What is the best method of storing an Enum in a Database using C# And Visual Studio and MySQL Data Connector.

I am going to be creating a new project with over 100 Enums, and majority of them will have to be stored in the database. Creating converters for each one would be a long winded process therefore I'm wondering if visual studio or someone has any methods for this that I haven't heard off.

  • +1 I'm interested in opinions as to whether this sort of thing should be enforced with separate tables and a FK constraint or just a regular constraint if anyone has any views? – Martin Smith Apr 15 '10 at 15:13
  • 2
    @Martin Not planning on answering as this will tend to be quite subjective, but for an OLTP/ODS I would use separate tables with an FK constraint. For a DSS reporting solution, I would denormalize and store the enum's symbolic name (or description) in the reporting table with the other facts. – Jesse C. Slicer Apr 15 '10 at 16:34
up vote 48 down vote accepted
    [Required]
    public virtual int PhoneTypeId
    {
        get
        {
            return (int)this.PhoneType;
        }
        set
        {
            PhoneType = (PhoneTypes)value;
        }
    }
    [EnumDataType(typeof(PhoneTypes))]
    public PhoneTypes PhoneType { get; set; }

public enum PhoneTypes
{
    Mobile = 0,
    Home = 1,
    Work = 2,
    Fax = 3,
    Other = 4
}

Works like a charm! No need to convert (int)Enum or (Enum)int in code. Just use the enum and ef code first will save the int for you. p.s.: "[EnumDataType(typeof(PhoneTypes))]" attribute is not required, just an extra if you want additional functionality.

Alternatively you can do:

[Required]
    public virtual int PhoneTypeId { get; set; }
    [EnumDataType(typeof(PhoneTypes))]
    public PhoneTypes PhoneType
    {
        get
        {
            return (PhoneTypes)this.PhoneTypeId;
        }
        set
        {
            this.PhoneTypeId = (int)value;
        }
    }

We store ours as ints or longs and then we can just cast 'em back and forth. Probably not the most robust solution, but that what we do.

we are using typed DataSets, so, for example:

eunum BlockTreatmentType 
{
    All = 0
};

// blockTreatmentType is an int property
blockRow.blockTreatmentType = (int)BlockTreatmentType.All;
BlockTreatmentType btt = (BlockTreatmentType)blockRow.blocktreatmenttype;
  • How do you cast em? And what do you store? The ordinal value, or a custom attribute? – Michal Ciechan Apr 15 '10 at 15:38
  • added a code snippet – Muad'Dib Apr 15 '10 at 16:10
  • 2
    this seams like an acceptable solution. I'll leave the question open for a while see what people come up with. I'm assuming that the you manually set the int value of the enum to prevent order/cardinal changing? – Michal Ciechan Apr 15 '10 at 17:14
  • yes, we set it explicitly so it wont automagically change on us. that could be a Bad Thing – Muad'Dib Apr 15 '10 at 17:29

In the end you will need a great way to deal with repetitious coding tasks such as enum converters. You can use a code generator such as MyGeneration or CodeSmith among many others or perhaps an ORM mapper like nHibernate to handle everything for you.

As for the structure... with hundreds of enums I would first consider trying to organize the data into a single table that might look something like this: (pseudo sql)

MyEnumTable(
EnumType as int,
EnumId as int PK,
EnumValue as int )

that would allow you to store your enum info in a single table. EnumType could also be a foreign key to a table that defines the different enums.

Your biz objects would be linked to this table via EnumId. The enum type is there only for organization and filtering in the UI. Utilizing all of this of course depends on your code structure and problem domain.

Btw, in this scenario you would want to set a clustered index on EnumType rather than leaving the default cluster idx that is created on the PKey.

  • Interesting way of storing enums. But the main way why i want to use Enums (c# based) is for readability, eg. if (something.Type == Enum.EnumType) This project will be a very long and complex projects and with 100's of enum it will be hard to keep track and going back to database each time. – Michal Ciechan Apr 15 '10 at 15:33

Some things you should take in consideration.

Is the enumeration column going to be used directly by other applications like for example reports. This will limit the possibility of the enumeration being stored in it's integer format because that value will have no meaning when present in a report unless the reports have custom logic.

