39

I have the following HTML and CSS:

body { background-color: gray; }
h1 {
  color: white;
  font-size: 2.5em;
}
<h1>WHAT CARRER SHOULD YOU HAVE ?</h1>

Which renders like this:

enter image description here

I want to add a stroke around it, that means a black border around these text.
I Googled and found -webkit-text-stroke, and came up with:

body { background-color: gray; }
h1 {
  color: white;
  font-size: 2.5em;
  -webkit-text-stroke: 2px black;
}
<h1>WHAT CARRER SHOULD YOU HAVE ?</h1>

However, the effect is not what I want:

enter image description here

As you can see, it seems that the stroke is added inside the text, which make the text looks too thin for me.

How can I make the stroke outside the text?

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/jpjbk1z7/

PS: only webkit support is needed

3

14 Answers 14

58

For a smooth outside stroke emulated by text shadow, use the following 8-axis shadow:

  text-shadow:
    -1px -1px 0 #000,
     0   -1px 0 #000,
     1px -1px 0 #000,
     1px  0   0 #000,
     1px  1px 0 #000,
     0    1px 0 #000,
    -1px  1px 0 #000,
    -1px  0   0 #000;

For customisation, you can use this SASS mixin instead (although changing the size does have side effects on rendering):

@mixin stroke($color: #000, $size: 1px) {
  text-shadow:
    -#{$size} -#{$size} 0 $color,
     0        -#{$size} 0 $color,
     #{$size} -#{$size} 0 $color,
     #{$size}  0        0 $color,
     #{$size}  #{$size} 0 $color,
     0         #{$size} 0 $color,
    -#{$size}  #{$size} 0 $color,
    -#{$size}  0        0 $color;
}

This gives a very smooth stroke, without missing parts, like on the 4 axis solution.

5
  • Very cool and simple. The only thing is, I can't understand why it appears to have a slightly thicker stroke on the top than the bottom. Until I zoom in, then it looks correct.
    – BBaysinger
    Nov 24, 2018 at 2:23
  • 1
    Thank you, Ryall ! Your 8-Axis "outline" rescued me when trying to emulate an outline around a subtitle text. I had tried canvas, but then found that doesn't support underlines. Using JS - with variables used to replace the user selected pixel widths - have solved the software conundrum in a couple of hours. Jun 10, 2020 at 11:25
  • Thanks but what if instead of "#{$" use "var(...)"? Rendering will suffer either way?
    – DDRRSS
    Dec 13, 2021 at 5:36
  • 1
    It only works with 1px. Any other value will yield an unpleasant result Apr 28, 2023 at 15:27
  • S's fail to render properly because of their shape. This solution is fine, but doesn't work as well as you'd hope.
    – UXerUIer
    Mar 25 at 22:36
55

Firefox and Safari now support a new CSS property called paint-order which can be used to simulate an outside stroke:

h1 {
  color: #00ff01;
  font-size: 3em;
  -webkit-text-stroke: 5px black;
}

.fix-stroke {
   paint-order: stroke fill;
}
<h1>the default often is ugly</h1>
<h1 class="fix-stroke">paint-order: stroke fill 😀</h1>

Screenshot:

CSS paint-order screenshot

9
  • 5
    Will be great if this gets added to Chrome also!
    – Ryall
    Jan 17, 2019 at 13:07
  • 5
    Yes, unfortunately it still doesn't work in Chrome :( Jun 9, 2020 at 20:06
  • 2
    @mmaismma Thanks for the edit but the support table on caniuse.com is about paint-order support on SVG <text> elements. Unfortunately Google Chrome still doesn't support paint-order on HTML elements.
    – Salman
    Jul 29, 2020 at 0:58
  • 9
    @RockyKev No, unfortunately it does not. See my comment above. (Or just click the "Run code snippet" button above using Chrome)
    – Salman
    Aug 17, 2020 at 6:51
  • 5
    Now in 2023 and Chrome still doesn’t support paint-order for HTML elements. May 10, 2023 at 2:21
25

One option is to use text-shadow to simulate a stroke. Example:

text-shadow:
    -1px -1px 0 #000,  
     1px -1px 0 #000,
    -1px  1px 0 #000,
     1px  1px 0 #000;
2
  • 6
    this is as good a cross-browser solution as you will get... unfortunately, with thicker borders, this looks strange on serif fonts. Oct 29, 2014 at 15:38
  • For a smoother version, use 8 axis instead of 4. See my answer for the code.
    – Ryall
    Nov 27, 2017 at 12:36
14

The -webkit-text-stroke doesn't support placing the stroke on the outside of the text

as this CSS-Tricks article explains:

The stroke drawn by text-stroke is aligned to the center of the text shape (as is the default in Adobe Illustrator), and there is currently no option to set the alignment to the inside or outside of the shape. Unfortunately this makes it much less usable, as no matter what now the stroke interferes with the shape of the letter destroying the original type designers intent. A setting would be ideal, but if we had to pick one, outside stroke would have been much more useful.

