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I was watching the second part of Walter Brown's CppCon2014 talk on template metaprogramming, during which he discussed the uses of his novel void_t<> construction. During his presentation Peter Sommerlad asked him a question that I didn't quite understand. (link goes directly to the question, the code under discussion took place directly before that)

Sommerlad asked

Walter, would that mean we actually can implement concepts lite right now?

to which Walter responded

Oh yeah! I've done it ... It doesn't have quite the same syntax.

I understood this exchange to be about Concepts Lite. Is this pattern really that versatile? For whatever reason, I am not seeing it. Can someone explain (or sketch) how something like this might look? Is this just about enable_if and defining traits, or what was the questioner referring to?

The void_t template is defined as follows:

template<class ...> using void_t = void;

He uses this then to detect if type statements are well formed, using this to implement the is_copy_assignable type trait:

//helper type
template<class T>
using copy_assignment_t
= decltype(declval<T&>() = declval<T const&>());

//base case template
template<class T, class=void>
struct is_copy_assignable : std::false_type {};

//SFINAE version only for types where copy_assignment_t<T> is well-formed.
template<class T>
struct is_copy_assignable<T, void_t<copy_assignment_t<T>>> 
: std::is_same<copy_assignment_t<T>,T&> {};

Because of the talk, I understand how this example works, but I don't see how we get from here to something like Concepts Lite.

  • 2
    Interesting question, unfortunately it's not really any different from the "please take a look at my source code, hosted on (some repository)" variety. Only worse, because it is a video. Could you possible add relevant code snippets to your question so that it becomes more standalone? At a minimum, specify the time within the video you are talking about, "the second part" is almost useless. – Ben Voigt Oct 22 '14 at 17:12
  • 1
    @BenVoigt Okay, I updated the question. There is a time code in the youtube link that skips directly to the question. And I added the primary example he used in his presentation. I hope that made the question more clear. – Tim Seguine Oct 22 '14 at 17:29
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    You can't get from there to Concepts Lite. It's a cool technique and you can use it for nice "requires" clauses in template parameter lists, but you can't get the compiler to impose a partial ordering on templates based on which "concept" is more refined. You also can't impose requirements on non-template member functions of a class template, or several of the other entirely new language features that are part of the Concepts TS. – Jonathan Wakely Oct 22 '14 at 19:07
  • 1
    @JonathanWakely okay, are these "requires" clauses you speak of(our fake ones) just dressed up enable_if with more accessible and easily written constraints and type traits, or is it something more complicated? – Tim Seguine Oct 22 '14 at 19:10
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    Yes, I believe it's just a very cool way to do SFINAE. Concepts Lite is a lot more than SFINAE, it completely replaces SFINAE, instead of dressing it up with nice syntax. – Jonathan Wakely Oct 22 '14 at 19:29
116

Yes, concepts lite basically dresses up SFINAE. Plus it allows deeper introspection to allow for better overloading. However that only works if the concept predicates are defined as concept bool. The improved overloading does not work with the current concept predicates, but conditional overloading can be used. Lets look how we can define predicates, constrain templates, and overload functions in C++14. This is kind of long, but it goes over how to create all of the tools needed to accomplish this in C++14.

Defining Predicates

First, it is kind of ugly to read the predicate with all the std::declval and decltype everywhere. Instead, we can take advantage of the fact that we can constrain a function using a trailing decltype(from Eric Niebler’s blog post here), like this:

struct Incrementable
{
    template<class T>
    auto requires_(T&& x) -> decltype(++x);
};

So if ++x is not valid, then the requires_ member function is not callable. So we can create a models trait that just checks if requires_ is callable using void_t:

template<class Concept, class Enable=void>
struct models
: std::false_type
{};

template<class Concept, class... Ts>
struct models<Concept(Ts...), void_t< 
    decltype(std::declval<Concept>().requires_(std::declval<Ts>()...))
>>
: std::true_type
{};

Constraining Templates

So when we want to constrain the template based on the concept, we will still need to use enable_if, but we can use this macro to help make it cleaner:

