I have followed several links on Google and on this forums to reduce EBS Volumes on Amazon AWS, including these links too:

http://wiki.jokeru.ro/shrink-amazon-ebs-root-volume

and

http://www.lantean.co/shrinking-ebs-volume/

I have a 254 GB EBS Volume which needs to be resized to 150 GB. Here are the steps what I did:

  1. Create a new instance with 8 GB volume /dev/xvde (base OS)
  2. Mount 254 GB Volume /dev/xvdj on base OS.
  3. Mount 150 GB empty Volume /dev/xvdk on base OS.
  4. /dev/xvdj has 8 partitions as follows:

Disk /dev/xvdj: 272.7 GB, 272730423296 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 33157 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00029527

    Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/xvdj1   *           1          13      102400   83  Linux
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/xvdj2              13        6540    52428800   83  Linux
/dev/xvdj3            6540       10457    31457280   83  Linux
/dev/xvdj4           10457       33114   181998592    5  Extended
/dev/xvdj5           10457       11501     8388608   82  Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/xvdj6           11501       12154     5242880   83  Linux
/dev/xvdj7           12154       12285     1048576   83  Linux
/dev/xvdj8           12285       33114   167314432   83  Linux

  1. Since /dev/xvdk is empty volume, it has no partition, which i suppose has to be created according to /dev/xvdj
  2. According to the links above, I ran e2fsck -f /dev/xvdj1, followed by resize2fs -M -p /dev/xvdj1, for all the partitions on /dev/xvdj (except /dev/xvdj4 and 5)
  3. After the above command is completed, I created partitions on /dev/xvdk volume according to the requirements, keeping in mind about the sizes which will be greater than the partitions of /dev/xvdj
  4. The partitions of 150 GB Volume is as follows:

Disk /dev/xvdk: 161.1 GB, 161061273600 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19581 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xeea3d8c8

Device     Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/xvdk1   *           1         132     1060258+  83  Linux
/dev/xvdk2             133        9271    73409017+  83  Linux
/dev/xvdk3            9272       17105    62926605   83  Linux
/dev/xvdk4           17106       19581    19888470    5  Extended
/dev/xvdk5           17106       18150     8393931   82  Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/xvdk6           18151       19456    10490413+  83  Linux
/dev/xvdk7           19457       19581     1004031   83  Linux
    

  1. For the first partition, I also added a bootable flag using fdisk /dev/xvdk and selecting a and partition number (which is 1)
  2. After partitions, I followed the above links to count the blocks, issuing the dd command to copy data.
  3. When the dd command was completed, I ran e2fsck -f /dev/xvdk1, followed by resize2fs -p /dev/xvdk1, for all the partitions on /dev/xvdk (except /dev/xvdk4 and 5)
  4. After completing the above command, I powered off the base OS and then detached the 150 GB Volume.
  5. I created a snapshot of the the 150 GB Volume, and after the snapshot was created, I created an image (AMI) out of that snapshot.
  6. I used this image to launch an instance, to which I was successfull, but after launching I am unable to connect to that instance.
  7. Also, 1 of the 2 status checks were throwing an error about connectivity, which I am unable to investigate where could I have gone wrong.

Can someone tell me where I have gone wrong or Am I completely off the track?

  • I'm also struggling with the same scenario. Did you manage to get this solved? – Javier Segura Sep 3 '15 at 9:04
  • I'm having the same issue. Any one find a solution? I've been racking my brain at this for hours! Please help. – thiesdiggity Oct 23 '15 at 5:17
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have found out an elegant solution which was present in the knowledge base of AWS.

The link is here: http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/storage_expand_partition.html#expanding-partition-parted

It makes use of parted tool.

NOTE: You need to attach the volume to a different instance in order to resize it.

  • 1
    Can you be more specific? Link-only answers are bad for the quality of the site. – Artjom B. Oct 26 '15 at 12:26
  • Actually the link itself is very thorough (AWS Documentations) and my adding of content may not be of any impact. – kintuparantu Nov 20 '15 at 11:47

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