5

Where do the basic validators lie when dealing with Form objects and regular Rails models?

Following the concept of decoupling forms from the persistence layer in Rails. I've setup a Form Object Cage that creates two objects together... say Animal and Plant.

Following Form Object examples from http://blog.codeclimate.com/blog/2012/10/17/7-ways-to-decompose-fat-activerecord-models/ or https://github.com/solnic/virtus or https://github.com/makandra/active_type , each of these show the Form object itself has validations... no problem... part of the benefits include being able to validate objects in a more contextually aware way.

The issue:

class Animal < ActiveRecord::Base

  validates :color, presence: true
  validate :only_one_brown

  private

  def only_one_brown
    if some_complex_thing
      errors.add(:color, 'can not have more than one brown animal.')
    end
  end
end

class Plant < ActiveRecord::Base
  validates :color, presence: true
end

class Cage
  include Virtus.model # or ActiveType or whatever
  include ActiveModel::Validations

  attribute :bird_color, String
  attribute :plant_color, String

  validates :bird_color, presence: true
  validates :plant_color, presence: true

  def save
    if valid?
      animal.save!
      plant.save!
      true
    else
      false
    end
  end

  def animal
    @animal ||= Animal.new(color: bird_color)
  end

  def plant
    @plant ||= Plant.new(color: plant_color)
  end
end

How do I validate animal's "only one brown" rule without:

  1. Too much duplication.
  2. A lot of code to make Cage still act like an AR model

If we don't duplicate the validation code, when "only one brown" is false, Cage doesn't have an error for it... we'll raise, which requires the controller to catch and handle, which is bad.

If we do duplicate the code, and if there are several custom validations, we're duplicating a lot of code and each other form object that deals with Animal needs the duplicated validations now.

If we move the validation code out of Animal into Cage entirely, similar issue: all objects that interact with Animal need to know about the "only one brown" rule, which is just duplicating validators and opening up an easy way to forget to enforce it somewhere.

If we move Animal's error array up to Cage's, Animal's error is on :color, which is ambiguous to Cage, and shows an error on an attribute name the client never sent in. If you want to map Animal's error keys to Cage's, now you need to keep an map for each Form Object, feels stinky.

Are there any good patterns or ways to deal with this situation? I feel like it is very common when you start using Form Objects but all examples are quite trivial.

Thanks in advance!

2
0

At the end of point 3 on http://blog.codeclimate.com/blog/2012/10/17/7-ways-to-decompose-fat-activerecord-models/ the author says: "As a bonus, since validation logic is often contextual, it can be defined in the place exactly where it matters instead of needing to guard validations in the ActiveRecord itself." I'm agree with Bryan Helmkamp, puts the validation where it matters, you don't need to duplicate it.

edited:

If I were you, I'll put the validation only on the ActiveRecord model. And I'll update the Cage class:

def save
  if valid?
    ActiveRecord::Base.transaction do
      animal.save!
      plant.save!
    end
    true
  else
    false
  end
rescue Exception => exception
  raise if valid?
  false
end

And I'll add an errors method that returns the errors of Cage, Plant and Animal instances.

edited:

I think you can redefine the valid? method, and then errors works fine:

class Cage
  include ActiveModel::Model

  def valid_with_mymodels?
    valid_without_mymodels? && animal.valid? && plant.valid?
    animal.errors.each do |attribute, error|
      self.errors.add :"bird_#{attribute.to_s}", error
    end
    plant.errors.each do |attribute, error|
      self.errors.add :"plant_#{attribute.to_s}", error
    end
    errors.empty?
  end
  alias_method_chain :valid?, :mymodels

  ...

end

Just, be careful with the name of your attrs.

I'm not sure how works Virtus, with Rails 4 you can use ActiveModel::Model, if using rails 3 I need research.

edited:

If you are using Rails 3.2, you can't use ActiveModel::Model, but you get the same with this:

class Cage
  extend ActiveModel::Naming
  include ActiveModel::Conversion
  include ActiveModel::Validations

  ... 

end
3
  • That's sort of the essence of the question... it matters in both places. It matters on the model itself because it needs to be enforced everywhere the model is used, but it also matters on the form object, which needs to act like an AR model for the controllers/UI. To have the validations in both places... validations that require SQL lookups or computation in some way... seems unpleasant, but unavoidable.
    – Greg Olsen
    Oct 26 '14 at 19:38
  • Added a more obvious code example of what I'm trying to say.
    – Greg Olsen
    Oct 26 '14 at 21:01
  • Thanks Alejandro, I've taken a look at that route but what if only brown fails to validate... animal.errors now contains { :color => 'only one brown allowed' }. If this is passed up to Cage, :color is not an attribute of cage, which color is it... :bird_color... so the handling becomes quite complex because now you need to know that animal returns :color when it means :bird_color for Cage, etc. and the form would not see an error on :bird_color unless we mapped the columns between the two.
    – Greg Olsen
    Oct 27 '14 at 9:05

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