn't seem to consider a user defined conversion to const type to be a better match than a user defined conversion to a non cv-qualified type, they are both on the same level even if the static_cast target type is const qualified. Whereas with templates, SFINAE and parameter deduction kicks in and with some magic compiler powder extracted from a mountain dragon, it works. (yeah this step is a little more mysterious to me too).

  • Thank you for the nice and the clear explanation and for your relay interesting solution. I still can not understand why “conversion rules doesn't seem to consider a user defined conversion to const type to be a better match than a user defined conversion to a non cv-qualified type”. I'm trying to apply your solution, also in my case I have to relate on boost (since I use C++98) and this can be unacceptable (as depending on boost in widely used interface headers is believed to increase the build time). – Lesh Oct 21 '14 at 8:56
  • @Lesh I guess it is because using a type as its const version is an implicit conversion that always works, thus when you cast to const T the compiler tries to find a conversion to T knowing that it can still add the const without problem. Something like that. And for some reason adding the const seems to count as a no cost operation in overload resolution. – Drax Oct 21 '14 at 9:10
  • I had check your solution. Unfortunately it prevents from the follow valid code to compile: void acceptA (const A& a) { ... } ... Sandbox::B b ("1984"); acceptA(b); //Compilation error at this line error: more than one instance of overloaded function "Sandbox::acceptA" matches the argument list: function "Sandbox::acceptA(const Sandbox::A &)" function "Sandbox::acceptA(Sandbox::A &)" argument types are: (Sandbox::B) – Lesh Oct 21 '14 at 11:48
  • This error can be bypassed by explicitly cast: `acceptA (static_cast<const Sandbox::A&> (b));' – Lesh Oct 21 '14 at 12:06
  • @Lesh It shouldn't. The error message you have is saying that you have 2 overloads of acceptA, one which take const Sandbox::A& and another which takes 'Sandbox::A&' and that is the source of the error, not the 2 conversions. – Drax Oct 21 '14 at 12:20

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