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While the below code works, I'm not sure it is the best practice. I'm wondering if I am over-thinking the situation.

Situation: The below code is in my main ViewModel constructor. The ViewModel has a property MessageHandler that has a ReactiveCommand property on it called ReceiveMessage. The ViewModel has another property ScannerViewModel with a RawMessage Property on it. I would like to use the ReactiveUI .InvokeCommand() extension method to pipe RawMessage to ReceiveMessage. I want this due to the convenience of it checking the .CanExecute for me. This should happen even though MessageHandler (or even ReceiveMessage potentially) could change, as well as ScannerViewModel.

 this.WhenAnyValue(t => t.MessageHandler.ReceiveMessage)
     .Select(cmd => 
             this.WhenAnyValue(t => t.ScannerViewModel.RawMessage)
                 .InvokeCommand(cmd))
     .Scan(Disposable.Empty,
             (acc, n) =>
                        {
                            acc.Dispose();
                            return n;
                        })
     .Subscribe();

So the above seems to work. I'm not too sure about whether or not I need to dispose the previous InvokeCommand disposables as I go along, so maybe the .Scan section is unneeded, or perhaps could be done better.

I tried the overload of the InvokeCommand extension that lets you assign a target but it seemed to be static, or I could not figure out the syntax to make it take an Observable as a target:

 this.WhenAnyValue(t => t.ScannerViewModel.RawMessage)
     .InvokeCommand(MessageHandler, m => m.ReceiveMessage);

That would follow the RawMessage as its parent changed, but breaks if MessageHandler changed. And this does not compile:

 this.WhenAnyValue(t => t.ScannerViewModel.RawMessage)
     .InvokeCommand(this.WhenAnyValue(t => t.MessageHandler), m => m.ReceiveMessage);

I'm not against keeping what I've got, unless someone finds a flaw with it. I am looking for something that is maybe a little less verbose and easier to follow.

1

Don't ask me why I didn't think to just do this:

 this.WhenAnyValue(t => t.ScannerViewModel.RawMessage)
     .InvokeCommand(this, t => t.MessageHandler.ReceiveMessage);

I was looking at it upside down. I think this will achieve what I want.

Time and again I keep finding this framework has already found solutions to problems I find -- it is just a matter of grokking it for myself.

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