What about SVG?

Well it seems that it also places the stroke on the inside -

FIDDLE

However,

you might be able to simulate this effect (depending on what you need) by:

  1. Change your font to a sans serif like verdana and

  2. Increase the font-size of the text you are adding a stroke to.

body {
  background: grey;
  font-family: verdana;
}
.stroke,
.no-stroke {
  color: white;
  font-size: 2.5em;
}
.stroke {
  -webkit-text-stroke: 2px black;
   font-size: 2.7em;
}
<h1 class="stroke">WHAT CAREER SHOULD YOU HAVE?</h1>
<h1 class="no-stroke">WHAT CAREER SHOULD YOU HAVE?</h1>

2
  • 3
    It is now possible to place the stroke outside the text with paint-order May 28, 2018 at 15:24
  • 3
    @FelipeCortez shame it isn't supported in many browsers (e.g. Chrome) because paint-order would be really useful
    – drmrbrewer
    Mar 3, 2019 at 12:27
13

Further elaborating on the other text-shadow solutions, for pixel-perfect thick round outlines the number of shadows should increase with the radius of the stroke. For example, a 10px thick outline requires 2⋅10⋅π ≈ 63 shadows distributed in all directions. To generate this in javascript, one could something like:

  const color = "#FFF" /* white outline */
  const r = 10 /* width of outline in pixels */
  const n = Math.ceil(2*Math.PI*r) /* number of shadows */
  var str = ''
  for(var i = 0;i<n;i++) /* append shadows in n evenly distributed directions */
  {
    const theta = 2*Math.PI*i/n
    str += (r*Math.cos(theta))+"px "+(r*Math.sin(theta))+"px 0 "+color+(i==n-1?"":",")
  }
  document.querySelector("#myoutlinedtext").style.textShadow = str

example of thick outlined text

If the thickness is static, then just run this once to generate the string and paste it into your CSS.

2
5

One way I found was to stack two elements on each other having the element that stays behind get the double stroke width. The element behind leaks the stroke to the outside of the visible element making it a true stroke outside.

Also, another option is to use :after to create this second element. The downside is that you can't programmatically change the stroke

This might not work properly on big stroke values.

body { background-color: gray; }
h1 {
  color: white;
  font-size: 2.5em;
  font-family: verdana;
}

.stroke { -webkit-text-stroke: 2px black; }

.stack .stroke { -webkit-text-stroke: 4px black; }
h1.stroke-fs { font-size: 2.7em; }

.stack { position: relative; }
.stack > h1:not(:first-child) {
  left: 0;
  margin: 0;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
}


.stroke-after:after { 
  -webkit-text-stroke: 4px black;
  content: attr(value);
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  z-index: -1;
}
Stack
<div class="stack">
  <h1 class="stroke">WHAT CARRER SHOULD YOU HAVE ?</h1>
  <h1>WHAT CARRER SHOULD YOU HAVE ?</h1>
</div>

<hr />

After
<div style="position: relative">
  <h1 class="stroke-after" value="WHAT CARRER SHOULD YOU HAVE ?">WHAT CARRER SHOULD YOU HAVE ?</h1>
</div>

<hr />

Native
<h1 class="stroke">WHAT CARRER SHOULD YOU HAVE ?</h1>

<hr />

Font size
<h1 class="stroke stroke-fs">WHAT CARRER SHOULD YOU HAVE ?</h1>

1
1

I have also tried text-shadow and -webkit-text-stroke, but unsuccessful in all ways. I could only get the result by making two divs(background and foreground) i.e,

background div with -webkit-text-stroke and foreground div without -webkit-text-stroke.

<div style="position:absolute;width:1280px;height:720px;left:0px;top:0px" >
    <div style="color:#CDCDCD;
                font-family:sans-serif;
                font-size:57px;
                -webkit-text-stroke-color:black;
                -webkit-text-stroke-width:0.04em;" >
        <p>
            Text with outine stroke outwards.
        </p>
    </div>
</div>

<div style="position:absolute;width:1280px;height:720px;left:0px;top:0px" >
    <div style="color:#CDCDCD;
                font-family:sans-serif;
                font-size:57px;" >
        <p>
            Text with outine stroke outwards.
        </p>
    </div>
</div>

Bt the only problem with the html generated through is twice the size(size in memory) as the div is repeated twice.

Does anyone has some better solution?

