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In a Java servlet environment, what are the factors that are the bottleneck for number of simultaneous users.

  1. Number of HTTP connections the server can allow per port
  2. Number of HTTP connections the server can allow across several ports (I can have multiple WAS profiles on several HTTP ports)
  3. Number of servlets in pool
  4. Number of threads configured for WAS to use to service connections
  5. RAM available to server (is there any any correletation between number of service threads assuming 0-memory leak in application)

Are there any other factors?

Edited: To leave business logic out of the picture, assume have only one servlet printing one line on Log4j.

  • Can my Tomcat server handle 6000 simultaneous HTTP connections? Why not (file handles? CPU time per request?)?
  • Can I have thread pool size as 5000 (do idle threads cost CPU/RAM)?
  • Can I have oracle connection pool size as 500 connections (do idle connections cost CPU/RAM)?

Is the amount of garbage that is generated for each connection have an impact? For example, if for each HTTP connection 20KB of objects are created and left behind by Tomcat.. then by the time 2500 requests are processed 100MB heap would be used and this may trigger a GC pause of 300ms.

Can we say something like this: if Tomcat uses 0.2 sec of CPU time for processing a single HTTP request, then it would be able to handle roughly 500 http connections in a second. So, 6000 connections would need 5 seconds.

6 Answers 6

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+50

Interesting question, If we leave apart all the performance deciding attributes finally it boils down to how much work you are doing in the servlet or how much time it takes if it has highest I/O, CPU and memory. Now lets move down with you list with the above statement in mind;-

Number of HTTP connections the server can allow per port

There are limit for file descriptors but that again gets triggered by how much time a servlet is taking complete a request or how much time it takes from request first byte receive to finish sending the entire response. Because if it take only 1ms and you are using Netty and persistent connection, you can reach a really high >> 6000.

Number of servlets in pool

Theoretically >> 6000. But how many thread are processing your requests? Is there a thread pool that is burning your requests ? So you want to increase threads, but how much lets say 2000 concurrent threads. Is your CPU behaving poor with context switching ? Is it I/O bound? if yes it makes sense to context switch but then you will be hitting those network limits because a lot of thread waiting on network I/O, so ultimately how much time you spent on a piece of work.

DB

If it oracle, bless you with connection management, you definitely need rigorous monitoring here. Now this is just another limiting factor and can be considered as an just another blocking I/O. By definition of I/O, latency/throughput matters and becomes a bottleneck the moment it becomes the bigger than the smallest piece of work.

So, finally, you need to break down following or more attributes for all the servlets

  1. Is it CPU bound? If yes, how much cycles it takes or can it be converted safely to some time unit. e.g. 1ms for just the compute piece of work.
  2. Is it I/O bound, If yes similarly find the unit.
  3. and others
  4. A long list of what you have, e.g. CPU, Memory, GB/s

Now you know how much work needs to be done and all you do is divide by what you have and keep tuning , so that you find out the optimal and also find out what else attribute you have not considered and consider them.

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    You got what I am looking for.. and thanks for the relevant link. I am hoping to get a reasonable understanding of the limiting factor in each case. Whether it is CPU cycle or memory or network bytes etc. This has got me started.
    – Teddy
    Dec 3, 2014 at 9:47
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The biggest bottleneck I have experienced is the time it takes to process the request. The faster you can service a request, the more connections you can handle.

It's a difficult question to answer due to every application being different. To figure this out for an application I support, I created a unit test that spawns many threads and I watch the memory usage in VisualVM in eclipse.

You can see how your memory consumption changes with the number of threads in use. And you should be able to get a thread dump and see how much memory the thread is using. You can extrapolate an average out to understand how much RAM you might need for N number of users.

The bottleneck will be a moving target since you'll optimize one area until you can scale larger, then another area will become your bottleneck.

If the response time of the servlet is a bottleneck, you'll could use some queuing mathematics to determine how many requests can be queued optimally based on the avg response time.

http://www4.ncsu.edu/~hp/SSME_QueueingTheory.pdf

Hope this helps.

Updated to address your additional questions:

Can my Tomcat server handle 6000 simultaneous HTTP connections? Why not (file handles? CPU time per request?)?

