11

I have a for loop and structure like this:

for(....)
....
....
if(isTrue)
... do something..
.. method to be executed once (doTrick) is declared outside for loop.
....endif
endfor

public void doTrick()
...
...
..end

Is it possible for a method in for loop to be executed only once?

  • what is the difference? – Gandalf StormCrow Apr 19 '10 at 8:13
  • 1
    All-caps implies that it's an acronym, which it is not. – Michael Borgwardt Apr 19 '10 at 8:15
  • @Gandalf It's not an acronym but a name so you don't write it uppercase – Andrea Polci Apr 19 '10 at 8:16
  • 3
    hmm well we all knew what I meant so there was no difference as James say .. – Gandalf StormCrow Apr 19 '10 at 8:23
40

Sure!..

if(!alreadyExecuted) {
    doTrick();
    alreadyExecuted = true;
}
  • 21
    In a multithreaded environment you might wish to synchronize that block. – extraneon Apr 19 '10 at 8:29
  • Presumably though the alreadyExecuted is going to be a local variable though, – vickirk Apr 19 '10 at 10:40
8

Your can use AtomicBoolean to make sure the task is only called the first time:

public class Once {
    private AtomicBoolean done = new AtomicBoolean();

    public void run(Runnable task) {
        if (done.get()) return;
        if (done.compareAndSet(false, true)) {
            task.run();
        }
    }
}

Usage:

Once once = new Once();
once.run(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        foo();
    }
});

// or java 8
once.run(() -> foo());
5

You can avoid the if() by using this trick:

private Runnable once;
private final static Runnable NOP = new Runnable () {
    public void run () {
        // Do nothing
    }
}

public void method () {
    once = new Runnable () {
        public void run () {
            doTrick();
            once = NOP;
        }
    }

    for (...) {
        ...
        once.run();
        ...
    }
}
  • That would work but it's a bit overkill isn't it? Rosdi's answer is much simpler/clearer. – vickirk Apr 19 '10 at 10:42
  • 1
    -1 Why would you want to avoid the if() ? – Tomas Apr 19 '10 at 11:02
  • 9
    @Tomas: To expand your horizon :-) – Aaron Digulla Apr 20 '10 at 8:08
  • @vickirk: It is for such a simple case. As soon as the conditions become more complex and you need more than one "run once" per loop, this trick can become much more readable since you can extract code out of the loop at little cost. – Aaron Digulla Apr 20 '10 at 8:09
  • Sorry, not convinced, if the code to go in the if is complicated then move it into a private method, if the logic became more complex then the op would need to refactor at that point, probably going down the strategy/template method route. This way makes unit testing more complicated, and using a runnable would have developers trying to figure out where threading becomes invovled. – vickirk Apr 20 '10 at 18:50
3

In Java 8, you can effectively do this using automatic memoization as described here: Do it in Java 8: Automatic memoization

I'll admit that memoization could be considered overkill for a "run once" scenario, but it is a rather clean alternative to some described in previous answers.

For instance:

public void doSomething() { ... }

Map<Boolean, Boolean> cache = new ConcurrentHashMap<>();

public void doSomethingOnce() {
  cache.computeIfAbsent(true, x -> {
    doSomething();
    return true;
  });
}
2

perhaps the break keyword is what you need? After running you method call break; I am sorry its not 100% clear what you mean from your question.

Have a look here from the sun docs

  • A break would end the for-loop immediately. As the loop contains more code, than only the method-call, I assume a break isn't intended. – Mnementh Apr 19 '10 at 11:01
2

Another overkill solution:

Depending on what you want to do, it might be possible to use a static initialization block.

public class YourKlass{
    public void yourMethod(){

        DoTrick trick; 

        for( int i = 0; condition; i++){
            // ... (1)
            trick = new DoTrick(); // or any kind of accessing DoTrick
            // ... (2)
        }

    } 
}

public class DoTrick{
    static{
        // Whatever should be executed only once 
    }
}

Simple solution:

Or, instead you just want to execute the first part outside of the loop:

int i = 0;
if( condition ){
    // ... (1)
    // do trick
    // ... (2)
}
for(i = 1; condition; i++){
    // ... (1)
    // ... (2)
}
  • -1 First solution is overkill, second solution is not IN the loop. – Tomas Apr 19 '10 at 11:02
1
import java.util.ArrayList;

class RemoveDuplicate {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ArrayList<String> originalList = new ArrayList<String>();
        originalList.add("foo");
        originalList.add("bar");
        originalList.add("bat");
        originalList.add("baz");
        originalList.add("bar");
        originalList.add("bar");
        String str="bar";
        ArrayList<String> duplicateList = new ArrayList<String>();

        // adding duplicates to duplicateList
        for(String currentString : originalList) {
        if(currentString.startsWith(str)) {
                duplicateList.add(currentString);
            }
        }
        // removing duplicates in duplicatesList
        for(String removeString : duplicateList) {
            originalList.remove(removeString);
        }
        // finally adding duplicateElement
        originalList.add(str);

        for(String currEntry : originalList) {
            System.out.println(currEntry);
        }
    }
}
  • How is this related to the question? – Aaron Digulla Jun 15 '17 at 8:24
0

my sample from my app:

boolean alreadyExecuted = false;

then :

private void startMyService() {

    if(!alreadyExecuted) {

        final Handler handler = new Handler();
        handler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
          @Override
          public void run() {
            //Do something after 4 seconds
              context.startService(new Intent(context, myService.class));
              alreadyExecuted = true;
          }
        }, 4000);
       }
  • alreadyExecuted is not used in your post code. – TYZRPVX Jul 17 '18 at 9:22

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