10

I want to write an int-returning function that accepts a closure taking zero arguments, a closure taking one argument, and a closure taking two arguments, where all closure arguments are of type int and every closure returns f32.

What is that function's signature going to look like?

Now I want to accept via the Fn and FnMut traits. What does the signature look like? Is the use of features in the crate required? If so, which ones and why?

If known: what does it look like sugared? Desugared?

If known: what is likely to be changed in the future?

10

I want to write an int-returning function that accepts a closure taking zero arguments, a closure taking one argument, and a closure taking two arguments, where all closure arguments are of type int and every closure returns f32.

What is that function's signature going to look like?

Function signature and its usage currently (2014-10-26 nightly) could look like this:

#![feature(unboxed_closures, unboxed_closure_sugar, overloaded_calls)]

fn closures<F1, F2, F3>(mut f1: F1, mut f2: F2, mut f3: F3) -> int
    where F1: FnMut() -> f32,
          F2: FnMut(int) -> f32,
          F3: FnMut(int, int) -> f32 {
    (f1() + f2(10) + f3(20, 30)) as int
}

fn main() {
    let x = closures(
        |&mut:| 0.1,
        |&mut: x: int| (2*x) as f32,
        |&mut: x: int, y: int| (x + y) as f32
    );
    println!("{}", x);
}

You can use Fn instead of FnMut (and remove mut before f1, f2 and f3) if you want to force the caller to pass closures which don't mutate their environment, but in general, I think, you would want to use FnMut.

This code uses unboxed closure sugar and overloaded calls. Without them it would look like this:

#![feature(unboxed_closures)]

fn closures<F1, F2, F3>(mut f1: F1, mut f2: F2, mut f3: F3) -> int
    where F1: FnMut<(), f32>,
          F2: FnMut<(int,), f32>,
          F3: FnMut<(int, int), f32> {
    (f1.call_mut(()) + f2.call_mut((10,)) + f3.call_mut((20, 30))) as int
}

fn main() {
    let x = closures(
        |&mut:| 0.1,
        |&mut: x: int| (2*x) as f32,
        |&mut: x: int, y: int| (x + y) as f32
    );
    println!("{}", x);
}

The sugar is used to prettify closure type syntax, and overloaded calls feature allows to omit explicit call_* methods.

As for what's going to change in future, then it is likely that closure construction syntax would be simplified (when current closures are dropped), so the main() bit will look like this:

fn main() {
    let x = closures(
        || 0.1,
        |x| (2*x) as f32,
        |x, y| (x + y) as f32
    );
    println!("{}", x);
}

The actual type of the closure (FnMut, Fn or FnOnce) is going to be inferred.

There will also be other changes, like move keyword for closures which are returned from functions (move affects variable capturing semantics). This is covered by this accepted RFC.

In general, unboxed closures are outlined in this RFC. It is not updated, however, with new closures sugar syntax and with other subtle changes; it may be better to follow Rust issue tracker to find out more on this. For example, a lot of issues with unboxed closures are aggregated in this bug.

  • Huh. I was looking through the RFCs trying to find info on the Fn traits and I guess I missed it because I was looking for 'traits' and not 'closures'. Thanks! – user Oct 26 '14 at 21:35
  • Yeah, these things are called unboxed closures, you will find a lot on them if you look for this term. – Vladimir Matveev Oct 26 '14 at 21:43
4

Fn, FnMut and FnOnce are the three trait types that were introduced with unboxed closures. The difference between these traits, besides the name of their single method, is that the self parameter on these methods is passed differently:

  • Fn: &self (by reference, can't mutate the closure's environment)
  • FnMut: &mut self (by reference, can mutate the closure's environment)
  • FnOnce: self (by value, consumes the closure, so the closure can only be called once)

These traits have two type parameters: Args, which is a tuple type that represents the closure's parameters (or () if the closure takes no parameters) and Result, which is the closure's return type.

Now to answer your question:

  • Closure taking zero arguments:

    fn foo<F: Fn<(), f32>>(closure: F) -> int {
        0
    }
    
    • Alternatively, the bound can be written using a where clause:

      fn foo<F>(closure: F) -> int where F: Fn<(), f32> {
          0
      }
      
  • Closure taking one argument:

    fn foo<F: Fn<(int), f32>>(closure: F) -> int {
        0
    }
    
  • Closure taking two arguments:

    fn foo<F: Fn<(int, int), f32>>(closure: F) -> int {
        0
    }
    
  • Closure taking zero arguments, sugared form:

    fn foo<F: Fn() -> f32>(closure: F) -> int {
        0
    }
    
  • Closure taking one argument, sugared form:

    fn foo<F: Fn(int) -> f32>(closure: F) -> int {
        0
    }
    
  • Closure taking two arguments, sugared form:

    fn foo<F: Fn(int, int) -> f32>(closure: F) -> int {
        0
    }
    

The old "boxed" closures are going away. You can track bugs on unboxed closures on the metabug.

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