1741

How do I determine if variable is undefined or null? My code is as follows:

var EmpName = $("div#esd-names div#name").attr('class');
if(EmpName == 'undefined'){
  //DO SOMETHING
};
<div id="esd-names">
  <div id="name"></div>
</div>

But if I do this, the JavaScript interpreter halts execution.

24 Answers 24

2388

You can use the qualities of the abstract equality operator to do this:

if (variable == null){
    // your code here.
}

Because null == undefined is true, the above code will catch both null and undefined.

  • 2
    I'm trying to test if event is null in firefox and an error blocks the execution: "event is undefined" – Entretoize Sep 6 '18 at 10:32
  • Can you share the section of code that's erroring? Use a pastebin link. – temporary_user_name Nov 18 '18 at 15:13
978

The standard way to catch null and undefined simultaneously is this:

if (variable == null) {
     // do something 
}

--which is 100% equivalent to the more explicit but less concise:

if (variable === undefined || variable === null) {
     // do something 
}

When writing professional JS, it's taken for granted that type equality and the behavior of == vs === is understood. Therefore we use == and only compare to null.


Edit again

The comments suggesting the use of typeof are simply wrong. Yes, my solution above will cause a ReferenceError if the variable doesn't exist. This is a good thing. This ReferenceError is desirable: it will help you find your mistakes and fix them before you ship your code, just like compiler errors would in other languages.

You should not have any references to undeclared variables in your code.

  • 40
    This will cause a ReferenceError and break execution if variable is not defined or referred to at all in the code, using typeof is safer. – Mani Gandham Jun 15 '14 at 9:49
  • 40
    That's more of a stylistic point. If the variable hasn't been declared at all, that's really just bad writing on the part of the author. You should know whether your variable has been declared or not, that shouldn't be a question. But yes, if for some reason that's the case, this should be changed to window.variable instead of just variable, which will not cause a reference error. Typeof should be avoided. – temporary_user_name Jun 15 '14 at 15:40
  • 4
    Yes because you wrote !== instead of !=. – temporary_user_name Oct 12 '16 at 15:39
  • 6
    -OP: The statement about those comparisons being "100% equivalent" is SIMPLY WRONG, as you noted in your own EDIT, the second will cause a ReferenceError. As for the assertion: "You should not have any references to undeclared variables in your code." REALLY? Ever heard of Optional Parameters? jsfiddle.net/3xnbxfsu – Timothy Kanski Jan 9 '17 at 22:04
  • 7
    @TimothyKanski optional parameters may be undefined if they are optionally not provided, but they are most definitely declared variables. They are declared and have a value of undefined, as any declared but uninitialized variable would, ie var someVar; so your argument doesn't really hold up – chiliNUT Mar 5 '17 at 1:14
179
if (variable == null) {
    // Do stuff, will only match null or undefined, this won't match false
}
  • 14
    Just in case anybody thinks this is another half-answer, this actually does work. undefined evaluates equal to null. – Chuck Apr 15 '10 at 18:37
  • 3
    Failed to me in chrome console... ReferenceError: variable is not defined, so it might work, but not for me... – Eran Medan Mar 14 '12 at 0:46
  • 46
    It only works for declared variables, not variables that may or may not be declared, which is rarely the case. (You need to use typeof + a null check for that case) – user216441 Mar 15 '12 at 0:07
  • 11
    Just figured out you can add this comment: /*jshint eqnull:true */ to the top of your JS document or function, and JSHint will stop warning you about your uses of == null. – Web_Designer Jun 18 '13 at 21:02
  • 3
    @Aerovistae can you point me to a reference that explicitly states that == is broken. The coercive if(variable == null) in this answer makes complete sense to me... – Ben Feb 21 '14 at 21:44
175

Combining the above answers, it seems the most complete answer would be:

if( typeof variable === 'undefined' || variable === null ){
    // Do stuff
}

This should work for any variable that is either undeclared or declared and explicitly set to null or undefined. The boolean expression should evaluate to false for any declared variable that has an actual non-null value.

