134

In C# 6, you can use the nameof() operator to get a string containing the name of a variable or a type.

Is this evaluated at compile-time, or at runtime via some Roslyn API?

4
  • Roslyn is the new compiler platform. It's only used at compile-time. Commented Oct 27, 2014 at 10:16
  • 2
    @PauloMorgado that's not true, you can use Rosyln at run time to do things. Such as building a live code editor or using Rosyln's parsing stuff to do things with trees or expressions or something Commented Oct 27, 2014 at 20:52
  • @ChrisMarisic that is my impression, but I did not respond since my knowledge on the topic is limited (hence my question). I did come across this: scriptcs.net which is a pretty good example of Roslyn's power, and which I believe does runtime stuff, but I could be wrong as I'm not quite well-informed about it.
    – Gigi
    Commented Oct 27, 2014 at 20:54
  • @ChrisMarisic, so, what you are sayng is that you can use Roslyn to build live code from source, not from the one binary that is running. And you're still using Roslyn to transform source into binaries that wont use Roslyn to change thos binries. If you couldn't aboslutely use Roslyn at runtime, then you could never compile any code. Commented Oct 28, 2014 at 1:35

2 Answers 2

144

Yes. nameof() is evaluated at compile-time. Looking at the latest version of the specs:

The nameof expression is a constant. In all cases, nameof(...) is evaluated at compile-time to produce a string. Its argument is not evaluated at runtime, and is considered unreachable code (however it does not emit an "unreachable code" warning).

From nameof operator - v5

You can see that with this TryRoslyn example where this:

public class Foo
{
    public void Bar()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(nameof(Foo));
    }
}

Is compiled and decompiled into this:

public class Foo
{
    public void Bar()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Foo");
    }
}

Its run-time equivalent is:

public class Foo
{
    public void Bar()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(typeof(Foo).Name);
    }
}

As was mentioned in the comments, that means that when you use nameof on type parameters in a generic type, don't expect to get the name of the actual dynamic type used as a type parameter instead of just the type parameter's name. So this:

public class Foo
{
    public void Bar<T>()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(nameof(T));
    }
}

Will become this:

public class Foo
{
    public void Bar<T>()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("T");
    }
}
5
  • What is "compile-time" here? Compilation to MSIL or compilation to native code?
    – user541686
    Commented Oct 29, 2014 at 5:36
  • 7
    @Mehrdad The C# compiler generates IL.
    – i3arnon
    Commented Oct 29, 2014 at 7:20
  • 3
    Quick question, can I use nameof in a switch case?
    – Spell
    Commented Jul 16, 2015 at 12:51
  • 2
    @Spell Yes
    – i3arnon
    Commented Jul 16, 2015 at 12:56
  • That works for type. How can you get the name of a member of the type at run time? This is useful for DataSource when indicating things like control.ValueMember = <member name>, especially after using DotFuscator. Commented Apr 23, 2022 at 14:18
62

I wanted to enrich the answer provided by @I3arnon with a proof that it is evaluated at compile-time.

Let's assume i want to print the name of a variable in the Console using the nameof operator:

 var firstname = "Gigi";
 var varname = nameof(firstname);
 Console.WriteLine(varname); // Prints "firstname" to the console

When you check out the MSIL generated you will see that it is equivalent to a string declaration because an object reference to a string gets pushed to the stack using the ldstr operator:

IL_0001: ldstr "Gigi"
IL_0006: stloc.0
IL_0007: ldstr "firstname"
IL_000c: stloc.1
IL_000d: ldloc.1
IL_000e: call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)

You will notice that declaring the firstname string and using the nameof operator generates the same code in MSIL, which means nameof is as efficient as declaring a string variable.

8
  • 5
    If the MSIL is decompiled to source code, how easy will it be for the decompiler to recognize it was a nameof operator, not a plain hardcoded string?
    – ADTC
    Commented Oct 28, 2014 at 1:41
  • 11
    That's a good question! you can post it as a new question on SO if you want to get a detailed explanation :).. however the short answer is that the decompiler will not be able to figure out it was a nameof operator, but will use a string literal instead. I have verified that is the case with ILSpy and Reflector. Commented Oct 28, 2014 at 8:34
  • 3
    @ADTC: As the nameof is fully replaced with load-a-string-onto-the-stack, how could the decompiler even attempt to guess that was a nameof, and not a simple constant parameter? Commented Oct 29, 2014 at 15:07
  • 3
    @Gigi if you had a decompiler that aggressively assumed string literals came from nameof you could use it to help automate a transition to that paradigm. Or such is the dream.
    – Caleth
    Commented Jul 23, 2015 at 2:20
  • 3
    Going back won't exactly work because nameof() also works on anything you have a reference on (e.g. nameof(someObject.SomeProperty) will be translated to just "SomeProperty". How should decompilation find out reliably what object that string came from when all it's got is a string literal?
    – Adwaenyth
    Commented May 12, 2017 at 6:55

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