2

In a similar fashion as the Fibonacci series may be generated as follows,

fibs :: [Integer]
fibs = 1 : 1 : zipWith (+) fibs (tail fibs)

how to define the series for factorial.

Update

Embarrassingly enough, tried this quite before adding this question,

Prelude> let factorial = 2 : 6 : zipWith(*) factorial (tail factorial)
Prelude> take 5 factorial
[2,6,12,72,864]

Indeed the numbers in the tail are not successive values, to start with.

  • 1
    What did you try? SO is not an exercise solving service, but we can prod in the right direction if you show some effort. – chi Oct 22 '14 at 12:30
  • 1
    factorials = <gap> : <gap> : zipWith (*) <gap> (tail factorials). Fill in the gaps. – Zeta Oct 22 '14 at 12:31
  • 1
    @chi, entirely agree; note update with unfruitful (embarrassing) attempt quite before formulating this question – elm Oct 22 '14 at 12:41
  • The attempt you did before is just like the Fibonacci series, just with multiplication, the list corresponds to 2^fib(i+1)*3^fib(i). – Petr Pudlák Oct 22 '14 at 18:05
7

Lets take a step back and remember where that lazy version actually comes from:

fib 0 = 1
fib 1 = 1
fib n = fib (n-1) + fib (n-2)

We can also define the factorial similarly:

factorial 0 = 1
factorial n = factorial (n - 1) * n

As you can see, our zipping operation is actually (*), and the second list won't be a sublist of factorials, but instead [x..] with an appropriate x:

factorials = 1 : zipWith (*) factorials [x..]

What value should x be? Well, the second element should be 1 = 1 * 1, so it's 1, naturally:

factorials = 1 : zipWith (*) factorials [1..]

Note that we only need to give the first element, since we don't use tail or something similar. As you can see, your attempt was almost correct. You just used the wrong values for the left hand side:

Prelude> let factorial = 2 : 6 : zipWith (*) [4..] (tail factorial)
Prelude> take 10 $ factorial
[2,6,24,120,720,5040,40320,362880,3628800,39916800]

Remark: The factorial sequence is 0!, 1!, 2!, ..., so if you want to be OEIS compliant start with [1,1,...].

  • The factorial sequence, as defined in A000142 of OEIS starts with [1, 1, 2, ...] not [2, ...]. Just saying. – Shoe Oct 22 '14 at 13:01
  • @Jefffrey: Fixed, thanks. – Zeta Oct 22 '14 at 13:06
  • Didactic explanation, thanks a heap! – elm Oct 22 '14 at 13:15
5

The idiomatic definition of a lazy list of factorials is not recursive at all: instead it uses the Prelude function scanl.

factorials = scanl (*) 1 [1..]
  • In Haskell 1.2 you could even write products [1..] :-) – yatima2975 Oct 22 '14 at 19:46
2

Given the usual definition of factorial:

factorial :: Integer -> Integer 
factorial 0 = 1
factorial i = foldr (*) 1 [2..i]

we can generate an infinite list of all factorials by simply running the factorial function over an infinite list of all positive numbers:

inFact :: [Integer]
inFact = map factorial [0..]

Live demo

  • Many Thanks for the ideas :) – elm Oct 22 '14 at 13:14

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