  • 2
    @Aerovistae I recognize that typeof is an operator, not a function, so it doesn't need the parentheses, but I appreciate the parentheses nonetheless - simply for reading clarity. – user664833 Sep 4 '14 at 23:28
  • what about directly checking if(variable===undefined) instead of using typeof? – Frozen Crayon Mar 5 '15 at 13:45
  • 1
    @ArjunU that will cause a ReferenceError if the variable isn't declared. If you don't know whether or not a variable is declared, used the above solution. If you can guarantee that the variable is at least declared, you can use variable == null – Rogue Mar 31 '15 at 16:04
  • 2
    This is a better solution because as @Rogue pointed out, the variable might not be declared. – Abdul Sadik Yalcin May 13 '16 at 11:13
  • Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't the first conditional a superset of the second one, and therefore the second conditional is superfluous? – March Ho May 31 '16 at 3:03
81
if (typeof EmpName != 'undefined' && EmpName) {

will evaluate to true if value is not:

  • null

  • undefined

  • NaN

  • empty string ("")

  • 0

  • false

  • 11
    I think this is a dangerous technique that has spread like wild fire. Because a lot of the variables that are checked could be boolean or numbers. So if the user does not fully understand the consequences, this is no good. – usefulBee Jan 20 '16 at 21:18
  • Please provide a reference of this javascript especification – villamejia May 20 '16 at 16:30
  • This is the same as if (EmpName). If it's undefined will be falsy already. – Rudy Nov 11 '16 at 15:39
  • If variable is not defined. then if(EmpName) will throw error – Thamaraiselvam Nov 12 '16 at 3:44
  • 1
    @Thamaraiselvam I think Rudy might have meant this var EmpName; if (EmpName). Where the variable is defined but not assigned a value. – hungerstar Nov 16 '16 at 15:36
22

jQuery attr() function returns either a blank string or the actual value (and never null or undefined). The only time it returns undefined is when your selector didn't return any element.

So you may want to test against a blank string. Alternatively, since blank strings, null and undefined are false-y, you can just do this:

if (!EmpName) { //do something }
  • 1
    Chrome 17.0.963.78 m gives this error: ReferenceError: EmpName is not defined – Eran Medan Mar 14 '12 at 0:47
  • 6
    @EranMedan I know this is late, but it will hopefully help people who come here later. The reason you get an error is because it has not been declared at all. Usually you'd have EmpName(or some other variable) be passed into a function, or the return value of another function and therefore declared(Example: "var x;"). To test if it returned undefined, or null, or blank string, you can use the above solution. – Dave Jun 25 '13 at 13:24
  • I realise this is a cold question, but jQuery will return undefined if the attribute doesn't exist on the element (not just just if the selector has no matching elements, as per the answer). For example, an img with no src would return undefined for $('img').attr('src'); – codinghands Aug 21 '18 at 13:13
9

If the variable you want to check is a global, do

if (window.yourVarName) {
    // Your code here
}

This way to check will not throw an error even if the yourVarName variable doesn't exist.

Example: I want to know if my browser supports History API

if (window.history) {
    history.back();
}

How this works:

window is an object which holds all global variables as its properties, and in JavaScript it is legal to try to access a non-existing object property. If history doesn't exist then window.history returns undefined. undefined is falsey, so code in an if(undefined){} block won't run.