What are the i18n needs for your application? If it only supports one language you can save the enumeration as text and create a helper method to convert from a description string. You can use [DescriptionAttribute] for this and methods for the conversion can probably be found by searching SO.

If on the other hand you have the need to support multiple language and external application access to your data you can start considering if enumeration are really the answer. Other option like lookup tables can be considered if the scenario is more complex.

Enumerations are excellent when they are self contained in code... when they cross that border, things tend to get a bit messy.


Update:

You can convert from an integer using Enum.ToObject method. This implies that you know the type of the enumeration when converting. If you want to make it completely generic you need to store the type of the enumeration alongside it's value in the database. You could create data dictionary support tables to tell you which columns are enumerations and what type are them.

  • Ideally reports will be built using the same library that holds the enums, so storing integers in the database is perfectly fine. The only problem is, when you extract from database how do you convert to original enum? (100+ of enums each with 5+ of values) – Michal Ciechan Apr 15 '10 at 15:37

If you want a store of all of your enums values, you can try the below tables to store enums and their members, and the code snippet to add those values. I'd only do this at install time, however, since those values will never change until you recompile!

DB Table:

   create table EnumStore (
    EnumKey int NOT NULL identity primary key,
    EnumName varchar(100)
);
GO

create table EnumMember (
    EnumMemberKey int NOT NULL identity primary key,
    EnumKey int NOT NULL,
    EnumMemberValue int,
    EnumMemberName varchar(100)
);
GO
--add code to create foreign key between tables, and index on EnumName, EnumMemberValue, and EnumMemberName

C# Snippet:

void StoreEnum<T>() where T: Enum
    {
        Type enumToStore = typeof(T);
        string enumName = enumToStore.Name;

        int enumKey = DataAccessLayer.CreateEnum(enumName);
        foreach (int enumMemberValue in Enum.GetValues(enumToStore))
        {
            string enumMemberName = Enum.GetName(enumToStore, enumMemberValue);
            DataAccessLayer.AddEnumMember(enumKey, enumMemberValue, enumMemberName);
        }
    }

If you need store in DB string values of enum field, better do like show below. For example, it can be needed if you are using SQLite, which don`t support enum fields.

[Required]
public string PhoneTypeAsString
{
    get
    {
        return this.PhoneType.ToString();
    }
    set
    {
        PhoneType = (PhoneTypes)Enum.Parse( typeof(PhoneTypes), value, true);
    }
}

public PhoneTypes PhoneType{get; set;};

public enum PhoneTypes
{
    Mobile = 0,
    Home = 1,
    Work = 2,
    Fax = 3,
    Other = 4
}
  • 1
    Depending how often you convert these (e.g. 50k objects) you're better of having a converter/extension methods with a switch method as ToString and Enum.Parse uses reflection. Just FYI – Michal Ciechan Jun 16 '16 at 7:27
  • Yes. I agree. But for a small load is easy solution is suitable. – trueboroda Jun 16 '16 at 9:14

I'm not sure if it is the most flexible, but you could simply store the string versions of them. It is certainly readable, but maybe difficult to maintain. Enums convert from strings and back pretty easily:

public enum TestEnum
{
    MyFirstEnum,
    MySecondEnum
}

static void TestEnums()
{
    string str = TestEnum.MyFirstEnum.ToString();
    Console.WriteLine( "Enum = {0}", str );
    TestEnum e = (TestEnum)Enum.Parse( typeof( TestEnum ), "MySecondEnum", true );
    Console.WriteLine( "Enum = {0}", e );
}

Why not try separating the enums altogether from the DB? I found this article to be a great reference while working on something similar:

http://stevesmithblog.com/blog/reducing-sql-lookup-tables-and-function-properties-in-nhibernate/

The ideas in it should apply regardless of what DB you use. For example, in MySQL you can use the "enum" data type to enforce compliance with your coded enums:

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/enum.html

Cheers

A DB first approach can be used by creating a consistent table for each enum where the Id column name matches table name. It's advantageous to have enum values available within the database to support foreign key constraints and friendly columns in views. We are currently supporting ~100 enum types scattered throughout numerous versioned databases.

