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(If your lazy see bottom for TL;DR)

Hello, I am planning to build a new (prototype) project dealing with physical computing. Basically, I have wires. These wires all need to have their voltage read at the same time. More than a few hundred microseconds difference between the readings of each wire will completely screw it up. The Arduino takes about 114 microseconds. So the most I could read is 2 or 3 wires before the latency would skew the accuracy of the readings.

So my plan is to have an Arduino as the "master" of an array of ATTinys. The arduino is pretty cramped for space, but it's a massive playground compared to the tinys. An ATTiny13A has 1k of flash ROM(program space), 64 bytes of RAM, and 64 bytes of (not-durable and slow) EEPROM. (I'm choosing this for price as well as size)

The ATTinys in my system will not do much. Basically, all they will do is wait for a signal from the Master, and then read the voltage of 1 or 2 wires and store it in RAM(or possibly EEPROM if it's that cramped). And then send it to the Master using only 1 wire for data.(no room for more than that!).

So far then, all I should have to do is implement trivial voltage reading code (using built in ADC). But this communication bit I'm worried about. Do you think a communication protocol(using just 1 wire!) could even be implemented in such constraints?

TL;DR: In less than 1k of program space and 64 bytes of RAM(and 64 bytes of EEPROM) do you think it is possible to implement a 1 wire communication protocol? Would I need to drop to assembly to make it fit?

I know that currently my Arduino programs linking to the Wiring library are over 8k, so I'm a bit concerned.

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  • This was a confusing question since 1wire is an actual bus. Apparently this wasn't about that. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1-Wire
    – XTL
    Oct 20, 2010 at 7:29

8 Answers 8

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Since you only need to send data (which is simpler than receiving) and you can select your own protocol, it should not be a problem to fit the code in the available memory space.

I once created software for an industrial control panel that contained 8x14 segment LCD display, some LEDs, some buttons, a serial (I2C) EEPROM, and serial interface to the host. A 4 bit processor was used. The device did not have any serial interface, so both the RS232C interface and I2C bus had to be implemented in software. On top of that, there was Modbus protocol (which among other things requires CRC calculations some exact timing), and the application program.

The device had some 128 x 4 bits of RAM and 1kW, 2kW, 3kW or 4kW of ROM (10 bits per word). The size of the final program was about 1100 words, so it did not quite fit in the smallest device. I used Assembler, of course.

However, instead of using multiple microcontrollers, you could consider using a hardware solution.

You could use a sample and hold circuit. For that, you need an array of analog switches and capacitors and perhaps op-amps. Just issue a trigger to latch all the voltages into the capacitors. Then you can use as much time as you need to read the voltages with your master processor.

Update: Forgot to mention that there are ready-made sample-and-hold amplifiers that need very little or no external components. This is probably the easiest solution.

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1k of program space should be plenty, considering that your protocol only needs to be complicated enough to send a single integer when tickled. Look into Manchester Encoding.

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You can probably get away with using a C compiler that targets this architecture, but you'll have to create your own runtime environment and not rely on the one supplied with the compiler. That's doable, but I'm not sure if the additional work to essentially create your own mini-OS outweighs the productivity benefit of using C over assembler.

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  • "You can [...] get away with using a C compiler" - Definitely, avr-gcc for example, which supports all AVRs that have RAM.
    – JimmyB
    Feb 12, 2013 at 11:21
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I've done embedded programming in similar constraints. I used Borland Turbo C (it was a long time ago) in the tiny model and obtained code that was hardly bulkier than I could have done in assembler, with a fraction of the effort. What I'm saying is: It's quite feasible and sensible to use C as a high level assembler.

Just like me, though, you will be facing the problem of providing C with a (tiny) runtime environment. Ideally, you will only need to set up the stack and a few registers. Also, you won't have room for the C library, so you will need to program any needed functions yourself.

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  • I don't have room for the entire C library on my Arduino right now and I program comfortably on it :P I love doing low level work though. Also, I will be using avr-gcc. Also, I'm not sure of the machine code compactness when comparing x86 and avr code.
    – Earlz
    Apr 18, 2010 at 9:31
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Yes, probably, though if you know your compiler very well you might be able to get away with c.

What you could do, is use a compiler to emit any standalone functions you need based on c code, then glue them together with a little of your own. (You'll certainly have to do the c runtime setup yourself - stacks etc.)

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  • Well, I believe avr-gcc comes with a simple crt0 that will bootstrap main but good point. Have to check into it.
    – Earlz
    Apr 18, 2010 at 9:35
  • Yes, but that crt0 probably also includes code to set up a heap, and possibly other unnecessary code too, so it may well be a waste of space to use it.
    – James
    Apr 19, 2010 at 9:17
  • are you sure? I don't think any AVR chip has over 128k of program space, and there is not a avr-libc(and hence malloc and free) due to those restrictions.
    – Earlz
    Apr 19, 2010 at 22:49
  • Nope, I'm not sure (hence 'probably', 'may' ;)! it's still a good idea to check how big the crt is though.
    – James
    Apr 19, 2010 at 23:18
  • C-compilers for microcontrollers usually generate simple cstartup code and any necessary interrupt vectors, and that's about it. If you do not use C library functions, very little code is generated in addition to your own functions.
    – PauliL
    Apr 23, 2010 at 15:33
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You may consider upgrading to the ATTiny25. It is a more capable 8-pin AVR that includes Atmel's Universal Serial Interface. It is capable of doing 1-wire serial comms in hardware, given only a few bytes of software.

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  • Yes I've actually looked at those and bought a couple but I will need a massive amount of microcontrollers so I wanted to go as cheap as possible.
    – Earlz
    May 28, 2010 at 19:10
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    attiny13 in bulk is about $1, attiny25 in bulk is about $1.10. I think you're very likely to get a lot more than 10% more functionality if serial comms are your main goal.
    – Sparr
    May 28, 2010 at 19:33
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    where at? at sparkfun there was like $1.50 difference between them last I checked.
    – Earlz
    May 28, 2010 at 19:52
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    Those are prices from mouser.com, buying 100 units at a time. Digikey probably has similar prices. If you are going to need more than 1000 chips, consider sourcing them directly from Atmel, I think they come 1060 to a reel. Never buy in bulk from SparkFun, their prices are a bit inflated for qty1, let alone qty100.
    – Sparr
    May 28, 2010 at 20:18
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Why wouldn't you just use sample-and-hold hardware, rather than a pile of microcontrollers?

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    The short answer: because I'm a noob.
    – Earlz
    May 28, 2010 at 19:51
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I designed a master-slave system recently using an AT90USB646 master and ATtiny85 slaves. Obviously I had a lot more memory to work with on the slaves, but what I wanted to share with you is this:

With regard to your communication protocol, bear in mind that the uncalibrated internal oscillator on the ATtiny13 has an accuracy of +/- 10%. This means you won't be able to use, e.g., RS-232 communications.

I used a variant of the Dallas 1-Wire protocol in my system. Including full support for slave enumeration etc., the C source code compiles into 1626 bytes.

Edit: Whoops, didn't realize the question is so old. Hopefully this may still be of some help.

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