  • 1
    Readers should note that an approach like this is idiomatic for checking - from JavaScript running in a browser - whether a global variable has been declared, and especially whether a browser-provided global (like the history API) is available. It will not work for checking whether a non-global variable is null or undefined, nor will it work if your JavaScript is running outside a browser (i.e. in Node.js). It will also treat globals set to 0, false or '' the same as those which are undeclared or undefined or null, which is usually fine. – Mark Amery Feb 5 '15 at 20:33
  • This assumes that the script is running in a browser. That's not a given. – GreenAsJade Oct 11 '16 at 11:10
7

I've come to write my own function for this... javascript is weird

Usable on literally anything. (Note that this also checks if the variable contains any usable values. But since this information is usually also needed, I think it's worth posting). Please consider leaving a note.

function empty(v) {
        let type = typeof v;
        if(type === 'undefined') {
            return true;
        }
        if(type=== 'boolean') {
            return !v;
        }
        if(v === null) {
            return true;
        }
        if(v === undefined) {
            return true;
        }
        if(v instanceof Array) {
            if(v.length < 1) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        else if(type === 'string') {
            if(v.length < 1) {
                return true;
            }
            if(v==='0') {
                return true;
            }
        }
        else if(type === 'object') {
            if(Object.keys(v).length < 1) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        else if(type === 'number') {
            if(v===0) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

Typescript-compatible.

edit. this function should do exactly the same thing like PHPs empty() function (see RETURN VALUES)

Considers undefined, null, false, 0, 0.0, "0" {}, [] as empty.

"0.0", NaN, " ", true are considered non-empty.

  • 1
    I have run into a little null checking problem. I want to check if a parameter being passed is null, or an empty object { }. This is a common and silly language problem, but I had forgotten about it. All my searches show answers for undefined of null value, or loose equality comparisons ( == ), but not strict equality ( === ) or equivalent. And then here in your -1 ranked answer at the very bottom of the page (before I upvoted) is the answer that eluded me. Object.keys( obj ).length < 1 or maybe === 0, assuming it will never be -1. Anyways, upvoted to 0, woo. :p – user314159 May 22 '16 at 15:40
  • Thanks, I've been able to drop this function in and clean up a lot of code. Why this isn't a standard JS function is beyond me. – Andy Jun 4 '17 at 17:25
  • 1
    You should change all of your == to === here, then this would be a reasonable function. – Ben McIntyre Jun 6 '17 at 23:48
6

Since you are using jQuery, you can determine whether a variable is undefined or its value is null by using a single function.

var s; // undefined
jQuery.isEmptyObject(s); // will return true;

s = null; // defined as null
jQuery.isEmptyObject(s); // will return true;

// usage
if(jQuery.isEmptyObject(s)){
    alert('Either variable: s is undefined or its value is null');
}else{
     alert('variable: s has value ' + s);
}

s = 'something'; // defined with some value
jQuery.isEmptyObject(s); // will return false;
  • This did not work for me. I still got the error: ReferenceError: s is not defined for the first example. – Mark May 19 '16 at 22:14
  • This does not work with number – bigtunacan Jul 25 '16 at 21:41
  • Not work detect jquery is error prntscr.com/h7pq4b – KingRider Nov 8 '17 at 10:40
4

I've just had this problem i.e. checking if an object is null.
I simply use this:

if (object) { Somecode}

i.e.

if (document.getElementById("enterJob")) 
  document.getElementById("enterJob").className += ' current';
  • 1
    it would be better to set var A = document.getElementById("enterJob") if(A)A.className+= ' current'; this way you do 50% work for same result... But maybe you just did it for shows and then I salute. – Harry Svensson Nov 18 '13 at 22:40
  • @Anthony. It works, so no ambiguity there. :) – Welshboy Jun 20 '16 at 17:20
3

jQuery check element not null

var dvElement = $('#dvElement');

if (dvElement.length  > 0) {
    //do something
}
else{
    //else do something else
}
2

With the solution below:

const getType = (val) => typeof val === 'undefined' || !val ? null : typeof val;
const isDeepEqual = (a, b) => getType(a) === getType(b);

console.log(isDeepEqual(1, 1)); // true
console.log(isDeepEqual(null, null)); // true
console.log(isDeepEqual([], [])); // true
console.log(isDeepEqual(1, "1")); // false
etc...

