21

I have solved a topCoder problem for which all the tests pass when I run them on their own. Nonetheless when I run the whole test class some of them fail. Could you, please, help me identify the reason for this behaviour? Here is my class and my tests:

 package com.topcoder.div2.stage1;

import java.util.Arrays;

public class GameOfStones {
    private int iterations = 0;
    public int count(int[] stones){
        int result = checkEquality(stones);
        return result;
    }

    private int checkEquality(int[] stones){
        int count = 0;
        int sum = 0;
        for(int k = 0; k< stones.length;k++){
            sum += stones[k];
        }
        if(stones.length > 0) {
            for (int i = 0; i < sum; i++) {
                Arrays.sort(stones);
                if(stones[stones.length-1] != 3) {
                    int j = 0;
                    while (j < stones.length - 1) {
                        if (stones[j] == stones[j + 1]) {
                            count++;
                        }
                        j++;
                    }
                    if (count == stones.length - 1) {
                        return iterations;
                    }
                    stones[0] = stones[0] + 2;
                    stones[stones.length - 1] = stones[stones.length - 1] - 2;
                    iterations++;
                    count = 0;
                }
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }
}

Test:

package com.topcoder.div2.stage1;

import org.testng.annotations.Test;

import static org.testng.Assert.assertEquals;

public class GameOfStonesTest {
    private GameOfStones gameOfStones = new GameOfStones();

    @Test
    public void test1() {
        int expected = 0;
        int[] given = {17};

        int actual = gameOfStones.count(given);

        assertEquals(expected, actual);
    }

    @Test
    public void test2() {
        int expected = 3;
        int[] given ={7, 15, 9, 5};

        int actual = gameOfStones.count(given);
        assertEquals(actual, expected);
    }

    @Test
    public void test3() {
        int expected = -1;
        int[] given ={2, 8, 4};

        int actual = gameOfStones.count(given);
        assertEquals(actual, expected);
    }

    @Test
    public void test4() {
        int expected = -1;
        int[] given ={10, 15, 20, 12, 1, 20};

        int actual = gameOfStones.count(given);
        assertEquals(actual, expected);
    }

    @Test
    public void test5(){
        int expected = 277;
        int[] given ={17, 1, 27, 29, 13, 1, 27, 3, 19, 3, 25, 1, 11, 9, 7, 17, 31, 25, 5, 11, 31, 9,
                15, 3, 3, 3, 11, 11, 1, 41, 5, 95, 7, 3, 41, 31, 7, 13, 15, 5, 17, 3, 9, 3, 11,
                27, 1, 23, 15, 5, 43, 11, 17, 7, 1, 3, 13, 69, 3, 43, 21, 1, 25, 1, 3, 11, 5, 43,
                13, 7, 15, 1, 1, 55, 37, 9, 5, 7, 21, 3, 23, 15, 1, 9, 3, 35, 13, 17, 7, 17, 27, 5,
                9, 19, 13, 1, 1, 1, 29};
        int actual = gameOfStones.count(given);
        assertEquals(actual, expected);
    }

    @Test
     public void test6(){
        int expected = 539;
        int[] given ={1, 29, 11, 35, 57, 15, 85, 19, 5, 47, 53, 5, 63, 19, 13, 63, 27, 43, 53, 75, 67, 93, 33, 31, 47, 3,
                63, 17, 11, 53, 35, 23, 17, 45, 31, 19, 63, 75, 5, 3, 49, 19, 11, 89, 21, 69,
                71, 5, 45, 81, 31, 13, 11, 19, 7, 99, 33, 63, 19, 57, 73, 29, 35, 9, 47,
                1, 17, 7, 13, 31, 5, 85, 95, 23, 45, 65, 63, 41, 81, 33, 45, 1, 15,
                45, 19, 87, 51, 7, 13, 39, 1, 59, 29, 35, 1, 43};
        int actual = gameOfStones.count(given);
        assertEquals(actual, expected);
    }

    @Test
    public void test7() {
        int expected = 0;
        int[] given ={100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100,
                100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100,
                100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100,
                100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100,
                100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100, 100,
                100, 100};
        int actual = gameOfStones.count(given);
        assertEquals(actual, expected);
    }

    @Test
    public void test8() {
        int expected = 11;
        int[] given ={3, 5, 21, 31};
        int actual = gameOfStones.count(given);
        assertEquals(actual, expected);
    }

    @Test
    public void test9() {
        int expected = 13;
        int[] given ={44, 6, 46};
        int actual = gameOfStones.count(given);
        assertEquals(actual, expected);
    }

}

P.S if you know any suggestions of improving the solution you are more than welcome to include them in your answer.

