0

I have this test code example:

public class Test {

    private static class Test3 {

        private void print1() {
            System.out.println("1");
        }
    }
    private static class Test4 extends Test3 {

        private void print1() {
            System.out.println("2");
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Overriden call to private method ----------------");
        OuterTest.Test1 test1 = new OuterTest.Test1();
        OuterTest.Test2 test2 = new OuterTest.Test2();
        OuterTest.Test1 test12 = new OuterTest.Test2();

        test1.invokeOverriden();
        test2.invokeOverriden();
        test12.invokeOverriden();

        System.out.println("Call to private method from parent class ----------------");

        test1.invokeNotOverriden();
        test2.invokeNotOverriden();
        test12.invokeNotOverriden();

        System.out.println(" Some magic ----------------");

        Test3 test3 = new Test3();
        Test4 test4 = new Test4();
        Test3 test34 = new Test4();

        test3.print1();
        test4.print1();
        test34.print1();
    }
}

class OuterTest {

    public static class Test1 {
        public void invokeOverriden() {
            print1();
        }
        public void invokeNotOverriden() {
            print1();
        }

        private void print1() {
            System.out.println("1");
        }
    }

    public static class Test2 extends Test1 {

        @Override
        public void invokeOverriden() {
            print1();
        }
        private void print1() {
            System.out.println("2");
        }
    }
}

First, all works as I think it should:

Overriden call to private method ----------------
1
2
2

Then, inherited class's private method dissapears, if I called non-implemented parent method. It could be explained as "All private methods are final and hidden from derived classes", so invokeNotOverriden() doesn't know anything about methods in Test2 class:

Call to private method from parent class ----------------
1
1
1

Finally, in static class some magic suddenly appears when I call non-static private method:

Some magic ----------------
1
2
1

I expected 1 2 2 here. Why am I wrong?

  • 2
    You can't override private methods - simply, as that. – Smutje Oct 23 '14 at 8:10
  • I know. And I don't override private methods. I created class object as Base b = new Inherited() and called its private method. I think, b is an Inherited now. Why is it not true? – Aguinore Oct 23 '14 at 8:13
2

You've got 1 2 1 in some magic section, because private methods are resolved w/o polymorphism, compiler creates call to method contained in type variable declared with, in your case Test3. Declare print1 as non-private in Test3 (and, consequently, in Test4 as it's prohibited to tighten access modifiers of methods) and see polymorphism in action, so you'll get expected 1 2 2.


Consider shorter example:

class Test {

    private static class Test3 {
        private void print1() {
            System.out.println("non-polymorphic 1");
        }

        void polymorphic() {
            System.out.println("polymorphic 1");
        }
    }

    private static class Test4 extends Test3 {
        private void print1() {
            System.out.println("non-polymorphic 2");
        }

        void polymorphic() {
            System.out.println("polymorphic 2");
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test4 t4 = new Test4();
        t4.print1();
        t4.polymorphic();

        System.out.println("======");

        Test3 t34 = new Test4();
        t34.print1();
        t34.polymorphic();
    }
}

CLARIFICATION ... to my comment to this answer: polymorphism isn't effective for access to data fields, only for methods. Consider:

private static class Test3 {
    int i = 1;
}

private static class Test4 extends Test3 {
    int i = 2;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Test4 t4 = new Test4();
    System.out.println(t4.i);

    System.out.println("======");

    Test3 t34 = new Test4();
    System.out.println(t34.i);
}

Despite i declared non-private, t34.i value is 1.

  • test34.getClass() shows Test$Test4 as its class, not Test3. – Aguinore Oct 23 '14 at 8:29
  • 1
    This is dynamic resolution (polymorphic) of a class, and it's accounted for only for access to non-private members (both data and methods). For private data/methods, access is done using type as it's used in your program. – Victor Sorokin Oct 23 '14 at 8:32
  • 1
    so static isn't a root of magic here, if I understood you right. Only private method modifier. Thanks. – Aguinore Oct 23 '14 at 8:35
1

Private methods are only available to the class which declares them, not the children of that class.

If you want a method from a parent-class to be used in a child, you have to make it protected.

In your last case, you casted to Test3, so for all intents and purposes, that class thinks it's Test3 and calls Test3's print method. Static instances are not cast (you always call them with their qualified name), so they always call their own private methods.

  • About last case it is. But first time, without static, test12 calls Test2 private method, not Test1 – Aguinore Oct 23 '14 at 8:18
0

It's just like you said, you can't override a private method, make it protected

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.