I'm able to check for the following:

  • null
  • undefined
  • NaN
  • empty
  • string ("")
  • 0
  • false
  • This does not answer the question, which is "how do I catch null and undefined?" not "how do I catch every falsey value in JavaScript?" – temporary_user_name Feb 13 '18 at 18:25
  • @Aerovistae, I thought I did with console.log(isDeepEqual(null, null)); and console.log(isDeepEqual(undefined, undefined)); ? – Tony Tai Nguyen Mar 22 '18 at 16:28
1

i run this test on chrome console, using (void 0) you can check undefined

var c;
undefined
if(c === void 0)alert();
// output =  undefined
var c = 1;
// output =  undefined
if(c === void 0)alert();
// output =   undefined
// check c value  c
// output =  1
if(c === void 0)alert();
// output =  undefined
c = undefined;
// output =  undefined
if(c === void 0)alert();
// output =   undefined
1

Best way:

if(typeof variable==='undefined' || variable===null) {

/* do your stuff */
}
  • 3
    This exact solution was already provided by @jkindwall on Oct 11, 2013. stackoverflow.com/a/19323555/2943403 This code-only post is completely useless because it adds no new value to the page. In fact, it is adding page bloat and wasting researchers time reading it. Please remove this answer. – mickmackusa May 24 '18 at 0:38
1
var i;

if(i === null || typeof i === 'undefined'){
console.log(i,'i is undefined or null')
}else{
console.log(i,'i has some value')
}
  • 1
    What happens if the user enters the word 'undefined' ? – Chuck Dec 7 '16 at 13:03
  • Your question is good, it show condition is true so that we need to change the option normal undefined into typeof condition. @Chuck – KARTHIKEYAN.A Dec 7 '16 at 13:58
  • This is wrong. typeof will never yield undefined, only the string 'undefined'. Moreover, i == null is already true if i is undefined, so the second boolean would be redundant even if it worked. – temporary_user_name Sep 17 '17 at 21:19
  • This solution (with the conditions reversed) was already provided by @jkindwall on Oct 11, 2013. stackoverflow.com/a/19323555/2943403 This code-only post is completely useless because it adds no new value to the page. In fact, it is adding page bloat and wasting researchers time reading it. Please remove this answer. – mickmackusa May 24 '18 at 0:40
0

You can check if the value is undefined or null by simply using typeof:

if(typeof value == 'undefined'){
  • See comments in the previous answer (stackoverflow.com/a/21273362/6305294) regarding typeof. – Alex Jul 26 '17 at 2:42
  • 2
    This is incorrect. Does not catch null. I do not understand why new, incorrect answers are being provided to a question that was given a correct and complete answer many years ago. Do you feel the current answers are somehow insufficient? – temporary_user_name Aug 30 '17 at 15:43
0
(null == undefined)  // true

(null === undefined) // false

Because === checks for both the type and value. Type of both are different but value is the same.

-1

Calling typeof null returns a value of “object”, as the special value null is considered to be an empty object reference. Safari through version 5 and Chrome through version 7 have a quirk where calling typeof on a regular expression returns “function” while all other browsers return “object”.

-1
var x;
if (x === undefined) {
    alert ("only declared, but not defined.")
};
if (typeof y === "undefined") {
    alert ("not even declared.")
};

You can only use second one: as it will check for both definition and declaration

-1

This is a very old question, but I still think the best/safe way to test these 2 conditions are to cast the value to string:

var EmpName = $("div#esd-names div#name").attr('class');

// Undefined check
if (Object.prototype.toString.call(EmpName) === '[object Undefined]'){
    // do something with your code
}

