9

Is there a way to detect if the windows/os language changed even when my app is not in focus?
So far I was able to achieve what I wanted only if the app was focused using:

string language = "";
System.Windows.Input.InputLanguageManager.Current.InputLanguageChanged +=
new System.Windows.Input.InputLanguageEventHandler((sender, e) =>
{
    language = e.NewLanguage.DisplayName;
    MessageBox.Show(language);
});

But as you can understand, this is not exactly what I want..

I was thinking about other solution such as hooking the keys that change the language (for example alt+shift) but I wont be able to know what language is currently in use and a user can change the default hotkey...

Would appreciate your help.

  • 1
    You did not actually change the input language for your process. Only for whatever process was in the foreground. Normal behavior for the Language Bar. – Hans Passant Oct 28 '14 at 20:08
  • @HansPassant I didnt understand that, but what I want is to hook whenever language changes... – Ron Oct 29 '14 at 17:53
  • 1
    @Run - I'd like to confirm one thing. Am I right that it is not enough for you that InputLanguageChanged event will be generated when focus returns back to your application. – Michał Komorowski Nov 4 '14 at 19:12
  • @MichałKomorowski yes, You are correct. I want to call function whenever the input language changes, regardless if my app is in focus or not. – Ron Nov 4 '14 at 20:07
  • @Ron I think what Hans was saying is that the input language doesn't actually change for your application until it is brought into the foreground. – Mike Strobel Nov 4 '14 at 20:14
9
+50

The problem you are facing is related with how WM_INPUTLANGCHANGE message works. This message is sent to programs by operating system in order to inform them about language changes. However, according to documentation this message is sent only to "to the topmost affected window". It means that you can even call a native method GetKeyboardLayout (it is used by InputLanguageManager by the way) but if an application is not active GetKeyboardLayout will always return the last known, outdated, language.

Taking this into account it might be a good idea to use the solution pointed by @VDohnal i.e. find the current topmost window and read keyboard layout for it. Here is a quick proof of concept how to do it inside WPF application. I used an additional thread that periodically finds the topmost window and ready keyboard layout for it. The code is far from being perfect but it works and it might help you to implement your own solution.

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    static extern IntPtr GetKeyboardLayout(uint idThread);
    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    private static extern IntPtr GetForegroundWindow();
    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    static extern uint GetWindowThreadProcessId(IntPtr hWnd, IntPtr processId);

    private CultureInfo _currentLanaguge;

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                while (true)
                {
                    HandleCurrentLanguage();
                    Thread.Sleep(500);
                }
            });
    }

    private static CultureInfo GetCurrentCulture()
    {
        var l = GetKeyboardLayout(GetWindowThreadProcessId(GetForegroundWindow(), IntPtr.Zero));
        return new CultureInfo((short)l.ToInt64());
    }

    private void HandleCurrentLanguage()
    {
        var currentCulture = GetCurrentCulture();
        if (_currentLanaguge == null || _currentLanaguge.LCID != currentCulture.LCID)
        {
            _currentLanaguge = currentCulture;
            MessageBox.Show(_currentLanaguge.Name);
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This is more then enough. All I want to do is show a baloon box with the current language + play sound whenever language changes. I didnt give u the bounty, because as you said, there might be a better or "perfect" solution. I will give u the bounty 1 day before it ends unless there's a better solution – Ron Nov 5 '14 at 20:57
  • 2
    No sense in tying up a task pool thread indefinitely; create the task with TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning to use a thread detached from the pool. – Mike Strobel Nov 6 '14 at 20:04
  • @MikeStrobel How do I use it? – Ron Nov 12 '14 at 17:41
  • 1
    @Ron Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { ... }, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning) – Mike Strobel Nov 12 '14 at 17:48
  • @MichalKomorowski There's a bug with you solution. sometimes, spontaneously, when I swap between windows or minimize-maximize it shows the messagebox twice, one with the previous language and one with the current language. I couldn't understand why.. – Ron Nov 16 '14 at 19:48

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