2

I'm pretty new to both C++ and templates, and I'm trying to adapt a helper class that can be used to make delegates from member functions.

I changed this code (which compiles):

Delegate<void, int, int>* cheaty(void (Renderer::*method)(int, int), Renderer* obj)
    {
         auto maker = DelegateMaker<Renderer, void, int, int>();
         return maker.BindPointer<&Renderer::MoveCamera>(obj);
    }

To this:

 Delegate<void, int, int>* cheaty(void (Renderer::*method)(int, int), Renderer* obj)
    {
         auto maker = DelegateMaker<Renderer, void, int, int>();
         return maker.BindPointer<method>(obj);
    }

Which doesn't compile and gives the following error: error: 'method' is not a valid template argument for type 'void (Engine::Renderer::*)(int, int)'. Is what I am trying to achieve simply impossible because of limitations in C++ templates? Or am I just missing something really obvious?

Edit: Ideally, what I'd like to have is a function like this:

    template<typename T, typename return_type, typename... params>
    Delegate<return_type, params...>*   make_delegate_pointer(return_type (T::*name)(params...), T* obj)
    {
        DelegateMaker<T, return_type, params...> maker = DelegateMaker<T, return_type, params...>();
        return maker.BindPointer<name>(obj);
    }

And then call it like this auto delegate = Delegates::make_delegate_pointer(&Class::Method, &classInstance); Only, the problem I keep running into is the fact that there seems to be some difference between calling BindPointer like this maker.BindPointer<&Class::Method>(classInstance); and calling it like this maker.BindPointer<return_type (Class::*)(arguments...)>(classInstance);.

However, return_type (T::*)(params...) memberFuncPointer = &Class::Method compiles fine. Which means that logically, maker.BindPointer<return_type (T::*)(params...)>(classInstance) should compile as well (or some variation on that, which is why in the orginal question I attempted to use method as void (Renderer::*method)(int, int)). But it doesn't.

3

Template parameter values must be known at compile-time, but your method value is not known until runtime since cheaty() does not know which method of Renderer is being passed to it. Thus the compiler error. You will have to change BindPointer to not use a template anymore. Besides, DelegateMaker already knows the method signature, so you do not need to duplicate that information as template parameters in BindPointer(), let it inherit the values from DelegateMaker.

For example (untested, might need some tweaking, but you should get the general idea):

template <typename ReturnType, typename... ParamTypes>
class Delegate
{
public:
    virtual ReturnType Invoke(ParamTypes... params) = 0;
};

template <typename ClassType, typename ReturnType, typename... ParamTypes>
class DelegateMaker
{
public:
    typedef ReturnType (ClassType::*MethodType)(ParamTypes... params);

private:
    class DelegateImpl : public Delegate<ReturnType, ParamTypes...> 
    {
    private:
        ClassType* _obj;
        MethodType _method;

    public:
        DelegateImpl(ClassType *obj, MethodType method)
            : _obj(obj), _method(method)
        {
        }

        virtual ReturnType Invoke(ParamTypes... params)
        {
            return (_obj.*_method)(params);
        }
    };

public:
    Delegate<ReturnType, ParamTypes...>* BindPointer(MethodType method, ClassType *obj)
    {
        return new DelegateImpl(obj, method);
    }
};

template <typename ClassType, typename ReturnType, typename... ParamTypes>
Delegate<ReturnType, ParamTypes...>* make_delegate_pointer(
    DelegateMaker<ClassType, ReturnType, ParamTypes...>::MethodType method,
    ClassType* obj)
{
    DelegateMaker<ClassType, ReturnType, ParamTypes...> maker;
    return maker.BindPointer(method, obj);
}

auto delegate = Delegates::make_delegate_pointer(&Class::Method, &classInstance); 
5
  • Please see the edit to my question. While I understand that those values must be know at compile time, I don't see how the compiler can't resolve that. Because it is know at compile time, in the form of the method parameter. And does it matter exactly what method of renderer is passed to it? Shouldn't the method just fit in the pattern void (Renderer::)(int, int)? Oct 29 '14 at 9:39
  • No, the value of method is not known at compile time, that is the problem. It is a runtime value. Imagine if you have 2+ Renderer methods that you pass to cheaty(), eg: cheaty(&Renderer::DoThis, SomeRendererObject); cheaty(&Renderer::DoThat, SomeRendererObject);. cheaty() is not itself a template function, so the compiler cannot create different versions of it based on which method is passed at compile-time. All cheaty() is being given is a pair of memory addresses that cannot be determined at compile-time, only at run-time. Oct 29 '14 at 16:08
  • Okay, but isn't it the type of method that should be used, instead of the value of method? In the case of cheaty it being void (Renderer::*)(int, int). Because if Renderer::DoThis` and Renderer::DoThat have the same return type, parameters and are member functions of the class Renderer. Renderer::DoThis and Renderer::DoThat have the same type (void (Renderer::*)(int, int)). Which is used for the templating, right? Oct 29 '14 at 22:53
  • The method parameter is a pointer, not a type. It has a type that the compiler uses to make sure you cannot pass an incompatible class method to cheaty(). But the value of method is a runtime pointer. That is why the value of method cannot be used as a template parameter at compile-time. However, you might try using decltype(method) as a template parameter, and pass the value of method as an input parameter so the delegate can use that value with the .* operator. Oct 29 '14 at 23:56
  • Okay, very stupid of me to miss that. I had a look at the code in your answer and used that fix the issue. So thanks a lot! Oct 30 '14 at 20:13

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