9

While reviewing for an exam I noticed I had written a logical error and I believe it is because of the compound assignment += because the Increment ++ executes as intended but it only occurs when assigning the value of foo to foo +1 or

foo += foo + 1;

Here is the code.

//Break Statement
    Boolean exit = false;
    int foo = 1, bar = 60;
    while (!exit) {         
        foo+=foo+1; //Bad Code
        //foo++; //Good Code
        //foo=foo+1; // Good Code
        //foo+=1; // Good Code
        //System.out.println(foo); //Results in -1 (Infinite Loop)
        if (foo == bar) {
            break;
        }
        System.out.println("stuff");
    }

My question is why does foo+=foo+1 result in -1?

Please Note: I am new to Stackoverflow and unable to vote up your answer so know that I am thankful for any help and thank you in advance!

  • 2
    You can accept an answer by clicking the checkmark next to the answer. – Sotirios Delimanolis Oct 27 '14 at 23:20
  • I dont see how this would result in -1. It should be 3 on the first iteration. It might be an infinite loop because it would skip right over the number 60. But that could be fixed by saying if(foo >= bar) – ug_ Oct 27 '14 at 23:23
  • 1
    I cannot reproduce this with your code in the question. Can you extract the problem down to something reproducible? Often you will find that this process will already answer your question. – Jeroen Vannevel Oct 27 '14 at 23:25
  • Aside: if foo += foo + 1; shows up on an exam, your instructor is a stupid jerk. – Chris Martin Oct 30 '14 at 1:06
  • @ChrisMartin No haha, this was discovered on a personal project thankfully. – Clark Elliott Oct 30 '14 at 1:11
13

If you're talking about it being -1 at the end of the loop; it's just because int is signed and it wraps around.

int foo = 1;
while (foo >= 0) {
    foo += foo + 1;
}
System.out.println(foo);

Will output -1. You can trace through it:

foo += 1 + 1 ---> 3
foo += 3 + 1 ---> 7
foo += 7 + 1 ---> 15
foo += 15 + 1 ---> 31
foo += 31 + 1 ---> 63
foo += 63 + 1 ---> 127
foo += 127 + 1 ---> 255
foo += 255 + 1 ---> 511
foo += 511 + 1 ---> 1023
foo += 1023 + 1 ---> 2047
foo += 2047 + 1 ---> 4095
foo += 4095 + 1 ---> 8191
foo += 8191 + 1 ---> 16383
foo += 16383 + 1 ---> 32767
foo += 32767 + 1 ---> 65535
foo += 65535 + 1 ---> 131071
foo += 131071 + 1 ---> 262143
foo += 262143 + 1 ---> 524287
foo += 524287 + 1 ---> 1048575
foo += 1048575 + 1 ---> 2097151
foo += 2097151 + 1 ---> 4194303
foo += 4194303 + 1 ---> 8388607
foo += 8388607 + 1 ---> 16777215
foo += 16777215 + 1 ---> 33554431
foo += 33554431 + 1 ---> 67108863
foo += 67108863 + 1 ---> 134217727
foo += 134217727 + 1 ---> 268435455
foo += 268435455 + 1 ---> 536870911
foo += 536870911 + 1 ---> 1073741823
foo += 1073741823 + 1 ---> 2147483647
foo += 2147483647 + 1 ---> -1

The math just works out that way. Each iteration results in a value that is 1 less than a power of 2. I guess if you worked out the algebra you could show this. So it makes sense that it would hit -1, which, in a 32-bit signed int, is 232-1.

Then as tom and Tomáš Zíma astutely point out, it gets stuck because -1 + -1 + 1 is still just -1.

