24

sample code:

main ()
{
printf ("size = %d\n", sizeof (main));
}
  • 6
    My guess is that the -1 was because of TIAS ("try it and see"). – luqui Apr 19 '10 at 9:54
  • 12
    The problem with TIAS is that it usually doesn't work, because all you see is what your current compiler with your current options actually does, which could be quite different from what a compiler is supposed to do. Something that's just been proven another time with the discussions found below. (You actually have to add a -pedantic option to GCC's command line to observe the "official" behavior. And that's just one compiler) So here's a +1 from me just to counter the stupid TIAS down-vote. – sbi Apr 19 '10 at 10:18
13

C standard forbids it - when compiled with gcc -pedantic, it produces invalid application of ‘sizeof’ to a function type warning.

However gcc compiles it and returns 1 for sizeof(main), and it is not a size of function pointer.

It seems to be compiler-dependent.

  • 2
    While gcc may compile it, it is not clear that it is performing the translation from main to &main. For example, codepad--which uses gcc 4.1.2--returns a size of 1 for sizeof(main) but a size of 4 for sizeof(&main). – Matthew T. Staebler Apr 19 '10 at 10:26
  • @Aeth You are completely correct, I got the same result with latest and greatest GCC 4.5. Post edited. – qrdl Apr 19 '10 at 10:49
6

The sizeof Operator

 sizeof unary-expression
 sizeof ( type-name )

The operand is either an identifier that is a unary-expression, or a type-cast expression (that is, a type specifier enclosed in parentheses). The unary-expression cannot represent a bit-field object, an incomplete type, or a function designator. The result is an unsigned integral constant. The standard header STDDEF.H defines this type as size_t.

Use compilation flag -Wall -pedantic to emit warning about incorrect operand to sizeof (remember sizeof is a compilation time operator), Code:

$ cat sizeof.c 
#include<stdio.h> 
int main(){
    printf("%zu %p\n", sizeof(main), (void*)main);
    return 0;
} 

Compilation message with GCC version 4.6.3 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.3-1ubuntu5):

$ gcc -Wall -pedantic sizeof.c -std=c99
sizeof.c: In function ‘main’:
sizeof.c:3:30: warning: invalid application of ‘sizeof’ to a function type 
              [-pedantic]
sizeof.c:3:38: warning: ISO C forbids conversion of function pointer to 
              object pointer type [-pedantic]

Read also:

6.5.3.4 The sizeof operator

1118 — The sizeof operator shall not be applied to an expression that has function type or an incomplete type, to the parenthesized name of such a type, or to an expression that designates a bit-field member
1127 — The value of the result is implementation-defined, and its type (an unsigned integer type) is size_t, defined in <stddef.h> (and other headers)

Additionally, correct format string for size_t is %zu and If it doesn't exists for example Microsoft's compiler then you can use %lu and convert the returned value to unsigned long.

5

ISO C++ forbids applying sizeof to an expression of function type.

ISO/IEC 14882 on C++ says (section 5.3.3):

"The size operator shall not be applied to an expression that has function or incomplete type,..."

The same hold for standard C (ISO/IEC 9899:1999) section 6.5.3.4:

"The sizeof operator shall not be applied to an expression that has function type or an incomplete type, to the parenthesized name of such a type, or to an expression that designates a bit-field member."

  • 1
    What is the rational behind it? – yassin Apr 19 '10 at 9:55
  • 6
    This question is tagged as C, so the C++ standard has no bearing. – Matthew T. Staebler Apr 19 '10 at 10:15
  • @Aeth many parts of the C++ standard are adopted from C. See the updated answer with added reference. – zoli2k Apr 19 '10 at 10:45
  • @yassin: Probably that sizeof is only meaningful for objects, which have a representation as unsigned char [sizeof(type)]. In C, functions do not have representations (there is no conversion from function pointer types to data pointer types) so there's no meaningful use for sizeof. – R.. May 30 '11 at 3:35
1

As per ISO C11 section 6.5.3.4 The sizeof and _Alignof operators, sub-section 1 (constraints):

The sizeof operator shall not be applied to an expression that has function type or an incomplete type, to the parenthesized name of such a type, or to an expression that designates a bit-field member.

There's also a subsection 4 in section 6.3.2.1 Lvalues, arrays, and function designators which states:

A function designator is an expression that has function type. Except when it is the operand of the sizeof operator, the _Alignof operator(65) or the unary & operator, a function designator with type "function returning type" is converted to an expression that has type "pointer to function returning type"".

Foot note 65, referenced from there, clarifies the point:

Because this conversion does not occur, the operand of the sizeof or _Alignof operator remains a function designator and violates the constraints in 6.5.3.4.

As per section 4 Conformance:

In this International Standard, "shall" is to be interpreted as a requirement on an implementation or on a program; conversely, "shall not" is to be interpreted as a prohibition.

Hence a strictly conforming program should never take the size of a function. But, then again, it probably should also use a correct form of main() :-)

There is a loophole here, however. A conforming implementation is allowed to provide extensions "provided they do not alter the behavior of any strictly conforming program" (section 4 Conformance, subsection 6).

You could argue that this is a behavioural change (allowing sizeof(function) rather than disallowing it) but, since the original program wouldn't have been strictly conforming in the first place, the subsection does not forbid it.

  • Conforming implementations may offer extensions so long as they report diagnostics where required, and the extension does not alter the behaviour of any conforming program – M.M Aug 18 '15 at 2:36
  • if my memory is correct, gcc is defined to return 1. correct me if my brain is in jam again. – Jason Hu Aug 18 '15 at 2:51
  • @Matt, good point, I originally saw this as a behavioural change hence disallowed. But, since the change would have been made to a non strictly conforming program, it's irrelevant. Updated the answer to adjust. – paxdiablo Aug 18 '15 at 2:52

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