Given a 2d Numpy array, I would like to be able to compute the diagonal for each row in the fastest way possible, I'm right now using a list comprehension but I'm wondering if it can be vectorised somehow?

For example using the following M array:

M = np.random.rand(5, 3)


[[ 0.25891593  0.07299478  0.36586996]
 [ 0.30851087  0.37131459  0.16274825]
 [ 0.71061831  0.67718718  0.09562581]
 [ 0.71588836  0.76772047  0.15476079]
 [ 0.92985142  0.22263399  0.88027331]]

I would like to compute the following array:

np.array([np.diag(row) for row in M])

array([[[ 0.25891593,  0.        ,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.07299478,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.36586996]],

       [[ 0.30851087,  0.        ,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.37131459,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.16274825]],

       [[ 0.71061831,  0.        ,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.67718718,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.09562581]],

       [[ 0.71588836,  0.        ,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.76772047,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.15476079]],

       [[ 0.92985142,  0.        ,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.22263399,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.88027331]]])
  • 1
    There may be a good reason that you need all of those diagonal matrices, but for large n you'll be wasting a whole bunch of space. I don't know what you're doing that would make diagonal matrices preferable over a vector containing the same information, but you might want to see if there is a way to do it with the compact representation of your data. – jme Oct 22 '14 at 16:07
  • I'm implementing a vectorised form of Von Kries chromatic adaptation transform: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – Kel Solaar Oct 22 '14 at 16:16
  • 1
    Sure, so in the end if all you need is multiplication of a matrix by a diagonal matrix, that's the same as broadcasting multiplication of a vector by a matrix. Though since your matrices will only ever be 3 columns wide, you aren't wasting too much space. Just a thought. – jme Oct 22 '14 at 16:27
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Despite the good answer of @ajcr, a much faster alternative can be achieved with fancy indexing (tested in NumPy 1.9.0):

import numpy as np

def sol0(M):
    return np.eye(M.shape[1]) * M[:,np.newaxis,:]

def sol1(M):
    b = np.zeros((M.shape[0], M.shape[1], M.shape[1]))
    diag = np.arange(M.shape[1])
    b[:, diag, diag] = M
    return b

where the timing shows this is approximately 4X faster:

M = np.random.random((1000, 3))
%timeit sol0(M)
#10000 loops, best of 3: 111 µs per loop
%timeit sol1(M)
#10000 loops, best of 3: 23.8 µs per loop
  • On my data with millions of rows the difference is not huge but it is still slightly faster, I will mark your answer as the accepted one. Thanks! – Kel Solaar Oct 23 '14 at 7:46
  • 1
    @KelSolaar which version of NumPy are you using? There was a significant in fancy indexing with version 1.9.0 – Saullo G. P. Castro Oct 23 '14 at 7:56
  • 1
    1.8.1 at the moment, most likely the reason why the speed gain is less than with your own tests. – Kel Solaar Oct 23 '14 at 8:04
  • 1
    Good to see a quicker method (+1)! It's just a slight improvement for me too on 1.8.0: time for me to upgrade my NumPy version... – Alex Riley Oct 23 '14 at 11:18
  • 3
    On numpy 1.8 you will probably get more bang for the buck using slicing: b = np.zeros((M.shape[0], M.shape[1]*M.shape[1])); b[:, ::M.shape[1]+1] = M; return b.reshape(M.shape[0], M.shape[1], M.shape[1]). In 1.9 the difference with Saullo's answer are very small, although it is a tad faster for very large arrays. – Jaime Oct 23 '14 at 21:07

Here's one way using element-wise multiplication of np.eye(3) (the 3x3 identity array) and a slightly re-shaped M:

>>> M = np.random.rand(5, 3)
>>> np.eye(3) * M[:,np.newaxis,:]
array([[[ 0.42527357,  0.        ,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.17557419,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.61920924]],

       [[ 0.04991268,  0.        ,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.74000307,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.34541354]],

       [[ 0.71464307,  0.        ,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.11878955,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.65411844]],

       [[ 0.01699954,  0.        ,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.39927673,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.14378892]],

       [[ 0.5209439 ,  0.        ,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.34520876,  0.        ],
        [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.53862677]]])

(By "re-shaped M" I mean that the rows of M are made to face out along the z-axis rather than across the y-axis, giving M the shape (5, 1, 3).)

  • Brilliant, exactly what I wanted, more than 7 times faster in my use case. – Kel Solaar Oct 22 '14 at 16:20

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