13

Is there an accepted "standard" way to format lambda-expressions in C++ >= 11 ? Especially when put in generic algorithms for instance.

For instance :

1)

auto it = std::find_if(myVec.begin(),
                       myVec.end(),
                       [id = 42] (const Element& e)
{ return e.id() == id;});

Or 2)

auto it = std::find_if(myVec.begin(),
                       myVec.end(),
                       [id = 42] 
                       (const Element& e)
                       { return e.id() == id;});

Or 3)

auto it = std::find_if(myVec.begin(),
                       myVec.end(),
                       [id = 42] (const Element& e)
                       { 
                           return e.id() == id;
                       });

Or 4)

auto it = std::find_if(myVec.begin(),
                       myVec.end(),
                       [id = 42] (const Element& e)
{ 
    return e.id() == id;
});

Or any other combination of carriage returns, spaces, tabs... Note : I use Allman style in my code, so ideally it would be "fitting in the same style".

  • No and note that I don't like any of those ;P – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 23 '14 at 17:18
  • 2
    Quite clearly a matter of opinion. I, for one, am not voting to close it, as I want to see the answers & votes. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Oct 23 '14 at 17:54
  • Option 4 is the worst in my opinion since it totally obfuscates that the block enclosed by the curly bracktes is a lambda body, first of all when the capture and params part of the lambda is written on the same line as the assignment to it. – mrt Mar 15 '18 at 10:01
11

I have always preferred to endow relative levels of indent with their own semantic value and vertically align a closing delimiter with the line that contains its matching opening delimiter. This makes complex statements (like those with lambda expressions as arguments) easier to read:

auto it = std::find_if(
  myVec.begin(),
  myVec.end(),
  [id = 42] (const Element& e){ return e.id() == id;}
);

or (if, for example, the lambda body was too long for one line)

auto it = std::find_if(
  myVec.begin(),
  myVec.end(),
  [id = 42] (const Element& e){ 
    return e.id() == id;
  }
);
  • 1
    I now go with your second example most of the time, and in a big codebase I find it to be the most legible. – Jean-Michaël Celerier Sep 13 '15 at 19:50
  • I have issues with that second example for really long lambdas. I recently came across a 50-line example that did this, and its really tough to notice that the code in this one particular level of indentation is not really part of the enclosing function at all. – T.E.D. Jun 24 '16 at 15:56
  • 6
    @T.E.D. If your lambda expression reaches 50 lines, then you have bigger problems than formatting. That much code probably deserves a name, at the very least. Probably more than one name. – Iron Savior Jun 24 '16 at 16:09
9

There is no de jure standard way yet. However, you can easily adopt your favorite C++ style. For example, an improvised Allman style:

        std::for_each(
            m_pages[i].begin() + m_pageSize,
            m_pages[i].end(),
            [this, i, &insertPlace](const CItemRef& item)
            {
                if(!item->IsOK())
                {
                    insertPlace = m_pages[i+1].insert(insertPlace, item);
                }
            }
        );

It is your number (3). Number (2) is usable for one-liners.

In my humble opinion, (1) and (4) break the spirit of indenting (they do not emphasize the logical structure of the whole lambda block). I would not use them.

  • It's nearly his #3, just with awful function call formatting fixed. – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 23 '14 at 17:19
  • #1 and #4 are how my IDE (QtCreator) does it when I auto-indent, which pisses me off, but since it seemed to be the default I put it here... – Jean-Michaël Celerier Oct 24 '14 at 7:57
  • This is not K&R this is Allman style. – Raspu Feb 6 '17 at 19:58
  • 1
    @Raspu Point taken! Thx! – Sergey K. Feb 6 '17 at 21:39
1

Personally, I don't like wasted whitespace on the left, so I like to put my multiple arguments with one extra level of standard indentation, starting on the next line:

auto it = std::find_if(
    myVec.begin(),
    myVec.end(),
    [id = 42](const Element& e) { return e.id() == id; }
    );

Or, for longer lambdas:

auto it = std::find_if(
    myVec.begin(),
    myVec.end(),
    [id = 42](const Element& e) { 
        return e.id() == id; 
    }
    );

So, regardless of function name length, my function arguments start at the same indent (in a scope) and this way there is more room for your lambda on the right.

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