15

Let

int a = 0;

Then is (int)a an rvalue in standard C++?

Different compilers show different results for this code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void f(int& x)
{
    cout << "l value" << endl;
}

void f(int&& x)
{
    cout << "r value" << endl;
}

int main()
{
    int a = 0;
    f((int)a);
}

compilers with different results:

1) http://cpp.sh/2r6

2) http://webcompiler.cloudapp.net/

  • Has anyone checked to see if there is a connect bug yet? A cursory search did not turn one up. – Mgetz Oct 22 '14 at 13:53
  • @Mgetz I was looking, I have not found anything obvious though. – Shafik Yaghmour Oct 22 '14 at 13:56
  • Filed as a defect on connect against VS2013 using @ShafikYaghmour's test case – Mgetz Oct 22 '14 at 14:00
  • 1
    It's a long-standing "feature" of MSVC that a temporary is allowed to bind to a non-const reference. Turn it off with /Za option. – Igor Tandetnik Oct 22 '14 at 14:03
  • 3
    MS has finally responded, this is apparently controlled by /Zc:rvalueCast (Enforce type conversion rules) they have marked my bug as fixed. I'm still seeking clarification on if this will be turned on by default in the future. – Mgetz Nov 8 '14 at 14:02
10

The should be an rvalue but webcompiler is running Visual Studio and Visual Studio has an extension which allows temporary objects to be bound to non-const lvalue references. a bug/extension that casues it to generate an lvalue in this case As Igor points out above this can be disabled using /Za (see it live).

We can see that it should be an rvalue(specifically a prvalue) from the draft C++ standard section 5.4 Explicit type conversion (cast notation) paragraph 1 which says (emphasis mine):

The result of the expression (T) cast-expression is of type T. The result is an lvalue if T is an lvalue reference type or an rvalue reference to function type and an xvalue if T is an rvalue reference to object type; otherwise the result is a prvalue.[ Note: if T is a non-class type that is cv-qualified, the cv-qualifiers are ignored when determining the type of the resulting prvalue; see 3.10. —end note ]

Both gcc and clang result in rvalue which is the expected result.

As an aside, I would recommend using rextester over webcompiler since rextester allows you to share your program and also has live sharing.

Update

Ben Voigt point out this bug report and so it seems that Visual Studio actually produces an lvalue. So this is not simply a case of the extension which allows temporary objects to be bound to non-const lvalue references.

As dyp points out gcc used to have a cast to lvalue extension as well.

Update 2

Mgetz filed a bug report, the response was that this is fixed by using the /Zc:rvalueCast flag, the description of the flag is as follows:

When the /Zc:rvalueCast option is specified, the compiler correctly identifies an rvalue reference type as the result of a cast operation in accordance with the C++11 standard. When the option is not specified, the compiler behavior is the same as in Visual Studio 2012. By default, /Zc:rvalueCast is off. For conformance and to eliminate errors in the use of casts, we recommend that you use /Zc:rvalueCast.

It is unclear whether this flag will be enabled by default in future versions.

  • +1 for your recommendation. how long does the live sharing link lives? – user2029077 Oct 23 '14 at 1:52
  • @MinimusHeximus not sure, I have only used for short periods and th site does not document it. – Shafik Yaghmour Oct 23 '14 at 2:08
  • This answer is wrong, actually. Visual C++ isn't using the misfeature that binds an lvalue reference to a temporary.... it is completely failing to create a temporary at all. See Matt's answer and my bug report connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/Feedback/Details/615622 – Ben Voigt Oct 23 '14 at 3:03
  • 1
    The language extension that binds an rvalue to an lvalue-reference only works if there is an object; that's not true for prvalues of fundamental types rextester.com/TOJWJL48414. Strangely, gcc once had a similar "extension" that allowed the result of a cast to be used as an lvalue: gcc.gnu.org/gcc-3.4/changes.html (cast-as-lvalue) – dyp Oct 23 '14 at 9:50
  • 1
    I can only hypothesize that (char) i = 5; is more convenient to write than *((char*)&i) = 5; (in C). You can find some discussion when searching for "cast-as-lvalue". E.g. it seems to have been in early C89 drafts. – dyp Oct 23 '14 at 13:24
4

Yes, the result of a cast to an object type is an rvalue, as specified by C++11 5.4/1:

The result is an lvalue if T is an lvalue reference type or an rvalue reference to function type and an xvalue if T is an rvalue reference to object type; otherwise the result is a prvalue.

  • 6
    The key is that there is no rule making an exception for a cast from T to T. – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 22 '14 at 13:48
3

In Standard C++ int(a) and (int)a are rvalues (the other answers provide standard references).

Your code example is exploiting a bug/extension in MSVC, but not what it seems like at first glance. As we can see from this code which works in MSVC:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    int x = 0;
    (int)x = 1;
    std::cout << x << std::endl;
}

MSVC treats (int)x as an lvalue.

Even though MSVC has an extension to allow rvalues to bind to non-const references; that extension still makes rvalue references a better match than lvalue references for rvalues.

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