192

I am using .NET JSON parser and would like to serialize my config file so it is readable. So instead of:

{"blah":"v", "blah2":"v2"}

I would like something nicer like:

{
    "blah":"v", 
    "blah2":"v2"
}

My code is something like this:

using System.Web.Script.Serialization; 

var ser = new JavaScriptSerializer();
configSz = ser.Serialize(config);
using (var f = (TextWriter)File.CreateText(configFn))
{
    f.WriteLine(configSz);
    f.Close();
}
207

You are going to have a hard time accomplishing this with JavaScriptSerializer.

Try JSON.Net.

With minor modifications from JSON.Net example

using System;
using Newtonsoft.Json;

namespace JsonPrettyPrint
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Product product = new Product
                {
                    Name = "Apple",
                    Expiry = new DateTime(2008, 12, 28),
                    Price = 3.99M,
                    Sizes = new[] { "Small", "Medium", "Large" }
                };

            string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(product, Formatting.Indented);
            Console.WriteLine(json);

            Product deserializedProduct = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Product>(json);
        }
    }

    internal class Product
    {
        public String[] Sizes { get; set; }
        public decimal Price { get; set; }
        public DateTime Expiry { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}

Results

{
  "Sizes": [
    "Small",
    "Medium",
    "Large"
  ],
  "Price": 3.99,
  "Expiry": "\/Date(1230447600000-0700)\/",
  "Name": "Apple"
}

Documentation: Serialize an Object

132

A shorter sample code for Json.Net library

private static string FormatJson(string json)
{
    dynamic parsedJson = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(json);
    return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(parsedJson, Formatting.Indented);
}
104

If you have a JSON string and want to "prettify" it, but don't want to serialise it to and from a known C# type then the following does the trick (using JSON.NET):

using System;
using System.IO;
using Newtonsoft.Json;

class JsonUtil
{
    public static string JsonPrettify(string json)
    {
        using (var stringReader = new StringReader(json))
        using (var stringWriter = new StringWriter())
        {
            var jsonReader = new JsonTextReader(stringReader);
            var jsonWriter = new JsonTextWriter(stringWriter) { Formatting = Formatting.Indented };
            jsonWriter.WriteToken(jsonReader);
            return stringWriter.ToString();
        }
    }
}
  • 4
    For only prettify a Json string this is a much proper solution than the others... – Jens Marchewka Dec 3 '15 at 11:53
  • 2
    The following use cases will fail: JsonPrettify("null") and JsonPrettify("\"string\"") – Ekevoo Jul 26 '16 at 19:00
  • 1
    Thanks @Ekevoo, I've rolled it back to my previous version! – Duncan Smart Jul 27 '16 at 11:58
  • @DuncanSmart I love this! That version creates way fewer temporary objects. I think it it's better than the one I criticized even if those use cases worked. – Ekevoo Jul 27 '16 at 16:54
63

Shortest version to prettify existing JSON: (edit: using JSON.net)

JToken.Parse("mystring").ToString()

Input:

{"menu": { "id": "file", "value": "File", "popup": { "menuitem": [ {"value": "New", "onclick": "CreateNewDoc()"}, {"value": "Open", "onclick": "OpenDoc()"}, {"value": "Close", "onclick": "CloseDoc()"} ] } }}

Output:

{
  "menu": {
    "id": "file",
    "value": "File",
    "popup": {
      "menuitem": [
        {
          "value": "New",
          "onclick": "CreateNewDoc()"
        },
        {
          "value": "Open",
          "onclick": "OpenDoc()"
        },
        {
          "value": "Close",
          "onclick": "CloseDoc()"
        }
      ]
    }
  }
}

To pretty-print an object:

JToken.FromObject(myObject).ToString()
  • 2
    This works even without knowing the structure of the json in advance. And it is the shortest answer here。 – foresightyj Dec 29 '16 at 10:32
  • 1
    This works, but only if the json object isn't an array. If you know it'll be an array you could us JArray.Parse instead. – Luke Z Jun 8 '17 at 23:26
  • 3
    Ah, good point, thanks. I've updated my answer to use JToken instead of JObject. This works with objects or arrays, since JToken is the ancestor class for both JObject and JArray. – asherber Jun 10 '17 at 1:41
  • Thanks a lot, man I wasted around 2 hours to get to this solution... Can't imagine my life without @stackoverflow ... – Rudresha Parameshappa Aug 18 '17 at 9:26
  • 3
    This elegant answer should be voted to the top. – Anlo Oct 19 '17 at 7:32
14

Oneliner using Newtonsoft.Json:

string prettyJson = JToken.Parse(uglyJsonString).ToString(Formatting.Indented);
  • I agree this is the simplest API for formatting JSON using Newtonsoft – Ethan Wu Apr 5 '18 at 9:39
7

You may use following standard method for getting formatted Json

JsonReaderWriterFactory.CreateJsonWriter(Stream stream, Encoding encoding, bool ownsStream, bool indent, string indentChars)

Only set "indent==true"

Try something like this

    public readonly DataContractJsonSerializerSettings Settings = 
            new DataContractJsonSerializerSettings
            { UseSimpleDictionaryFormat = true };

    public void Keep<TValue>(TValue item, string path)
    {
        try
        {
            using (var stream = File.Open(path, FileMode.Create))
            {
                var currentCulture = Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;
                Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = CultureInfo.InvariantCulture;

                try
                {
                    using (var writer = JsonReaderWriterFactory.CreateJsonWriter(
                        stream, Encoding.UTF8, true, true, "  "))
                    {
                        var serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(type, Settings);
                        serializer.WriteObject(writer, item);
                        writer.Flush();
                    }
                }
                catch (Exception exception)
                {
                    Debug.WriteLine(exception.ToString());
                }
                finally
                {
                    Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = currentCulture;
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(exception.ToString());
        }
    }

Pay your attention to lines

    var currentCulture = Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;
    Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = CultureInfo.InvariantCulture;
    ....
    Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = currentCulture;

You should use InvariantCulture to avoid exception during deserialization on the computers with different Regional settings. For example, invalid format of double or DateTime sometimes cause them.

For deserializing

    public TValue Revive<TValue>(string path, params object[] constructorArgs)
    {
        try
        {
            using (var stream = File.OpenRead(path))
            {
                var currentCulture = Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;
                Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = CultureInfo.InvariantCulture;

                try
                {
                    var serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(type, Settings);
                    var item = (TValue) serializer.ReadObject(stream);
                    if (Equals(item, null)) throw new Exception();
                    return item;
                }
                catch (Exception exception)
                {
                    Debug.WriteLine(exception.ToString());
                    return (TValue) Activator.CreateInstance(type, constructorArgs);
                }
                finally
                {
                    Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = currentCulture;
                }
            }
        }
        catch
        {
            return (TValue) Activator.CreateInstance(typeof (TValue), constructorArgs);
        }
    }

Thanks!

1

First I wanted to add comment under Duncan Smart post, but unfortunately I have not got enough reputation yet to leave comments. So I will try it here.

I just want to warn about side effects.

JsonTextReader internally parses json into typed JTokens and then serialises them back.

For example if your original JSON was

 { "double":0.00002, "date":"\/Date(1198908717056)\/"}

After prettify you get

{ 
    "double":2E-05,
    "date": "2007-12-29T06:11:57.056Z"
}

Of course both json string are equivalent and will deserialize to structurally equal objects, but if you need to preserve original string values, you need to take this into concideration

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