74

My understanding is that all Bootstrap-styled elements must exist inside a <div class="container"> element. But sometimes I see Bootstrap examples where there are multiple "containers":

<div class="container">
    <!-- Blah, GUI stuff, blah -->
</div>

...

<div class="container">
    <!-- Blah, more GUI stuff, blah -->
</div>

My questions:

  1. When would you ever need a single HTML page with multiple "container divs"? What benefit does this offer as opposed to just putting the entire body inside one big "container div"?
  2. Would you ever want to nest "container divs" inside other ones? When/why?
  • 1
    If you are using a full-width carousel it has containers used for the captions so it shouldn't be in a container. Because of that you could have a container above it and a container below it. – Aibrean Oct 21 '14 at 13:16
  • 1
    While @Christina is correct in that the docs say you don't nest containers, sometimes it is used and useful. See stackoverflow.com/questions/29660034/… for additional info on nesting. – gidmanma Dec 22 '16 at 16:55
74
  1. Some sections of the page will span the full viewport width and others won't. Some backgrounds will be the full width but the content won't.

    An example of this is a featurette area which has a background image or color that is the full width of the viewport but the content inside that, forms or whatever, don't exceed the .container at any given viewport width.

  2. You don't nest .container or .container-fluid -- see the docs. It's not necessary.

    Docs: Bootstrap requires a containing element to wrap site contents and house our grid system. You may choose one of two containers to use in your projects. Note that, due to padding and more, neither container is nestable [neither means that .container and .container-fluid are NOT to be nested].

  • 2
    I often have a .container-fluid for something like the nav bar or banner of some sort while the main site sits inside a .container. – DavidG Oct 20 '14 at 15:38
  • 3
    @DavidG Yes, and then you have double padding. Docs: Bootstrap requires a containing element to wrap site contents and house our grid system. You may choose one of two containers to use in your projects. Note that, due to padding and more, neither container is nestable. getbootstrap.com/css – Christina Oct 20 '14 at 15:41
  • 2
    I don't mean nested of course. – DavidG Oct 20 '14 at 15:44
  • 1
    @DavidG. I don't use .container-fluid unless the immediate child is a .row and the columns. – Christina Oct 20 '14 at 15:45
  • 1
    Neither do I. I meant that I would have a fluid container with the nav bar so it bleeds off the edges of the screen, then after the container close tag, start a new non-fluid container with the main content. – DavidG Oct 20 '14 at 15:46
14

Unlike what some have said, you can nest a container-fluid inside a container. There is even an example on the official bootstrap website:

http://getbootstrap.com/examples/navbar/

4

Actually its totally depends upon the requirement of the designer.

Some times you need full width of the row ( i mean to say viewport or a strip of visible part that you can achieved without separate container class )

http://binarytheme.com/demos?theme=bootsrap-landing-page-blue

see above template example to understand

4

In the Layout section of the 4.3 docs, https://getbootstrap.com/docs/4.3/layout/overview/#containers, it now states

While containers can be nested, most layouts do not require a nested container.

Just be aware of what others have stated about padding, etc.

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