5

I'm trying to write tests for code that I didn't write that uses ui-router.

I can't figure out a way to inject a controller into my test since it is written inline and anonymously within a state configured within another controller:

$scope.deleteSomething = function() {
  $modal.open(
    templateUrl: '/delete-item-modal.html',
    controller: ['$scope', '$modalInstance', 'someService', 
      function($scope, $modalInstance, someService) {
        ....
      }
    ],
    resolve: {
      ...
    }
  });  
};

If the controller was named something like controller: 'TheController' I would have no problem injecting it by doing like this in my test:

beforeEach(inject(function($controller) {
  $controller('TheController', {/*dependancies to be injected*/});
}));

But since the controller is anonymous, I don't have a handle to it and can't figure out how to access it.

  • So, you have the answer: refactor the controller into a named controller, to make it testable. – JB Nizet Oct 24 '14 at 15:04
  • @Jb Nizet yes, but I'm trying to avoid that since it's not my code and would rather not refactor it. That would be a last resort. – Noam Oct 24 '14 at 15:09
  • I know that this doesn't solve your problem, but if it's not your code, and you're not allowed to modify it, then you shouldn't unit-test it. The developer who wrote the code should be the one testing it. – JB Nizet Oct 24 '14 at 15:10
  • I am allowed to modify it, but would like to know if that is necessary as refactoring it may have potential pitfalls. But generally, I do agree that the dev who writes the code should write the unit tests. I'm doing a job that was given to me. – Noam Oct 24 '14 at 15:16
0

This is an untenable situation. You should unit test code that you're preparing to modify, to guard against regressions. If you cannot unit test it in its current state then your only choice is to integration test it. Explain to the person requesting the work:

  • You must write tests for the code prior to modifying it.
  • Integration testing will take longer, but is the only thing possible due to the structure of the code.
  • Refactoring by extracting a named controller is a copy-paste and low-risk.
  • A named controller can be unit tested easily.

That's what I'm going to do.

0

You can test an anonymous controller. Instead of passing the controller identifier to the $controller(...) function, you have to pass the controller constructor array itself.

To do this you'll need to make the controller code accessible to your unit test code. This is often done using a modularization tool for JavaScript (e.g. Webpack). But it can be done within your testing config and <script></script> tag ordering. I recommend using a tool.

Regardless, you end up with three files:

// delete-item-controller.js

DeleteItemController = ['$scope', '$modalInstance', 'someService', 
  function($scope, $modalInstance, someService) {
    ....
  }
];

// state-controller.js

$scope.deleteSomething = function() {
    $modal.open(
        templateUrl: '/delete-item-modal.html',
        controller: DeleteItemController,
        resolve: {
          ...
        }
    });  
};

// delete-item-controller.spec.js

beforeEach(inject(function($controller) {
    $controller(DeleteItemController, {/*dependancies to be injected*/});
}));

Alternative example, using module loader

Using Webpack it would look a little different... but it eliminates the icky, implied global object that holds onto DeleteItemController.

// delete-item-controller.js

module.exports = ['$scope', '$modalInstance', 'someService', 
  function($scope, $modalInstance, someService) {
    ....
  }
];

// state-controller.js

var DeleteItemController = require("./delete-item-controller");

$scope.deleteSomething = function() {
    $modal.open(
        templateUrl: '/delete-item-modal.html',
        controller: DeleteItemController,
        resolve: {
          ...
        }
    });  
};

// delete-item-controller.spec.js

var DeleteItemController = require("./delete-item-controller");

beforeEach(inject(function($controller) {
    $controller(DeleteItemController, {/*dependancies to be injected*/});
}));

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