7

I realized that I should have only one instance of an object called StdSchedulerFactory running at a time. So far I instantiated the object like this

StdSchedulerFactory sf = new StdSchedulerFactory(properties);

And properties is a NameValueCollection. How can I write a Singleton class for this object so that the variable sf will always have one instance throughout the program?

6
  • 1
    Are you asking How to implement a singleton or Examples
    – Nyra
    Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 17:16
  • What would happen if someone instantiated a second one? Would it be so bad that you'd rather not have proper unit testing instead?
    – nvoigt
    Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 17:18
  • @nvoigt Its perfectly possible to unit-test a singleton, it just needs to derive a interface; then you can mock it for testing other objects, and when you test it, it being a singleton doesn't matter. (Note you need a DI container for this to work). Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 17:19
  • @BradleyDotNET How would you unit test a singleton, if your tests influence each other? Would you build a single, monolithic test case calling all operations the class can have? (Not talking about singleton lifetime of a normal class in a DI container, but a real, private-constructor singleton)
    – nvoigt
    Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 17:21
  • 1
    @nvoigt If that kind of class exists, I probably wouldn't make it a singleton. If it did need to be a singleton, then yes, a "monolithic" test makes the most sense. Not ideal, but I think singleton gets a bad rap sometimes. I have singletons in my code and my unit tests are perfectly reasonable. Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 17:22

3 Answers 3

9

Part of the Singleton pattern is typically a private constructor, so that other classes can not make new instances.

The workaround for parameters coming from outside the class is to add a "Init" or "Configure" function:

public static void Configure(NameValueCollection properties)
{
}

Of course, if you forget to call this function, you may get behavior you don't want; so you may want to set a "Configured" flag or something like that so your other functions can react appropriately if this function has not yet been called.

4
  • I am sorry but I don't really understand this. Could you tell me how your Configure function must be used in my case? Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 17:38
  • @Pedram Its just a public method in the singleton class. You call it sometime near program startup (preferably before any methods that depend on the argument are called). Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 17:44
  • @BradleyDotNET is this some times something that is required by a Singleton, i.e. this solves what I need to do (+1), but I don't want to "go against the grain"? Is this an uncommon practice?
    – Thomas
    Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 14:52
  • @Thomas It is not required by the idiomatic Singleton. You could do the same thing by exposing properties that other people set. This is just the closest analog to a paramterized constructor. As to this being uncommon practice, no I would think this is very common. Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 15:16
2

Here is a basic Singleton implementation. It is not thread-safe.

public sealed class StdSchedulerFactory
{
   private static readonly StdSchedulerFactory instance;
   private NameValueCollection _properties;

   private StdSchedulerFactory(NameValueCollection properties)
   {
       _properties = properties;
   }

   public static StdSchedulerFactory GetInstance(NameValueCollection properties)
   {
      if (instance == null)
      {
         instance = new StdSchedulerFactory(properties);
      }
      else
      {
         return instance;
      }
   }
}
4
  • 1
    Worth noting though is adding a readonly object at the top is an easy way to make it threadsafe (and the appropriate locks around properties/methods).
    – Nyra
    Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 17:22
  • 2
    You probably meant to pass properties. I hate this pattern... that means I pass a set of properties, but I get an instance created with a totally different set of properties. I hate methods that lie to me.
    – nvoigt
    Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 17:27
  • yep, missed that. i agree, there are better ways.
    – Cam Bruce
    Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 17:29
  • @CamBruce I get two errors with this: StdSchedulerFactory does not contain a constructor that takes 1 argument when I try to instantiate it like in the question. And second "a static readonly field cannot be assigned to (except in a static constructor or a variable initializer)." Commented Oct 22, 2014 at 17:33
1

this is my two favorite way implementing simple singleton pattern. The second one is just easier when debugging :)

public sealed class SingletonOne
{
    private static readonly Lazy<SingletonOne> instance = new Lazy<SingletonOne>(() => new SingletonOne());

    private Lazy<Controller> controller = new Lazy<Controller>(() => new Controller(properties));

    private static object properties = null;

    public static SingletonOne Instance { get { return instance.Value; } }

    public Controller GetController(object properties)
    {
        SingletonOne.properties = properties;

        return this.controller.Value;
    }
}

public sealed class SingletonTwo
{
    private static readonly SingletonTwo instance = new SingletonTwo();

    private Controller controller;

    private static object properties = null;

    public static SingletonTwo Instance
    { 
        get 
        { 
            return SingletonTwo.instance; 
        } 
    }

    public Controller GetController(object properties)
    {
        SingletonTwo.properties = properties;

        if(this.controller == null)
        {
            this.controller = new Controller(SingletonTwo.properties);
        }

        return this.controller;
    }
}

public class Controller 
{
    public Controller(object properties) { }
}

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