Also note, as tom discovered in comments below, that you'll hit -1 no matter what number you start with. This is because foo += foo + 1 is the same as foo = 2 * foo + 1, which is really just foo = (foo << 1) | 1 (left shift [results in low bit 0] then turn on low bit - same as adding 1 when the number is even). So no matter what you start with, after at most 32 (or however many bits there are) iterations, you will eventually have shifted your starting value all the way off the left side and replaced it with all 1's (which, in a two's complement signed int, is the value -1). E.g. with a signed 8 bit number:

abcdefgh         starting foo, 8 unknown bits
bcdefgh0         add to itself (or multiply by two, or left shift)
bcdefgh1         add one
...
cdefgh11         again
defgh111         and again
efgh1111         and again
fgh11111         and again
gh111111         and again
h1111111         and again
11111111         and again, now it's -1
... and for completeness:
11111110         left shift -1
11111111         add 1, it's back to -1

Incidentally, no matter what number you start with, you'll never hit 60 (or any even number, for that matter). You can show this just with some quick algebra: If 60 = 2 * foo + 1, then the previous foo = 59 / 2 which is already not an integer; so you'll never ever have an integer foo such that 60 = 2 * foo + 1.

  • This taught me something. Thanks. – tom Oct 27 '14 at 23:28
  • 1
    if you start it at 2 (or any other number), you still hit -1. Weird.ideone.com/jQIzb6 – tom Oct 27 '14 at 23:41
  • @tom Whoa. That is kinda weird. I need to close my web browser so I don't get stuck trying to figure out what the heck is going on with the math on this one... 8-) – Jason C Oct 27 '14 at 23:43
  • :D If you figure it out, let me know! – tom Oct 27 '14 at 23:46
  • 1
    @tom Wait I got it (I didn't close the browser...). Since it's the same as foo = foo * 2 + 1, it's a left shift (low bit will always be 0 after this) then add 1 (low bit will be set to 1). If you repeat this process, after at most 32 (or however many bits are in the int) iterations, the original number will have been shifted completely off the left hand side and replaced with 1's, which is -1. – Jason C Oct 27 '14 at 23:50
7
foo += foo + 1

is parsed as

foo = (foo) + (foo + 1)

not foo = (foo + 1)

Meaning you get

1: 3 (+ 1 + 2)
2: 7 (+3 + 4)
3: 15 (+7 +8)
4: 31 (+15 +16)
5: 63 (+32 +33)

etc

So you'll never have foo == 60 and an infinite loop instead.

eta: seems I just learnt something myself. The int rolls over and hits -1. Thanks @Jason C

  • Since foo may never equal bar could it possibly be an overflow error? I have never experience a arithmetic sequence result in -1. – DanSchneiderNA Oct 27 '14 at 23:24
  • A stack overflow would result from running out of stack space, which generally happens when recursive function calls go too deep. There is nothing in the OP's code that consumes stack space. – Jason C Oct 27 '14 at 23:29
  • You're right. And once it hits -1, it stays there. – tom Oct 27 '14 at 23:30
  • @tom It would be impossible to hit 60. foo += foo + 1 is the same as foo = foo * 2 + 1. There's no way to start at 1 and get to 60 like this. You can prove it to yourself quickly by working backwards from 60. If 60=foo*2+1, then quick algebra says the previous foo=59/2, which is already an impossible value for an integer. – Jason C Oct 27 '14 at 23:35
  • Thank you all, I have learned a lot from this little loop lol – Clark Elliott Oct 28 '14 at 2:33
3

Consider the following code:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int foo = 1;
        while (true) {
            foo += foo + 1;
            System.out.println(foo);
        }
    }
}

After a few iterations, it prints -1 over and over again. Here is why: overflow! As soon as the value of foo is equal to 2147483647, the result will be -1. The expression being evaluated looks like:

2147483647 + 2147483647 + 1 // which is -1, given you work with int

Once you got -1, it will never change the value again. Why?

foo += foo + 1

is basically the same as

foo = foo + foo + 1

which is, with foo=-1, equivalent to:

foo = -1 + -1 + 1

The reason your loop never ends up is in the condition you used. Foo won't ever be equal to 60. And that's the point.

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