9

I want the code to run until the user enters an integer value.

The code works for char and char arrays.

I have done the following:


#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int n;
    printf("Please enter an integer: ");
    while(scanf("%d",&n) != 1)
    {
        printf("Please enter an integer: ");
        while(getchar() != '\n');
    }
    printf("You entered: %d\n",n);
    return 0;
}

The problem is if the user inputs a float value scanf will accept it.

Please enter an integer: abcd
Please enter an integer: a
Please enter an integer: 5.9
You entered: 5

How can that be avoided?

26
  1. You take scanf().
  2. You throw it in the bin.
  3. You use fgets() to get an entire line.
  4. You use strtol() to parse the line as an integer, checking if it consumed the entire line.
char *end;
char buf[LINE_MAX];

do {
     if (!fgets(buf, sizeof buf, stdin))
        break;

     // remove \n
     buf[strlen(buf) - 1] = 0;

     int n = strtol(buf, &end, 10);
} while (end != buf + strlen(buf));
  • 1
    Hmmm Looks like the loop will exit if user only enters '\n'. Do not know if that is important to OP. – chux Oct 27 '14 at 14:23
  • 1
    @chux it's intentional rudimentary error handling. – The Paramagnetic Croissant Oct 27 '14 at 15:11
5

Use fgets and strtol,

A pointer to the first character following the integer representation in s is stored in the object pointed by p, if *p is different to \n then you have a bad input.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void) 
{
    char *p, s[100];
    int n;

    while (fgets(s, sizeof(s), stdin)) {
        n = strtol(s, &p, 10);
        if (p == s || *p != '\n') {
            printf("Please enter an integer: ");
        } else break;
    }
    printf("You entered: %d\n", n);
    return 0;
}
3

I know how this can be done using fgets and strtol, I would like to know how this can be done using scanf() (if possible).

As the other answers say, scanf isn't really suitable for this, fgets and strtol is an alternative (though fgets has the drawback that it's hard to detect a 0-byte in the input and impossible to tell what has been input after a 0-byte, if any).

For sake of completeness (and assuming valid input is an integer followed by a newline):

while(scanf("%d%1[\n]", &n, (char [2]){ 0 }) < 2)

Alternatively, use %n before and after %*1[\n] with assignment-suppression. Note, however (from the Debian manpage):

This is not a conversion, although it can be suppressed with the * assignment-suppression character. The C standard says: "Execution of a %n directive does not increment the assignment count returned at the completion of execution" but the Corrigendum seems to contradict this. Probably it is wise not to make any assumptions on the effect of %n conversions on the return value.

3

Try using the following pattern in scanf. It will read until the end of the line:

scanf("%d\n", &n)

You won't need the getchar() inside the loop since scanf will read the whole line. The floats won't match the scanf pattern and the prompt will ask for an integer again.

  • 1
    scanf("%d\n",&n) only reads the whole line (and then some) if a int was entered. If no int was entered, input remains in stdin. Using "\n" not only consumes '\n', but it scans for any number of white-space until a non-whitespace is entered. That char is then put back into stdin. So scanf() will not immediately return when '\n' is entered. – chux Oct 27 '14 at 14:33
  • See scanf() and trailing white space in format string — don't do it if you value your user's sanity. – Jonathan Leffler Jun 16 at 9:33
2

If you're set on using scanf, you can do something like the following:

int val;
char follow;  
int read = scanf( "%d%c", &val, &follow );

if ( read == 2 )
{
  if ( isspace( follow ) )
  {
    // input is an integer followed by whitespace, accept
  }
  else
  {
    // input is an integer followed by non-whitespace, reject
  }
}
else if ( read == 1 )
{
  // input is an integer followed by EOF, accept
}
else
{
  // input is not an integer, reject
}
2

A possible solution is to think about it backwards: Accept a float as input and reject the input if the float is not an integer:

int n;
float f;
printf("Please enter an integer: ");
while(scanf("%f",&f)!=1 || (int)f != f)
{
    ...
}
n = f;

Though this does allow the user to enter something like 12.0, or 12e0, etc.

  • 1
    Note: When input is "abcd", code is still left in stdin. Also, try this with input "2147483647" or "0.9999999999". – chux Oct 27 '14 at 15:17
2

Using fgets() is better.

To solve only using scanf() for input, scan for an int and the following char.

int ReadUntilEOL(void) {
  char ch;
  int count;
  while ((count = scanf("%c", &ch)) == 1 && ch != '\n')
    ; // Consume char until \n or EOF or IO error
  return count;
}

#include<stdio.h>
int main(void) {
  int n;

  for (;;) {
    printf("Please enter an integer: ");
    char NextChar = '\n';
    int count = scanf("%d%c", &n, &NextChar);
    if (count >= 1 && NextChar == '\n') 
      break;
    if (ReadUntilEOL() == EOF) 
      return 1;  // No valid input ever found
  }
  printf("You entered: %d\n", n);
  return 0;
}

This approach does not re-prompt if user only enters white-space such as only Enter.

  • in each pass through the loop, set NextChar = '\0'; However, , '\n', in certain OSs, is a multi char item, so define as 'int NextChar = 0 Then it will re-prompt when no char entered – user3629249 Oct 28 '14 at 3:25
  • @user3629249 Thanks for the idea - d o not think it will work. When no char is entered (example: only '\n'), scanf() will not return until some non-white-space is entered. The "%d" causes scanf() to consume white-space until EOF or non-white-space. So setting NextChar to this or that will not make a difference. – chux Oct 28 '14 at 3:36
  • @chux How would you modify this if it was to accept only positive integers? The modification of the first if if (count >= 1 && n > 0 && NextChar == '\n') doesnt seem to work. Stdout doesnt react if we give for example -125 but we have to enter input again to show a message. – BugShotGG Mar 2 '15 at 10:43
  • @Geo Papas if (count >= 1 && NextChar == '\n') is used to detect if a number was entered without additional char. It is within the body of this if() that the additional testing should be added to further qualify n: if (count >= 1 && NextChar == '\n') if (!(n > 0)) continue; break; – chux Mar 2 '15 at 15:34

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