I don't really understand how modulus division works. I was calculating 27 % 16 and wound up with 11 and I don't understand why.

I can't seem to find an explanation in layman's terms online. Can someone elaborate on a very high level as to what's going on here?

17 Answers 17

up vote 96 down vote accepted

The result of a modulo division is the remainder of an integer division of the given numbers.

That means:

27 / 16 = 1, remainder 11
=> 27 mod 16 = 11

Other examples:

30 / 3 = 10, remainder 0
=> 30 mod 3 = 0

35 / 3 = 11, remainder 2
=> 35 mod 3 = 2
  • 50
    please don't take this the wrong way, but your examples do not clear anything up for someone that has absolutely no clue what's going on with modulous divison. You left out very important steps that explain where that remainder comes from. Marcin M.'s answer below explained the process better. Please consider being more detailed in future answers for those of us that may not have a grasp on a concept at all. Thank you for being a contributing member to the community though! People like you help me out, and continue to help me out on my educational journey :) – Soundfx4 May 1 '15 at 1:36
  • great. Thanks for making it easy to understand. – kapil Sep 22 '17 at 21:26

Most explanations miss one important step, let's fill the gap using another example.

Given the following:

Dividend: 16
Divisor: 6

The modulus function looks like this:

16 % 6 = 4

Let's determine why this is.

First, perform integer division, which is similar to normal division, except any fractional number (a.k.a. remainder) is discarded:

16 / 6 = 2

Then, multiply the result of the above division (2) with our divisor (6):

2 * 6 = 12

Finally, subtract the result of the above multiplication (12) from our dividend (16):

16 - 12 = 4

The result of this subtraction, 4, the remainder, is the same result of our modulus above!

  • 1
    And just to confirm, 16/6 is integer division which means that the answer will always be rounded down – ytpillai Jul 21 '15 at 9:40
  • This answer helped me way more than the choosen one. I was having trouble understanding why 5 % 3 = 2. – KeineMaster Aug 3 '15 at 13:32
  • 1
    How do you get 2 out of 16 / 6 and not 2,6666666667? Should you always just ignore the 0,...? Why? – Luc Jun 29 '16 at 16:37
  • 1
    @Luc As Leo and ytpillai mention, we're using integer division (where the fractional part of the result after dividing is discarded). In Python 3: 16 // 6 >>> 2 and 16 / 6 >>> 2.6666666666666665 – bryik Nov 6 '16 at 20:30
  • 2
    Hoping my edits helped clear up any confusion! – Gifford N. Apr 26 '17 at 21:01

Maybe the example with an clock could help you understand the modulo.

A familiar use of modular arithmetic is its use in the 12-hour clock, in which the day is divided into two 12 hour periods.

Lets say we have currently this time: 15:00
But you could also say it is 3 pm

This is exactly what modulo does:

15 / 12 = 1, remainder 3

You find this example better explained on wikipedia: Wikipedia Modulo Article

The simple formula for calculating modulus is :-

[Dividend-{(Dividend/Divisor)*Divisor}]

So, 27 % 16 :-

27- {(27/16)*16}

27-{1*16}

Answer= 11

Note:

All calculations are with integers. In case of a decimal quotient, the part after the decimal is to be ignored/truncated.

eg: 27/16= 1.6875 is to be taken as just 1 in the above mentioned formula. 0.6875 is ignored.

Compilers of computer languages treat an integer with decimal part the same way (by truncating after the decimal) as well

  • What about 3 % 7 ? – eaglei22 Jan 3 at 14:30
  • So it would just be 3? – eaglei22 Jan 3 at 14:31

The modulus operator takes a division statement and returns whatever is left over from that calculation, the "remaining" data, so to speak, such as 13 / 5 = 2. Which means, there is 3 left over, or remaining from that calculation. Why? because 2 * 5 = 10. Thus, 13 - 10 = 3.

The modulus operator does all that calculation for you, 13 % 5 = 3.

  • I think this answer explains it the best from a conceptual standpoint. Other answers explain mathematically which is also necessary, but this better helps me understand how I could apply the modulo operator. – JonnyB Mar 19 '15 at 12:33

modulus division is simply this : divide two numbers and return the remainder only

27 / 16 = 1 with 11 left over, therefore 27 % 16 = 11

ditto 43 / 16 = 2 with 11 left over so 43 % 16 = 11 too

Very simple: a % b is defined as the remainder of the division of a by b.