It's possible but probably not. Also you should probably add a web layer in front of the application server if you plan on doing high volume.
Suppose you have 6000 users all pounding away on your application. Each request a user sends only exists on the server for a moment [hopefully], and your peak thread count may have never reached over 20.
I'd recommend setting up some monitoring to understand how your application performs under real use cases. Check out http://Hawt.io which uses Jolokia to grab JMX metrics via http.
If your serious about analytics I'd recommend using something like Graphite to aggregate your JMX metrics. https://github.com/graphite-project/graphite-web
I've written a collector for Jolokia to send metrics to Carbon/Graphite, and may be able to open-source it with approval from my management. Let me know if you are interested.

Can I have thread pool size as 5000 (do idle threads cost CPU/RAM)?

Idle threads are not much to worry about, though setting your thread pool too high could allow your application server to receive too many requests. If this happens you may end up flooding your DB with connections it cant handle, or your memory allocation may not be enough to handle so many requests. This could start overall application performance degradation.
Set too low, and your app server could start queuing request again causing performance degradation.
It's normally to have some queuing during spikes or high volume times, but you don't want to overload your application server. Check out queuing theory to understand more about this.
Also, this is where having a web server in front of the app server could help you. If you have Apache serve your static content, only dynamic requests will reach the application servers in most cases.
Tuning is very specific to your individual application. I'd recommend staying with the defaults and just optimize your code until you can gather enough data to know which knob should be turned.

Can I have oracle connection pool size as 500 connections (do idle connections cost CPU/RAM)?

Same situation as the application thread pool size. Though your pool size for DB should be much smaller than the app thread count.
500 would be too high for most web applications unless you have very high volume, in which case you may need a DB cluster environment like Oracle RAC.
If the pool is set too high and you start using a lot of connections, your DB hardware will not be able to keep up and you will end up with performance problem on the database server.
The time it takes for a query to return may increase, in turn causing your application response time to increase. The "log jam" effect.
Use profiling or metrics to determine the avg number of active DB connections under normal use, and use that as a baseline for determining the max allowed.

Is the amount of garbage that is generated for each connection have an impact? For example, if for each HTTP connection 20KB of objects are created and left behind by Tomcat.. then by the time 2500 requests are processed 100MB heap would be used and this may trigger a GC pause of 300ms.

The numbers would be different, but yes. Also remember the Full GC are more concern. The incremental GCs will not pause your application. Check out "concurrent mark and sweep" and "Garbage first".

Can we say something like this: if Tomcat uses 0.2 sec of CPU time for processing a single HTTP request, then it would be able to handle roughly 500 http connections in a second. So, 6000 connections would need 5 seconds.

It's not quite that easy as each request is coming in, there are also some being processed and completed. Check out queuing theory to understand this better. http://www4.ncsu.edu/~hp/SSME_QueueingTheory.pdf

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  • Thank you... great points. Any limits on simultaneous http connections that can be received?
    – Teddy
    Nov 28, 2014 at 9:59
  • The limit will be tied to the number of threads available to your application server. Also check out your 'ulimit' as each http connection contributes to this total.
    – Jeremy
    Nov 29, 2014 at 19:50
  • To know how many simultaneous connections your app can handle, you need to understand first the avg size of your threads by profiling. Then you can use math to determine how many requests your box can support. But remember simultaneous requests do not equal simultaneous users.
    – Jeremy
    Nov 29, 2014 at 19:58
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There is another common bottleneck : the size of the database connection pool. But I have an additional remark : when you exhaust the number of allowed HTTP connections, of the number of threads allowed to serve request, you will only reject some requests. But when you exhaust memory (too much sessions with too much data for example), you can crash the whole application.

The difference is that in the case of heavy load for a short time, when load later falls down :

  • in first case, the application is up and can serve requests normally
  • in second case the application is down and must be restarted

EDIT :

I forgot to remember real use cases. The biggest problem I ever found for serving numerous concurrent connections is the quality of the database requests (assuming you use a database). There is not a direct impact since there is no maximum number, but you can easily hog all database server resources. Common examples of poor database requests :

  • no index on a table with a large number of rows
  • a request (on a big table) that makes no use of any index
  • the n+1 syndrome : with a ORM when you map a one to many relation to a collection no eagerly when you always need data from the collection
  • the load full database syndrome : with a ORM when you map all relations as eager, any single request ends in loading a high quantity of dependent data.