// Nullcheck
if (Object.prototype.toString.call(EmpName) === '[object Null]'){
    // do something with your code
}
  • can you explain why you believe this is the "best/safe way" to perform the tests? – sadmicrowave May 31 '17 at 12:50
  • Because the conversion is always returning a "standardized" string (i.e. [object Undefined]), so you don't get into trouble by testing falsy values. That's just my opinion based on experiences I had with truthy/falsy values. – n1kkou May 31 '17 at 13:04
  • Thanks for the explanation. I'm not criticizing, its an interesting answer, I just wanted you to provide some explanation for others as to why this is potentially superior to other methods. – sadmicrowave May 31 '17 at 13:06
  • No worries! I had a lot of issues with this type of comparisons, and until now, I find it as the most useful approach for this matter. – n1kkou May 31 '17 at 13:10
-1

I see that the original post was using JQuery. So I am adding what I have used in the past via JQuery. Usually when I am performing such a check I am not necessarily checking for the value to be null or undefined just for that purpose. More like "Is the value there so I can perform actions on it.". So for that I use the following. I have not tried every type but I know it works for both null and undefined. Also, objects and arrays(empty version of those will return true). Also, of course if the variable does not exist you will get an exception but I honestly try to avoid that at all costs. So I agree with Aerovistae. I want to know about this in my code and don't want to just skip over it.

if ($.trim(value) != '') {
   //Do Something
}
-1

In some circumstances it is possible to change the value of undefined. While these are generally rare, it can sometimes be best to avoid the actual use of the undefined value.

As a result, and because it is quicker to write, I have become accustomed to using a shortcut for undefined which is to look at the first value of an empty array. This value is guaranteed to be the primitive value undefined, and can be accessed with [][0].

This check will work to look for both undefined and null.

Here is an example:

(function(undefined){
    var foo = { baz: null };
    console.log(foo.bar === undefined); //false
    console.log(foo.bar == [][0]); //true
    console.log(foo.baz == [][0]); //true
}(50))

-3

To test if a variable is null or undefined I use the below code.

    if(sVal === '' || sVal === null ||typeof sVal === 'undefined'){
    console.log('variable is undefined or null');
    }
  • Close but no. Lose the typeof and compare to undefined straight out, not as a string. This works but the extra operator has no effect but to make it wordier. – temporary_user_name Apr 4 '16 at 16:09
  • In this case yes you are right we don't need to use typeof. But it's a good practice to use typeof when you are dealing with undefined variables. One reason to use typeof is that it does not throw an error if the variable has not been declared. – DanKodi Apr 5 '16 at 2:29
  • That's actually a bad thing. You don't want undeclared variables in your code. You want that to throw a ReferenceError so you can find the variable and declare it. Certainly you wouldn't try that in a compiled language like C++! Just because JS allows it doesn't mean it should be done. – temporary_user_name Apr 5 '16 at 4:21
  • 1
    Your or statement is backwards. Checking that something is undefined would be the first step, not the second. – Anthony Rutledge May 21 '16 at 15:32
-4

if(x==null) is bad idea in javascript,judge with "==" may cause unexpected type coercion, and can't be read by coffee-script, never use "==" or "!=" in condition judgment!

if(x) will be better.but becareful 0 and "", it will be treat as false,not equal method with "!= null" is true.

enter image description here

https://www.w3schools.com/js/js_best_practices.asp

  • 3
    This is completely incorrect, and cursory study of any professional-grade framework or software will substantiate that within moments. Using == to compare to null is the standard way of catching null and undefined in JS. Type coercion with == is not a risk in this specific context, and is in fact being taken advantage of to accomplish the goal of catching both null and undefined simultaneously. Please spend more time working with the language before electing to offer incorrect and misleading answers to questions which were satisfactorily resolved years ago. – temporary_user_name Aug 30 '17 at 15:48
  • avoid "==" . Everything is always keep changing , I don't aggree with you @Aerovistae – Albert.Qing Sep 2 '17 at 11:39
  • 3
    You don't disagree with me -- you disagree with the entire JavaScript establishment. Let's be clear. – temporary_user_name Sep 5 '17 at 15:12

protected by Tats_innit Oct 23 '13 at 21:42

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