1
  • You're using one instance of GameOfStones for all the tests, therefore you're reusing the value of iterations from the last test for the current one. Either you're resetting iterations in the count method, or you do what @BarrySW19 suggests.
    – Tom
    Oct 25, 2014 at 10:52

5 Answers 5

20

You are sharing a single instance of the class under test across all tests. I'd remove the initial assignment and add this:

private GameOfStones gameOfStones; // Don't create an instance here

@BeforeMethod
public void setUp() {
    gameOfStones = new GameOfStones();
}

... which will use a new instance for each test. Good practice would also be to clean up after each test:

@AfterMethod
public void tearDown() {
    gameOfStones = null;
}

In the example given here, fixing the class scoped variable causing the problem to be method scoped instead would also fix the issue, but as the software under test gets more complex it's good to start doing proper test set up and tear down.

5
  • Of course, as @Tom points out you could also ensure 'iterations' is a method local variable rather than a class level one which would allow the GameOfThrones object to be shared - but doing proper test set up and tear down is good too :)
    – BarrySW19
    Oct 25, 2014 at 10:59
  • You may change your annotations to @BeforeMethod and @AfterMethod. There are the corresponding TestNG annotations. (There are also @BeforeClass and @BeforeTest, but they act different)
    – Tom
    Oct 25, 2014 at 11:08
  • For those of you using JUnit, try @Before and @After. Apr 5, 2021 at 14:41
  • this was my answer too though a bit different. I was using ActivityScenarioRule, so now in the @Before method, i assign my acitivityRule
    – mitch94
    Oct 26, 2021 at 17:25
  • It eats me 4 days literally!!!
    – Ajay Takur
    Apr 21 at 6:15
2

I had same issue. I needed to mock a logger, which was a static field. So eventually class loader creates only a single instance of the static field during the first invocation of a class under the test and disregards all further mocking and stubbing. When run separately, test was green, because the logger was initialized and loaded as expected, but when run all together, with other test methods, it got initialized as a concrete object, not a mock. Workaround:

  • create @BeforeClass method to ensure that the right instance of static field will be created in the first place:
    @BeforeClass
    public static void setupBeforeClass() {
      PowerMockito.mockStatic(LoggerFactory.class);
      loggerMock = mock(Logger.class);
      when(LoggerFactory.getLogger(any(Class.class))).thenReturn(loggerMock);
   }
  • Interactions on the mock are getting accumulated from different test executions. Therefore, to be sure that you get a clean instance of the mock on each test method execution, reset the mock whether in @Before or @After method:
      @Before
      public void setup() {

        // Reset interactions on the mocked logger
        Mockito.reset(loggerMock);

      }

Note, that in my example I used PowerMock so you need a corresponding runner @RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class) and @PrepareForTest({LoggerFactory.class, MyClass.class)} statements.

1

You can also try @BeforeEach for Junit5

@BeforeEach
public void setup() {
  // Some code here
}
0

Since I am opening the same activity under test in many test cases executed one after another and same IntentsTestRule class activity

I could resolve the issue in my case by calling finishActivity on activityTestRule class and intentTestRule class

eg:

@After
fun method() {

mainActivityTestRule.finishActivity()

mIntentsRule.finishActivity()

}
0
0

I would like to add my experience regarding this issue.

After doing many debuggins I could confirm that there is no garbage data in the DB and also no static variables effects to the functionality.

And also the same unit tests, pass individually and all at once as expected in another environment.

Java versions, MySQL versions are the same in both environments. The only difference was the maven version. So, I configured the same maven version which was used in the successful environment.

Then after issue solved.

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