47

This question already has an answer here:

I have an MVC application that displays a value. This is the controller:

public ActionResult Index(DataSites DataSiteList)
{
    if (DataSiteList.Latitude != null)
    {
        DataSites test = new DataSites();
        test.Latitude = "LATITUDE";

        return View(test);
    }
    return View(DataSiteList);
}
public ActionResult SomeInformation()
{
    DataSites test1 = new DataSites();
    test1.Latitude = "LATITUDE2";

     return RedirectToAction("Index", test1);
}

The View:

@model miniproj2.Models.DataSites

<p>
    @Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.Latitude)
</p>

And the Model:

public class DataSites
{
    public string Latitude { get; set; }
}

When I go to /Home/SomeInformation, the DataSites' Latitude property is set to "LATITUDE2". Then redirects to the Index() action in the controler, sets the property to "LATITUDE" and returns the view.

When it shows the view, it displays the value "LATITUDE2" as set in the redirect. Shouldn't "LATITUDE" be displayed?

marked as duplicate by bjb568, CodeCaster c# Nov 2 '14 at 14:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Install fiddler and watch what actually happens when you call RedirectToAction - your answer is there. – asawyer Oct 30 '14 at 13:54
  • 1
    DataSiteList.Altitude != null is it a misspelling or the altitude property actually exist in your model DataSites? – Aymeric Oct 30 '14 at 13:58
  • 1
    Try this, replace the return RedirectToAction("Index", test1); to return Index(text1);. – user4196352 Oct 30 '14 at 13:59
  • 1
    @AdrienTancrez Maybe you should start, it's an invaluable debugging tool for web development. – asawyer Oct 30 '14 at 14:01
  • 1
    @TiagoSilva That's not a great solution as the url won't change. – asawyer Oct 30 '14 at 14:03
95

Your problem is (step by step)

  1. Your SomeInformation() method sets the value of test1.Latitude to "LATITUDE2".
  2. You then pass that model to your Index() method using the overload of RedirectToAction that accepts an object. Internally this uses reflection to build a RouteValueDictionary based on the properties of your model (in this case its simply latitude="LATITUDE2").
  3. When you hit the Index method the model is bound by the DefaultModelBinder and now the value of DataSiteList.Latitude is "LATITUDE2" (which is why you enter the if block)
  4. In the process of binding, the DefaultModelBinder sets the ModelStatevalue of Latitude to "LATITUDE2". Any attempts to set the value of Latitude are now ignored because the view uses ModelState value to render the control.

It not clear what your trying to do here. You can make it work as you expect by adding ModelState.Clear(); as the first line of your Index() method. This clears all existing ModelState values an you can now set the value to "LATITUDE".

But your if block makes no sense. Perhaps you were just doing some kind of test, but you may as well remove the parameter from the Index() method and just initialize a new instance of DataSites in the method.

Edit

To give a bit more information as to why updating a model property has no affect once ModelState has been set.

Imagine you have a form to collect user information where the model contains int Age. The user is asked to enter their age and someone enters "I'm five next week!". Of course this wont bind to an int so the DefaultModelBinder adds the value (the attemptedValue) and adds a ModelStateError.

When the view is returned it will typically display an error message such as "The field Age must be a number". If the html helper rendering the control used the model value, then it would display "0" (the default value for int). It would be somewhat confusing for the user to see "0" in the textbox and next it a message saying it must be a number (What! but zero is a number and what the heck happened to what I entered?). So instead, the helper uses the value from ModelState and now the users sees "I'm five next week!" and an associated error message that makes sense for the value.

So even though you thoughts were that "its not logical", there is actually some logic to this behavior.

-5

You are not setting Altitude. It will be null so the code will never go into this block and set Lattitude to "LATTITUDE"

    if (DataSiteList.Altitude != null)
    {
        DataSites test = new DataSites();
        test.Latitude = "LATITUDE";

        return View(test);
    }
  • The value of Altitude is being set (in the SomeInformation method). If the if block was not hit then the view would display an empty string not "LATITUDE2" as OP has stated. – user3559349 Oct 30 '14 at 22:18
  • 1
    My answer was submitted before the OP fixed that section of the code. Before it was fixed, the code was setting Latitude and Checking Altitude. Now, the code sets Latitude checks Latitude... not altitude, like you have in your comment. – Keith Oct 31 '14 at 9:44
  • 2
    Altitude or Latitude makes no difference. This has absolutely nothing to do with OP's problem. – user3559349 Oct 31 '14 at 20:39
  • 1
    @StephenMuecke Actually I disagree. If he was setting one property (Latitude), then checking another for not being null (Altitude) when it was still null, it would never try to re-instantiate DataSites and fill that new property (Latitude) with anything, because the property being checked (Altitude) would've still been null, therefore not meeting that if condition. – vapcguy Oct 25 '18 at 13:48

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.