9

I am trying to modify the value of local variable through another called function, but I am not able to figure out what all values pushed onto the stack are.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void fun()
{
  int i; 
  int *p=&i; 
  int j; 
  for(j=0;*(p+j)!=10;j++);
  printf("%d",j);
  /* Stack Frame size is j int pointers. */ 
  *(p+j)=20; 
}    

main()
{
  int i=10;
  fun();
  printf("\n %d \n",i);
}

How exactly does j in fun() equal to 12? I am trying to understand what values are pushed onto stack. More specifically, can we change the value of i which is in main() without using a for loop in fun() and is it possible to predict the value of j inside fun()?

18
  • 2
    It could be simpler. void fun(int* ip) { *ip = 20; } int main() { int i = 10; fun(&i); }
    – R Sahu
    Commented Oct 29, 2014 at 3:50
  • 2
    @RSahu: The purpose of question is to understand what values are pushed onto stack
    – debonair
    Commented Oct 29, 2014 at 3:53
  • 1
    @DickTanner That question is at best distantly related to this one.
    – Jim Balter
    Commented Oct 29, 2014 at 3:59
  • 3
    a variable doesn't necessarily have to be on stack
    – phuclv
    Commented Oct 29, 2014 at 4:00
  • 1
    @JimBalter Good point! When I ran it it still printed 10. Changing the original number to 12345 resulted in the expected 20 for i in main and 14 for j in fun.
    – ooga
    Commented Oct 29, 2014 at 4:07

2 Answers 2

3

When you have to access local variables from other function calls, I think you had better redesign your code.

Theoretically, you can direct to modify the i of main() in fun() if you can completely understand how the compilers deal with the activation records of function calls on the run-time stack. You can read "Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools" for details( http://www.amazon.com/Compilers-Principles-Techniques-Tools-Edition/dp/0321486811 )

enter image description here

The value of j depends on the run-time stack address between the int i; in the fun() and int i = 10; in main() . In this case, when fun() is called, their relative distance on stack is just 12. That is why the j is 12. So the *(p + j) = 20; actually changed the i of the main(). If you change your code by adding int a = 14; as following, you will find the value of j changed for the activation record on the run-time stack has been changed.

#include <stdio.h>

void fun()
{
  int i;
  int *p=&i;
  int j;
  for(j=0;*(p+j)!=10;j++);
  printf("%d",j);
  /* Stack Frame size is j int pointers. */
  *(p+j)=20;
}

main()
{
  int i=10;
  int a=14;  /* add this for example to change the relative address i in the main and i in the fun*/
  fun();
  printf("\n %d \n",i);
}
2
  • "in the fun i will be initialized by 0 if you don not explicitly assign something to it" -- no it won't. The value is undefined and in most implementations will be whatever junk is in the stack location or register used to hold i. if it happens to be 10, then j will be 0. The rest of what you wrote is too convoluted for me to parse.
    – Jim Balter
    Commented Oct 29, 2014 at 22:30
  • @JimBalter: Yes, you are right. I'll try my best to express my idea well and I have edited the answer.
    – Yulong Ao
    Commented Oct 30, 2014 at 2:39
0

Here in fun()

  • i contains 0 or some garbage value
  • p contains the addresses of i

In the for loop j is initially 0 and the for loop will run until the value in the address p+j !=10 and j is incremented.

So there is no way to correctly predict the outcome of the print in fun()

and also before getting out of the fun() you are trying to assign 20 to the memory location p=j where j could be any value [0,+infinity) no way of telling correctly

meanwhile the print func in main() will display value of local i that is 10 that is if the address of this i in main() in not equal to p+j

1
  • 1
    You're missing the whole point of the OP's code. It assigns a stack address to p, then searches the stack until it finds the value 10, which presumably gives the offset between local variable i in fun and local variable i in main ... assuming that both of these variables are on the stack, there is no other instance of 10 on the stack inbetween, and that the stack grows downward.
    – Jim Balter
    Commented Oct 29, 2014 at 22:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.