2

I'm querying an Oracle db for my MVC project and I found something in my SQL that I was curious about. Why does this Query not return rows where the VALIDATED_BY Column is NULL?

SELECT *
FROM DM_SSA_DEV.REQUESTS
WHERE BATCH_ID = 1399
AND VALIDATED_BY <> 'AUTOUSER'

When I commented out the last line I got my expected 481 results:

SELECT *
FROM DM_SSA_DEV.REQUESTS
WHERE BATCH_ID = 1399
--AND VALIDATED_BY <> 'AUTOUSER'

Finally I found I could circumvent this issue via explicitly handling the NULLs. Was this the right thing to do or was there a better way, and why?

SELECT *
FROM DM_SSA_DEV.REQUESTS
WHERE BATCH_ID = 1399
AND (VALIDATED_BY <> 'AUTOUSER' OR VALIDATED_BY IS NULL)

P.S. I'm also really using Linq in my project so this is the code I used. Most efficient?

db.REQUESTS.Where(r => r.BATCH_ID == batchId && (r.VALIDATED_BY != "AUTOUSER" || r.VALIDATED_BY == NULL)).ToList<REQUEST>();
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  • 1
    if you need null safe "operator" in Oracle see LNNVL – Multisync Oct 24 '14 at 19:06
7

NULL is never equal (=) to any other value, even another NULL (it is a bit like floating-point NaN). This also includes not equal expressions involving NULL.

The intent can be expressed as x = y OR (y IS NULL and x IS NULL), when NULL values are to be considered equal.

The special case of not-equal or NULL-and-not-equal is x <> y OR x IS NULL, assuming y is never NULL.

Another option is to coalesce, COALESCE(x, '*') = COALESCE(y, '*'), depending on how much the optimizer is trusted and the equality of the coalesced value to NULL. There may also be other vendor extensions.

LINQ/EF will translate x == null (C#, null must be a constant expression) to x IS NULL (SQL).

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  • +1 for using COALESCE, Standard SQL, vs NVL, vendor specific. – Sebas Oct 24 '14 at 19:10
  • Would COALESCE() be more or less expensive then just implicitly handling the Nulls like I did above? I'm using Asynchronous calls, so I'm trying to save as much time as possible with this large DataTable – Grim Coder Oct 24 '14 at 19:11
  • 1
    @GrimCoder I would use the explicit null handling, probably the second form since the actual operation is <> and y is known not to be NULL. It is cleaner and shorter to write here. I would also trust it to be better optimized (read: not botched) by basic query planners. – user2864740 Oct 24 '14 at 19:13
  • Great. Thanks for you input, suggestions, and explanations. I know this is a fairly basic post, just wanted to clarify so I could enhance my best practices – Grim Coder Oct 24 '14 at 19:17

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