#define REQUIRES(...) typename std::enable_if<(__VA_ARGS__), int>::type = 0

So we can define an increment function that is constrained based on Incrementable concept:

template<class T, REQUIRES(models<Incrementable(T)>())>
void increment(T& x)
{
    ++x;
}

So if we call increment with something that is not Incrementable, we will get an error like this:

test.cpp:23:5: error: no matching function for call to 'incrementable'
    incrementable(f);
    ^~~~~~~~~~~~~
test.cpp:11:19: note: candidate template ignored: disabled by 'enable_if' [with T = foo]
template<class T, REQUIRES(models<Incrementable(T)>())>
                  ^

Overloading Functions

Now if we want to do overloading, we want to use conditional overloading. Say we want to create an std::advance using concept predicates, we could define it like this(for now we will ignore the decrementable case):

struct Incrementable
{
    template<class T>
    auto requires_(T&& x) -> decltype(++x);
};

struct Advanceable
{
    template<class T, class I>
    auto requires_(T&& x, I&& i) -> decltype(x += i);
};

template<class Iterator, REQUIRES(models<Advanceable(Iterator, int)>())>
void advance(Iterator& it, int n)
{
    it += n;
}

template<class Iterator, REQUIRES(models<Incrementable(Iterator)>())>
void advance(Iterator& it, int n)
{
    while (n--) ++it;
}

However, this causes an ambiguous overload(In concepts lite this would still be an ambiguous overload unless we change our predicates to refer to the other predicates in a concept bool) when its used with std::vector iterator. What we want to do is order the calls, which we can do using conditional overloading. It can be thought of writing something like this(which is not valid C++):

template<class Iterator>
void advance(Iterator& it, int n) if (models<Advanceable(Iterator, int)>())
{
    it += n;
} 
else if (models<Incrementable(Iterator)>())
{
    while (n--) ++it;
}

So if the first function isn't called, it will call the next function. So lets start by implementing it for two functions. We will create a class called basic_conditional which accepts two function objects as template parameters:

struct Callable
{
    template<class F, class... Ts>
    auto requires_(F&& f, Ts&&... xs) -> decltype(
        f(std::forward<Ts>(xs)...)
    );
};

template<class F1, class F2>
struct basic_conditional
{
    // We don't need to use a requires clause here because the trailing
    // `decltype` will constrain the template for us.
    template<class... Ts>
    auto operator()(Ts&&... xs) -> decltype(F1()(std::forward<Ts>(xs)...))
    {
        return F1()(std::forward<Ts>(xs)...);
    }
    // Here we add a requires clause to make this function callable only if
    // `F1` is not callable.
    template<class... Ts, REQUIRES(!models<Callable(F1, Ts&&...)>())>
    auto operator()(Ts&&... xs) -> decltype(F2()(std::forward<Ts>(xs)...))
    {
        return F2()(std::forward<Ts>(xs)...);
    }
};

So now that means we need to define our functions as functions objects instead:

struct advance_advanceable
{
    template<class Iterator, REQUIRES(models<Advanceable(Iterator, int)>())>
    void operator()(Iterator& it, int n) const
    {
        it += n;
    }
};

struct advance_incrementable
{
    template<class Iterator, REQUIRES(models<Incrementable(Iterator)>())>
    void operator()(Iterator& it, int n) const
    {
        while (n--) ++it;
    }
};

static conditional<advance_advanceable, advance_incrementable> advance = {};

So now if we try to use it with an std::vector:

std::vector<int> v = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };
auto iterator = v.begin();
advance(iterator, 4);
std::cout << *iterator << std::endl;

It will compile and print out 5.

However, std::advance actually has three overloads, so we can use the basic_conditional to implement conditional that works for any number of functions using recursion:

template<class F, class... Fs>
struct conditional : basic_conditional<F, conditional<Fs...>>
{};

template<class F>
struct conditional<F> : F
{};