For a Code-First preference, the T4 strategy shown below could probably be reversed to write to the database.

create table SomeSchema.SomeEnumType (
  SomeEnumTypeId smallint NOT NULL primary key,
  Name varchar(100) not null,
  Description nvarchar(1000),
  ModifiedUtc datetime2(7) default(sysutcdatetime()),
  CreatedUtc datetime2(7) default(sysutcdatetime()),
);

Each table can be imported into C# using a T4 template (*.tt) script.

  1. Create an "Enumeration Project". Add the .tt file shown below.
  2. Create a sub-folder for each Database Schema name.
  3. For each enum type, create a file whose name is SchemaName.TableName.tt. The file contents are always the same single line: <#@ include file="..\EnumGenerator.ttinclude" #>
  4. Then to create/update the enums, right click on 1 or more files and "Run Custom Tool" (we don't have auto update yet). It will add/update a .cs file to the project:
using System.CodeDom.Compiler;
namespace TheCompanyNamespace.Enumerations.Config
{
    [GeneratedCode("Auto Enum from DB Generator", "10")]
    public enum DatabasePushJobState
    {     
          Undefined = 0,
          Created = 1,        
    } 
    public partial class EnumDescription
    {
       public static string Description(DatabasePushJobState enumeration)
       {
          string description = "Unknown";
          switch (enumeration)
          {                   
              case DatabasePushJobState.Undefined:
                  description = "Undefined";
                  break;

              case DatabasePushJobState.Created:
                  description = "Created";
                  break;                 
           }
           return description;
       }
    }
    // select DatabasePushJobStateId, Name, coalesce(Description,Name) as Description
    //    from TheDefaultDatabase.[SchName].[DatabasePushJobState]
    //   where 1=1 order by DatabasePushJobStateId 
 }

And finally, the somewhat gnarly T4 script (simplified from numerous workarounds). It will need to be customized to your environment. A debug flag can output messages into the C#. There is also a "Debug T4 Template" option when right clicking the .tt file. EnumGenerator.ttinclude:

<#@ template debug="true" hostSpecific="true" #>
<#@ output extension=".generated.cs" #>
<#@ Assembly Name="EnvDTE" #>
<#@ Assembly Name="System.Core" #>
<#@ Assembly Name="System.Data" #>
<#@ assembly name="$(TargetPath)" #>
<#@ import namespace="EnvDTE" #>
<#@ import namespace="System" #>
<#@ import namespace="System.Collections" #>
<#@ import namespace="System.Collections.Generic" #>
<#@ import namespace="System.Data" #>
<#@ import namespace="System.Data.SqlClient" #>
<#@ import namespace="System.IO" #>
<#@ import namespace="System.Text.RegularExpressions" #>
<#  
    bool doDebug = false;   // include debug statements to appear in generated output    

    string schemaTableName = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(Host.TemplateFile);
    string schema = schemaTableName.Split('.')[0];
    string tableName = schemaTableName.Split('.')[1];

    string path = Path.GetDirectoryName(Host.TemplateFile);    
    string enumName = tableName;
    string columnId = enumName + "Id";
    string columnName = "Name"; 
    string columnDescription = "Description";

    string currentVersion = CompanyNamespace.Enumerations.Constants.Constants.DefaultDatabaseVersionSuffix;

    // Determine Database Name using Schema Name
    //
    Dictionary<string, string> schemaToDatabaseNameMap = new Dictionary<string, string> {
        { "Cfg",        "SomeDbName" + currentVersion },
        { "Common",     "SomeOtherDbName" + currentVersion }
        // etc.     
    };

    string databaseName;
    if (!schemaToDatabaseNameMap.TryGetValue(schema, out databaseName))
    {
        databaseName = "TheDefaultDatabase"; // default if not in map
    }

    string connectionString = @"Integrated Security=SSPI;Persist Security Info=False;Initial Catalog=" + databaseName + @";Data Source=Machine\Instance";

    schema = "[" + schema + "]";
    tableName = "[" + tableName + "]";

    string whereConstraint = "1=1";  // adjust if needed for specific tables

  // Get containing project
  IServiceProvider serviceProvider = (IServiceProvider)Host;
  DTE dte = (DTE)serviceProvider.GetService(typeof(DTE));
  Project project = dte.Solution.FindProjectItem(Host.TemplateFile).ContainingProject;
#>
using System;
using System.CodeDom.Compiler;