See the wikipedia article for more examples.

I hope these simple steps will help:

20 % 3 = 2 
  1. 20 / 3 = 6; do not include the .6667 – just ignore it
  2. 3 * 6 = 18
  3. 20 - 18 = 2, which is the remainder of the modulo
  • Could you please format this answer a little better? – Code Maverick Apr 8 '14 at 16:53
  • Check Code Jammer's answer. – Ajmal Salim May 9 '17 at 3:51

Modulus division gives you the remainder of a division, rather than the quotient.

Lets say you have 17 mod 6.

what total of 6 will get you the closest to 17, it will be 12 because if you go over 12 you will have 18 which is more that the question of 17 mod 6. You will then take 12 and minus from 17 which will give you your answer, in this case 5.

17 mod 6=5

Modulus division is pretty simple. It uses the remainder instead of the quotient.

    1.0833... <-- Quotient
   __
12|13
   12
    1 <-- Remainder
    1.00 <-- Remainder can be used to find decimal values
     .96
     .040
     .036
     .0040 <-- remainder of 4 starts repeating here, so the quotient is 1.083333...

13/12 = 1R1, ergo 13%12 = 1.


It helps to think of modulus as a "cycle".

In other words, for the expression n % 12, the result will always be < 12.

That means the sequence for the set 0..100 for n % 12 is:

{0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,0,[...],4}

In that light, the modulus, as well as its uses, becomes much clearer.

Easier when your number after the decimal (0.xxx) is short. Then all you need to do is multiply that number with the number after the division.

Ex: 32 % 12 = 8

You do 32/12=2.666666667 Then you throw the 2 away, and focus on the 0.666666667 0.666666667*12=8 <-- That's your answer.

(again, only easy when the number after the decimal is short)

I would like to add one more thing:

it's easy to calculate modulo when dividend is greater/larger than divisor

dividend = 5 divisor = 3

5 % 3 = 2

3)5(1
  3
-----
  2

but what if divisor is smaller than dividend

dividend = 3 divisor = 5

3 % 5 = 3 ?? how

This is because, since 5 cannot divide 3 directly, modulo will be what dividend is

It's simple, Modulus operator(%) returns remainder after integer division. Let's take the example of your question. How 27 % 16 = 11? When you simply divide 27 by 16 i.e (27/16) then you get remainder as 11, and that is why your answer is 11.

Write out a table starting with 0.

{0,1,2,3,4}

Continue the table in rows.

{0,1,2,3,4}
{5,6,7,8,9}
{10,11,12,13,14}

Everything in column one is a multiple of 5. Everything in column 2 is a multiple of 5 with 1 as a remainder. Now the abstract part: You can write that (1) as 1/5 or as a decimal expansion. The modulus operator returns only the column, or in another way of thinking, it returns the remainder on long division. You are dealing in modulo(5). Different modulus, different table. Think of a Hash Table.

When we divide two integers we will have an equation that looks like the following:

A/B​​ =Q remainder R

A is the dividend; B is the divisor; Q is the quotient and R is the remainder

Sometimes, we are only interested in what the remainder is when we divide A by B. For these cases there is an operator called the modulo operator (abbreviated as mod).

Examples

16/5= 3 Remainder 1  i.e  16 Mod 5 is 1.
0/5= 0 Remainder 0 i.e 0 Mod 5 is 0.
-14/5= 3 Remainder 1 i.e. -14 Mod 5 is 1.

See Khan Academy Article for more information.

In Computer science, Hash table uses Mod operator to store the element where A will be the values after hashing, B will be the table size and R is the number of slots or key where element is inserted.

See How does a hash table works for more information

This was the best approach for me for understanding modulus operator. I will just explain to you through examples.

16 % 3

When you division these two number, remainder is the result. This is the way how i do it.

16 % 3 = 3 + 3 = 6; 6 + 3 = 9; 9 + 3 = 12; 12 + 3 = 15

So what is left to 16 is 1

16 % 3 = 1

Here is one more example: 16 % 7 = 7 + 7 = 14 what is left to 16? Is 2 16 % 7 = 2

One more: 24 % 6 = 6 + 6 = 12; 12 + 6 = 18; 18 + 6 = 24. So remainder is zero, 24 % 6 = 0

protected by Community Apr 28 '15 at 5:08

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