So, now we can write the full std::advance like this:

struct Incrementable
{
    template<class T>
    auto requires_(T&& x) -> decltype(++x);
};

struct Decrementable
{
    template<class T>
    auto requires_(T&& x) -> decltype(--x);
};

struct Advanceable
{
    template<class T, class I>
    auto requires_(T&& x, I&& i) -> decltype(x += i);
};

struct advance_advanceable
{
    template<class Iterator, REQUIRES(models<Advanceable(Iterator, int)>())>
    void operator()(Iterator& it, int n) const
    {
        it += n;
    }
};

struct advance_decrementable
{
    template<class Iterator, REQUIRES(models<Decrementable(Iterator)>())>
    void operator()(Iterator& it, int n) const
    {
        if (n > 0) while (n--) ++it;
        else 
        {
            n *= -1;
            while (n--) --it;
        }
    }
};

struct advance_incrementable
{
    template<class Iterator, REQUIRES(models<Incrementable(Iterator)>())>
    void operator()(Iterator& it, int n) const
    {
        while (n--) ++it;
    }
};

static conditional<advance_advanceable, advance_decrementable, advance_incrementable> advance = {};

Overloading With Lambdas

However, additionally, we could use lambdas to write it instead of function objects which can help make it cleaner to write. So we use this STATIC_LAMBDA macro to construct lambdas at compile time:

struct wrapper_factor
{
    template<class F>
    constexpr wrapper<F> operator += (F*)
    {
        return {};
    }
};

struct addr_add
{
    template<class T>
    friend typename std::remove_reference<T>::type *operator+(addr_add, T &&t) 
    {
        return &t;
    }
};

#define STATIC_LAMBDA wrapper_factor() += true ? nullptr : addr_add() + []

And add a make_conditional function that is constexpr:

template<class... Fs>
constexpr conditional<Fs...> make_conditional(Fs...)
{
    return {};
}

Then we can now write the advance function like this:

constexpr const advance = make_conditional(
    STATIC_LAMBDA(auto& it, int n, REQUIRES(models<Advanceable(decltype(it), int)>()))
    {
        it += n;
    },
    STATIC_LAMBDA(auto& it, int n, REQUIRES(models<Decrementable(decltype(it))>()))
    {
        if (n > 0) while (n--) ++it;
        else 
        {
            n *= -1;
            while (n--) --it;
        }
    },
    STATIC_LAMBDA(auto& it, int n, REQUIRES(models<Incrementable(decltype(it))>()))
    {
        while (n--) ++it;
    }
);

Which is little more compact and readable than using the function object versions.

Additionally, we could define a modeled function to reduce down the decltype ugliness:

template<class Concept, class... Ts>
constexpr auto modeled(Ts&&...)
{
    return models<Concept(Ts...)>();
}

constexpr const advance = make_conditional(
    STATIC_LAMBDA(auto& it, int n, REQUIRES(modeled<Advanceable>(it, n)))
    {
        it += n;
    },
    STATIC_LAMBDA(auto& it, int n, REQUIRES(modeled<Decrementable>(it)))
    {
        if (n > 0) while (n--) ++it;
        else 
        {
            n *= -1;
            while (n--) --it;
        }
    },
    STATIC_LAMBDA(auto& it, int n, REQUIRES(modeled<Incrementable>(it)))
    {
        while (n--) ++it;
    }
);

Finally, if you are interested in using existing library solutions(rather than rolling your own like I've shown). There is the Tick library that provides a framework for defining concepts and constraining templates. And the Fit library can handle the functions and overloading.

  • 2
    Thanks for taking the time to write such an extensive answer. This is more than I expected, but exactly the sort of answer I had hoped for. – Tim Seguine Oct 23 '14 at 18:03
  • 1
    upvoted due to high quality and quantity... but OMG my C++11 nausea is kicking in. – Jason S Oct 23 '14 at 20:18
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    FWIW, the trick used to implement STATIC_LAMBDA is not standards compliant C++. It works in practice because a system would have to be pretty strange for it not to work, but that doesn't make it 100% Kosher. – Charphacy Oct 24 '14 at 7:29
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    @mattnewport Yes, It matches a function type where the Ts... match the function parameters and Concept matches the return type of the function type. – Paul Fultz II Oct 29 '14 at 16:03
  • 2
    Ah, ok, I think I get it now. What threw me was not seeing where a function with that signature was coming from but there never actually is such a function, it's just a convenient syntax to pattern match the types. Clever. – mattnewport Oct 29 '14 at 16:53

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