0
1

I know this is an old question but have a look at this:

https://jsfiddle.net/1dbta9cq/

you can simply place another text on top of the stroked text with absolute positioning, it's not so tidy but it solves the problem

<div class="container">
  <h1 class="stroke">Stroke</h1>
  <h1 class="no-stroke">Stroke</h1>
</div>

.container{
  width:300px;
}

.stroke{
  position:absolute;
  -webkit-text-stroke: 10px black;
}

.no-stroke{
  color:white;
  position:absolute
}
1

Here’s a SCSS mixin for simulating text outlines with multiple shadows:

@use "sass:math";
@use 'sass:list';

@mixin text-outline($offset, $color, $num-steps: 16) {
  $shadows: ();
  @for $i from 0 to $num-steps {
    $angle: $i * 360deg / $num-steps;
    $x: calc(#{math.cos($angle)} * #{$offset});
    $y: calc(#{math.sin($angle)} * #{$offset});
    $shadows: list.append($shadows, #{$x} #{$y} 0 #{$color}, $separator: comma);
  }
  text-shadow: $shadows;
}

For larger offsets, a greater number of shadows (“steps”) is required for good results. Note that in general, however, more shadows will be more expensive for the browser to render.

Example:

span {
  color: #FF004D;
  @include utils.type-outline(
    $offset: calc(0.05rem + 0.05em),
    $color: #FFFFFF,
    $num-steps: 32
  );
}

Result: white outline around text

0

Text shadow might be used to achieve this result http://css3generator.com

2
  • 1
    With text-shadow you can just get some blurred shadow and the best you can get for border solid with this is just 1px ... I don't think the OP wants that. Also avoid just link answer include some code an example to get upvotes :)
    – DaniP
    Oct 29, 2014 at 15:33
  • Not really a fair comment, especially considering the correct answer and its improvement. However, the answer still doesn't support an upvote. The broken link, for one thing.
    – Parapluie
    Sep 28, 2021 at 18:22
0

Here's a SASS mixin I created to make it easy to create a text outline using the prefixed properties (-webkit, -moz) when supported, but falling back to just a color with text shadow. Note that the fallback doesn't work well with opaque fill colors, but other than that I think it's a pretty good solution, until we can get a standard method that has better browser support.

Fiddle

Mixin

@mixin text-stroke($fill-color, $stroke-color, $stroke-width) {
  color: $fill-color;
  text-shadow: -$stroke-width -$stroke-width 0 $stroke-color,
                $stroke-width -$stroke-width 0 $stroke-color,
               -$stroke-width  $stroke-width 0 $stroke-color,
                $stroke-width  $stroke-width 0 $stroke-color;

  @supports ((-webkit-text-stroke-color: $stroke-color) and (-webkit-text-fill-color: white))
            or ((-moz-text-stroke-color: $stroke-color) and (-moz-text-fill-color: white)) {
                        color: unset;
                  text-shadow: unset;
         -moz-text-fill-color: $fill-color;
      -webkit-text-fill-color: $fill-color;
       -moz-text-stroke-color: $stroke-color;
    -webkit-text-stroke-color: $stroke-color;
       -moz-text-stroke-width: $stroke-width;
    -webkit-text-stroke-width: $stroke-width;
  }
}

Example Usage

(Makes text semi-transparent black with a white outline)

.heading-outline {
  @include text-stroke(rgba(#000,.5), #fff, 1px);
}
0

Add a custom attribute which is the same as the node's text content, and define a pseudo-class ::before which acts as the non-stroked text, which will be rendered in front of the stroked text, creating the desired illusion of a text being stroked on the outside only:

label {
  user-select: none;
}

label:has(:checked) ~ .stroke::before {
  content: attr(data-text);
  position: absolute;
  pointer-events: none; /* for text selection */
  -webkit-text-stroke: 0px;
}

.stroke {
  margin: .5em;
  font: 60px arial;
  
  /* trick */
  position: relative;
  -webkit-text-stroke: 20px purple;
  color: cyan;
}
<label>
  <input type=checkbox checked> With trick
</label>
<h1 class="stroke" data-text="Nice little trick">Nice little trick</h1>

In the future, when Chrome solves this, you could simply delete the ::before selector.


I've opened a request in the CSS community to improve the content property: https://github.com/w3c/csswg-drafts/issues/8894

0

html:

<div class="text-stroke" data-text="Your text">Your text</div>

css:

.text-stroke {
    position: relative;
    color: white;
    
    &:after {
        content: attr(data-text);
        position: absolute;
        left: 0;
        top: 0;
        -webkit-text-stroke: 2px #000;
        -webkit-text-fill-color: transparent;
        z-index: -1;
    }
}
2
  • As it’s currently written, your answer is unclear. Please edit to add additional details that will help others understand how this addresses the question asked. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Aug 16, 2023 at 9:05
  • I like this solution, great use of css multi layer and attr function!
    – vdegenne
    Mar 28 at 10:09
-1

I'm obviously late to the party but I find the easiest is probably the best way forward to a solution.

For me, I did the outside stroke effect by just making the weight of the font larger.

body { background-color: gray; }
h1 {
  color: white;
  font-size: 2.5em;
  font-weight: bold;
  -webkit-text-stroke: 2px black;
}

Is it the most correct ?
Depending on the situation then the answer is yes Or no.

Does it work in your use case ?
...for me , yes perfefctly.

0

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