275

This question already has an answer here:

Given file names like these:

/the/path/foo.txt
bar.txt

I hope to get:

foo
bar

Why this doesn't work?

#!/bin/bash

fullfile=$1
fname=$(basename $fullfile)
fbname=${fname%.*}
echo $fbname

What's the right way to do it?

marked as duplicate by tripleee bash Aug 22 '16 at 10:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

558

You don't have to call the external basename command. Instead, you could use the following commands:

$ s=/the/path/foo.txt
$ echo ${s##*/}
foo.txt
$ s=${s##*/}
$ echo ${s%.txt}
foo
$ echo ${s%.*}
foo

Note that this solution should work in all recent (post 2004) POSIX compliant shells, (e.g. bash, dash, ksh, etc.).

Source: Shell Command Language 2.6.2 Parameter Expansion

More on bash String Manipulations: http://tldp.org/LDP/LG/issue18/bash.html

  • 48
    fantastic answer... bash String Manipulations ( like ${s##*/} ) are explained here linuxgazette.net/18/bash.html – chim Dec 20 '11 at 15:00
  • 6
    @chim have you found an updated reference to your link? It's dead. – Droogans Jul 9 '14 at 19:59
  • 25
    @Droogans found it after some digging :) tldp.org/LDP/LG/issue18/bash.html didn't realise I had 27 upvotes on this comment :) – chim Jul 11 '14 at 10:07
  • 1
    Very handy, used this with file expansion and select. Example: options=~/path/user.* and then select result in ${options[@]##*/}; – Anthony Hatzopoulos Nov 10 '14 at 19:19
  • 17
    Is there a way to combine ##*/ at %.* (by nesting or piping or whatnot) arrive at foo directly? – bongbang Nov 26 '14 at 22:09
257

The basename command has two different invocations; in one, you specify just the path, in which case it gives you the last component, while in the other you also give a suffix that it will remove. So, you can simplify your example code by using the second invocation of basename. Also, be careful to correctly quote things:

fbname=$(basename "$1" .txt)
echo "$fbname"
  • 8
    Is there a way of making it remove any suffix? – w4etwetewtwet Nov 2 '13 at 9:39
  • 1
    @handuel Unfortunately, basename does not support wildcards. Providing a second argument will only remove that exact literal string from the end. – toxalot Mar 18 '14 at 17:52
  • 3
    On machines with basename 8.4, it works just as just as specified in this answer, but for me (with basename 8.22 from GNU coreutils) this worked as basename -s <extension> <filename>. – SeldomNeedy Nov 24 '15 at 23:00
  • @w4etwetewtwet - You can have basename remove any extension, see stackoverflow.com/a/36341390/2707864 – sancho.s Mar 31 '16 at 18:55
52

A combination of basename and cut works fine, even in case of double ending like .tar.gz:

fbname=$(basename "$fullfile" | cut -d. -f1)

Would be interesting if this solution needs less arithmetic power than Bash Parameter Expansion.

  • 2
    This is my preferred way - with the minor change of using $(..) - so this becomes: fbname=$(basename "$fullfile" | cut -d. -f1) – FarmerGedden Apr 22 '15 at 13:06
  • This is a nice solution in that it will snip all (dot) extensions. – user2023370 Jun 1 '15 at 13:41
  • 1
    If a file has dots elsewhere in the name, this would truncate it incorrectly. This may work better: fbname=$(basename "$fullfile" | sed -r 's|^(.*?)\.\w+$|\1|'). More choices: : 's|^(.*?)\..+$|\1|', 's|^(.*?)\.[^\.]+$|\1|'. – Pysis Nov 14 '18 at 18:34
15

Pure bash, no basename, no variable juggling. Set a string and echo:

s=/the/path/foo.txt
echo ${s//+(*\/|.*)}

Output:

foo

Note: the bash extglob option must be "on", (on Ubuntu it's "on" by default), if it's not, do:

shopt -s extglob

Walking through the ${s//+(*\/|.*)}:

