45

I am using progress dialog.i need to stop the thread when user close the progressdialog .unfortunately it giving exception pls help me..

In inner class

class UpdateThread extends Thread{

    public  void run() {
        while (true){
            count=adapter.getCount();

            try {
               mHandler.post(  new Runnable() {
                    public  void run() {
                        Log.i(TAG,count+"count");
                        progressDialog.setMessage(count + "Device  found");
                    }
                });
                Thread.sleep(300);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

Oncreate

 updateThread=new UpdateThread();

 progressDialog= new ProgressDialog(GroupListActivity.this);
 synchronized (this) {
     updateThread.start();
 }

ondismissal

   progressDialog.setOnDismissListener(new DialogInterface.OnDismissListener() {
        @Override
        public  void onDismiss(DialogInterface dialog) {
            try {
                synchronized (this) {
                    updateThread.wait(300);
                }

            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            Log.i(TAG,"Thread is stopped");
        }
    });
  • What exactly are you trying to achieve with the locks? – Krease Oct 27 '14 at 17:14
  • @Chris its giving exception.so i have to lock – Asthme Oct 27 '14 at 17:20
  • I understand that you have to use synchronized if you're calling wait, but I don't get (a) why you're also synchronizing on calling updateThread.start, or (b) why you're using wait to begin with (since you're not using notify or notifyAll). I suspect you're synchronizing and using wait where you shouldn't be. – Krease Oct 27 '14 at 17:25
  • Added an answer that changes your code to accomplish what it looks like you're trying to do. – Krease Oct 27 '14 at 17:35
62

This is wrong:

synchronized(foo) {
    foo.wait();
}

The problem is, what's going to wake this thread up? That is to say, how do you guarantee that the other thread won't call foo.notify() before the first thread calls foo.wait()? That's important because the foo object will not remember that it was notified if the notify call happens first. If there's only one notify(), and if it happens before the wait(), then the wait() will never return.

Here's how wait and notify were meant to be used:

private Queue<Product> q = ...;
private Object lock = new Object();

void produceSomething(...) {
    Product p = reallyProduceSomething();
    synchronized(lock) {
        q.add(p);
        lock.notify();
    }
}

void consumeSomething(...) {
    Product p = null;
    synchronized(lock) {
        while (q.peek() == null) {
            lock.wait();
        }
        p = q.remove();
    }
    reallyConsume(p);
}

The most important things to to note in this example are that there is an explicit test for the condition (i.e., q.peek() != null), and that nobody changes the condition without locking the lock.

If the consumer is called first, then it will find the queue empty, and it will wait. There is no moment when the producer can slip in, add a Product to the queue, and then notify the lock until the consumer is ready to receive that notification.

On the other hand, if the producer is called first, then the consumer is guaranteed not to call wait().

The loop in the consumer is important for two reasons: One is that, if there is more than one consumer thread, then it is possible for one consumer to receive a notification, but then another consumer sneaks in and steals the Product from the queue. The only reasonable thing for the fist consumer to do in that case is wait again for the next Product. The other reason that the loop is important is that the Javadoc says Object.wait() is allowed to return even when the object has not been notified. That is called a "spurious wakeup", and the correct way to handle it is to go back and wait again.

Also note: The lock is private and the queue is private. That guarantees that no other compilation unit is going to interfere with the synchronization in this compilation unit.

And note: The lock is a different object from the queue itself. That guarantees that synchronization in this compilation unit will not interfere with whatever synchronization that the Queue implementation does (if any).


NOTE: My example re-invents a wheel to prove a point. In real code, you would use the put() and take() methods of an ArrayBlockingQueue which would take care of all of the waiting and notifying for you.

| improve this answer | |
  • .Awesome explanation.i will try to integreate and let u know – Asthme Oct 27 '14 at 17:32
  • wait() would release object monitor before blocking its thread, so it would not block other threads calling notify. (from stackoverflow.com/questions/7126550/…) – Mygod Dec 3 '15 at 18:04
  • @Mygod, Yes. A call to o.wait() releases the calling thread's lock on o, then it waits for a notification, and then it re-acquires the lock before it returns. – Solomon Slow Dec 3 '15 at 18:08
  • @jameslarge I didn't know that so I thought this code wouldn't work. – Mygod Dec 3 '15 at 18:20
  • I would add "final" modifier to private Object lock – activity Mar 31 '18 at 12:02
9

You can only wait on an object if you already hold the lock on it, you could try:

synchronized (updateThread) {
    updateThread.wait(300);
}

... but I'm not really sure what you're trying to achieve with the locks.

| improve this answer | |
0

It really looks like you're trying to use synchronized and wait where you shouldn't be.

If you really want to wait for the thread to finish, you should be doing something like this

In your UpdateThread:

class UpdateThread extends Thread{
    public AtomicBoolean stopped = new AtomicBoolean(false);
    public  void run() {
        while (!stopped.get()){
    .....

In your creation:

updateThread = new UpdateThread();
progressDialog = new ProgressDialog(GroupListActivity.this);
updateThread.start();    // no synchronization necessary

In your on dismiss:

progressDialog.setOnDismissListener(new DialogInterface.OnDismissListener() {
        @Override
        public  void onDismiss(DialogInterface dialog) {
            try {
                updateThread.stopped.set(true);
                updateThread.join(300);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            Log.i(TAG,"Thread is stopped");
        }
    });

Note, I added an exit condition to your thread so it will actually stop (as is, your thread will keep going). You'd probably want to make the exit condition private and add a setter for cleanliness. Also, I'm using join to properly wait for your thread to complete.

| improve this answer | |

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