What is worse with those problems, is that they can cause no harm in tests when the database is young because there are not that many rows, but with time and increasing number of rows performances fall giving a unusable application over few users.

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  • Modern framework gets around database connection pool size, by reusing already taken connections, so that shouldn't be too much of an issue I suppose. Nov 27, 2014 at 10:08
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    @TomasSmagurauskas I cannot understand your point : reusing connections is what a pool is make for. Nov 27, 2014 at 17:13
  • @Teddy : post updated with another common concurrency problem. Nov 27, 2014 at 17:14
  • @SergeBallesta I agree with you regarding the broad approach to performance. My question is a little more theoretical. Is there a rule of thumb like "each thread holds up minimum 300KB memory.. so just having a pool of 800 idle threads would eat up 240MB". I am just trying to understand how each piece of my application eats resources.
    – Teddy
    Nov 28, 2014 at 9:55
  • @Teddy - The size of the thread will depend on what that thread is doing. How many variables you have created, what type they are, accessing static resources, etc... In addition to memory usage, you want to monitor the actual time it takes to process the requests and optimize this.
    – Jeremy
    Nov 29, 2014 at 19:32
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Number of HTTP connections the server can allow per port

Unlimited except by kernel resources, e.g. FDs, socket buffer soace, etc.

Number of HTTP connections the server can allow across several ports (I can have multiple WAS profiles on several HTTP ports)

As the number of connections per port is unlimited, this irrelevant.

Number of servlets in pool

Irrelevant except insofar as it increases the rate of incoming requests.

Number of threads configured for WAS to use to service connections

Relevant in an indirect way, see below.

RAM available to server (is there any any correletation between number of service threads assuming 0-memory leak in application)

Relevant if it limits the number of threads below the configured number of threads mentioned above.

The fundamental limitation is request service time. The shorter, the better. The longer it is, the longer the thread is tied up in that request, the longer wait queues get, ... Queuing theory dictates that the 'sweet spot' is no more than 70% server utilization. Beyond that, wait times grow rapidly with increasing utilization.

So anything that contributes to request service time is significant: for example, thread pool size, connection pool size, concurrency bottlenecks, ...

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  • Thanks. I'm still a little confused. If I had a servlet which just printed one line to Log4j could it handle 6000 simultaneous requests on Tomcat with 500 MB heap size? Will some connections be dropped? Why will they be dropped? Could I configure thread pool size as 1000 or Oracle connection pool size as 500 connections? What is the cost of one thread (just the thread itself, not the business logic)? What is the cost of keeping a single oracle connection open (2MB of RAM per connection?)?
    – Teddy
    Nov 28, 2014 at 10:10
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You should also consider that the use case itself is limiting the amount of concurrency. Imagine a collaborative environment where the order of actions matters. This forces you to synchronize actions - even if you would have been able to process all of them at once.

In java land this could be a simple thing as sharing a single resource which is using blocking access. (e.g. shared Random number generators (not per thread), shared Vectors, concurrent structures like ConcurrentHashMap etc.).

The more synchronization the less you will be able to fully utilize your server hardware.

So apart from running out of memory or saturating the CPU or hitting the garbage collection limit this synchronization might be a problem which does not only need to be solved in your code but maybe even requires you to soften some requirements of the high level workflow.

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  • Thanks. Agree with you that business logic and algorithm matter the most. Just wondering if I had a servlet which just printed one line to Log4j could it handle 6000 simultaneous requests on Tomcat with 500 MB heap size? Will some connections be dropped? Why will they be dropped?
    – Teddy
    Nov 28, 2014 at 10:04
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Seeing point 6, you can use these tools to see if your hardware is being the bottleneck: Assuming that you're on linux, you can use VmStat to see some statistics on your RAM usage, top or atop (depending on your distro) to see processes taking a toll in your CPU and RAM, nload and iftop to see what is consuming network bandwith, and iotop to see what is reading and writing to your disk.

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