  1. ${s -- start with $s.
  2. // substitute every instance of the pattern.
  3. +( match one or more of the pattern list in parenthesis, (i.e. until item #7 below).
  4. 1st pattern: *\/ matches anything before a literal "/" char.
  5. pattern separator | which in this instance acts like a logical OR.
  6. 2nd pattern: .* matches anything after a literal "." -- that is, in bash the "." is just a period char, and not a regex dot.
  7. ) end pattern list.
  8. } end parameter expansion -- since there's no / (which would precede a string substitute), the matched patterns are substituted with nothing; this deletes the matches.

Relevant man bash background:

  1. pattern substitution:
  ${parameter/pattern/string}
          Pattern substitution.  The pattern is expanded to produce a pat‐
          tern just as in pathname expansion.  Parameter is  expanded  and
          the  longest match of pattern against its value is replaced with
          string.  If pattern begins with /, all matches  of  pattern  are
          replaced   with  string.   Normally  only  the  first  match  is
          replaced.  If pattern begins with #, it must match at the begin‐
          ning of the expanded value of parameter.  If pattern begins with
          %, it must match at the end of the expanded value of  parameter.
          If string is null, matches of pattern are deleted and the / fol‐
          lowing pattern may be omitted.  If parameter is @ or *, the sub‐
          stitution  operation  is applied to each positional parameter in
          turn, and the expansion is the resultant list.  If parameter  is
          an  array  variable  subscripted  with  @ or *, the substitution
          operation is applied to each member of the array  in  turn,  and
          the expansion is the resultant list.
  1. extended pattern matching:
  If the extglob shell option is enabled using the shopt builtin, several
   extended  pattern  matching operators are recognized.  In the following
   description, a pattern-list is a list of one or more patterns separated
   by a |.  Composite patterns may be formed using one or more of the fol‐
   lowing sub-patterns:

          ?(pattern-list)
                 Matches zero or one occurrence of the given patterns
          *(pattern-list)
                 Matches zero or more occurrences of the given patterns
          +(pattern-list)
                 Matches one or more occurrences of the given patterns
          @(pattern-list)
                 Matches one of the given patterns
          !(pattern-list)
                 Matches anything except one of the given patterns
13

Here are oneliners:

  1. $(basename ${s%.*})
  2. $(basename ${s} .${s##*.})

I needed this, the same as asked by bongbang and w4etwetewtwet.

9

Here is another (more complex) way of getting either the filename or extension, first use the rev command to invert the file path, cut from the first . and then invert the file path again, like this:

filename=`rev <<< "$1" | cut -d"." -f2- | rev`
fileext=`rev <<< "$1" | cut -d"." -f1 | rev`
  • I've never seen those triple angle bracket <<< doohickeys--what's that? – Alex Hall Sep 12 '16 at 4:32
  • They are called "Here Strings" (more info here), basically it takes the input as a string and feed it to your program as it was reading through stdin. – higuaro Sep 12 '16 at 5:00
2

If you want to play nice with Windows file paths (under Cygwin) you can also try this:

fname=${fullfile##*[/|\\]}

This will account for backslash separators when using BaSH on Windows.

0

Just an alternative that I came up with to extract an extension, using the posts in this thread with my own small knowledge base that was more familiar to me.

ext="$(rev <<< "$(cut -f "1" -d "." <<< "$(rev <<< "file.docx")")")"

Note: Please advise on my use of quotes; it worked for me but I might be missing something on their proper use (I probably use too many).

  • You do not need a single quote, you try to do the same as: rev <<< file.docx | cut -f1 -d. | rev just without the quotes and without the nested sub shells. Also I don't think the above can work at all. – matthias krull May 16 '17 at 22:59
-10

Use the basename command. Its manpage is here: http://unixhelp.ed.ac.uk/CGI/man-cgi?basename

  • 7
    He is using basename, but that's not his problem. – chepner Jul 18 '12 at 14:26

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