namespace <#= project.Properties.Item("DefaultNamespace").Value #><#= Path.GetDirectoryName(Host.TemplateFile).Remove(0, Path.GetDirectoryName(project.FileName).Length).Replace("\\", ".") #>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Auto-generated Enumeration from Source Table <#= databaseName + "." + schema + "." + tableName #>.  Refer to end of file for SQL.
    /// Please do not modify, your changes will be lost!
    /// </summary>
    [GeneratedCode("Auto Enum from DB Generator", "10")]
    public enum <#= enumName #>
    {       
<#
        SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString);
        // Description is optional, uses name if null
        string command = string.Format(
            "select {0}, {1}, coalesce({2},{1}) as {2}" + "\n  from {3}.{4}.{5}\n where {6} order by {0}", 
                columnId,           // 0
                columnName,         // 1
                columnDescription,  // 2
                databaseName,       // 3
                schema,             // 4
                tableName,          // 5
                whereConstraint);   // 6
        #><#= DebugCommand(databaseName, command, doDebug) #><#

        SqlCommand comm = new SqlCommand(command, conn);

        conn.Open();

        SqlDataReader reader = comm.ExecuteReader();
        bool loop = reader.Read();

        while(loop)
        {
#>      /// <summary>
        /// <#= reader[columnDescription] #>
        /// </summary>
        <#= Pascalize(reader[columnName]) #> = <#= reader[columnId] #><# loop = reader.Read(); #><#= loop ? ",\r\n" : string.Empty #>
<#
        }
#>    }


    /// <summary>
    /// A helper class to return the Description for each enumeration value
    /// </summary>
    public partial class EnumDescription
    {
        public static string Description(<#= enumName #> enumeration)
        {
            string description = "Unknown";

            switch (enumeration)
            {<#
    conn.Close();
    conn.Open();
    reader = comm.ExecuteReader();
    loop = reader.Read();

    while(loop)
    {#>                 
                    case <#= enumName #>.<#= Pascalize(reader[columnName]) #>:
                        description = "<#= reader[columnDescription].ToString().Replace("\"", "\\\"") #>";
                        break;
                    <# loop = reader.Read(); #>
<#
      }
      conn.Close();
#> 
            }

            return description;
        }
    }
    /*
        <#= command.Replace("\n", "\r\n        ") #>
    */
}
<#+     
    private string Pascalize(object value)
    {
        Regex rxStartsWithKeyWord = new Regex(@"^[0-9]|^abstract$|^as$|^base$|^bool$|^break$|^byte$|^case$|^catch$|^char$|^checked$|^class$|^const$|^continue$|^decimal$|^default$|^delegate$|^do$|^double$|^else$|^enum$|^event$|^explicit$|^extern$|^$false|^finally$|^fixed$|^float$|^for$|^foreach$|^goto$|^if$|^implicit$|^in$|^int$|^interface$|^internal$|^is$|^lock$|^long$|^namespace$|^new$|^null$|^object$|^operator$|^out$|^overrride$|^params$|^private$|^protected$|^public$|^readonly$|^ref$|^return$|^sbyte$|^sealed$|^short$|^sizeof$|^stackalloc$|^static$|^string$|^struct$|^switch$|^this$|^thorw$|^true$|^try$|^typeof$|^uint$|^ulong$|^unchecked$|^unsafe$|^ushort$|^using$|^virtual$|^volatile$|^void$|^while$", RegexOptions.Compiled);

        Regex rx = new Regex(@"(?:[^a-zA-Z0-9]*)(?<first>[a-zA-Z0-9])(?<reminder>[a-zA-Z0-9]*)(?:[^a-zA-Z0-9]*)");
        string rawName = rx.Replace(value.ToString(), m => m.Groups["first"].ToString().ToUpper() + m.Groups["reminder"].ToString());

        if (rxStartsWithKeyWord.Match(rawName).Success)
            rawName =  "_" + rawName;

        return rawName;    
    }

    private string DebugCommand(string databaseName, string command, bool doDebug)
    {       
        return doDebug
            ? "        // use " + databaseName + ";  " + command + ";\r\n\r\n"
            : "";
    }   
#>

Hopefully the entity framework will someday support a combination of these answers to offer the C# enum strong typing within records and database mirroring of values.

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