8

I'm starting a number of coroutines with asio::spawn, and I want to wait until all of then are finished and do some other work then. How it can be done?

The control flow is following:

asio::spawn (io, [] (asio::yield_context yield) {
  ...
  // starting few coroutines
  asio::spawn (yield, [] (asio::yield_context yield2) { ... });
  asio::spawn (yield, [] (asio::yield_context yield2) { ... });
  asio::spawn (yield, [] (asio::yield_context yield2) { ... });
  asio::spawn (yield, [] (asio::yield_context yield2) { ... });

  // now I want to wait for all of them to finish before I do 
  // some other work?
  ...
});

io.run ();

UPDATE

Below is the sample code

#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/spawn.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/steady_timer.hpp>
#include <chrono>

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
  using namespace boost::asio;

  io_service io;

  spawn (io, [&] (yield_context yield) {
    cout << "main coro starts\n";

    auto lambda = [&] (yield_context yield)
      {
        cout << "in lambda inside subcoroutine - starts\n";
        steady_timer t (io, std::chrono::seconds (1));
        t.async_wait (yield);
        cout << "in lambda inside subcoroutine - finishes\n";
      };

    // starting few coroutines
    spawn (yield, lambda);
    spawn (yield, lambda);

    // now I want to wait for all of them to finish before I do
    // some other work?
    // ???

    cout << "main coro finishes\n";
  });

  io.run ();
}

And the output is:

// main coro starts
// in lambda inside subcoroutine - starts
// in lambda inside subcoroutine - starts
// main coro finishes <----
// in lambda inside subcoroutine - finishes
// in lambda inside subcoroutine - finishes

While I'm expecting:

// main coro starts
// in lambda inside subcoroutine - starts
// in lambda inside subcoroutine - starts
// in lambda inside subcoroutine - finishes
// in lambda inside subcoroutine - finishes
// main coro finishes

(see the place of "main coro finishes" line)

2
  • IIRC io.run (); just does what you want...
    – vines
    Commented Oct 21, 2014 at 10:22
  • @vines - no, it is not. Coliru Code Commented Oct 21, 2014 at 10:36

2 Answers 2

4

I found a ... sort of workaround.

I can use a timer with infinite duration, and cancel it from last sub-coroutine. This will wake up the main coroutine.

Coliru Example

#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/spawn.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/steady_timer.hpp>

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
  using namespace boost::asio;

  io_service io;

  spawn (io, [&] (yield_context yield) {
    cout << "main coro starts\n";


    steady_timer rendez_vous (io, steady_timer::clock_type::duration::max ());
    /* volatile */ int counter = 2;


    auto lambda = [&] (yield_context yield)
      {
        cout << "in lambda inside subcoroutine - starts\n";
        steady_timer t (io, boost::chrono::seconds (1));
        t.async_wait (yield);
        cout << "in lambda inside subcoroutine - finishes\n";

        if (--counter == 0)
            rendez_vous.cancel ();
      };

    // starting few coroutines
    spawn (yield, lambda);
    spawn (yield, lambda);

    // now I want to wait for all of them to finish before I do
    // some other work?
    // ???
    boost::system::error_code ignored_ec;
    rendez_vous.async_wait (yield [ignored_ec]);
    // ignore errors here by reason.

    cout << "main coro finishes\n";
  });

  io.run ();
}

Frankly I don't like this solution, because it abuses "timer" concept and object and it is a possible waste of system resources.

2
  • I like it anyways. Except for the abuse of volatile. If you want it thread-safe, use atomic_int. Otherwise, just leave it int
    – sehe
    Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 0:32
  • For what it is worth, I have used a timer as well when I had a similar need. It provides a fairly portable solution, and with a few higher-level classes that abstract the implementation, it provides a fairly clean solution. I believe counter can be a normal int, as all of those coroutines will run within the same strand with the appropriate memory barriers. Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 2:29
1

A better option would be using fibers (boost.fiber integrates into boost.asio). a boost::fiber is a coroutine + scheduler + synchronization classes (API like std::thread) and can be used in the boost.asio context like coroutines.

1
  • 1
    I'm aware about boost.fiber and it is very interesting. But is it ready to try for production tasks? What do you personally think about it? Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 11:20

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