I am relatively new to Python and want to use a assertRaises test to check for a ValidationError, which works ok. However, I have many ValidationErrors and I want to make sure the right one is returned. I figured I could pass something into assertRaises but it doesn't look like I can, so I figured I would just do an assertTrue and check the exception message. However, I don't know how to access it. Is this even a good way to approach this issue? thanks.

class DailyEntriesTests(TestCase):
def test_cant_have_ip_and_user(self):
    u = createUser(False)
    de = createDailyEntry(u, "1.1.1.1", 1)
    with self.assertRaises(ValidationError) as cm:
        de.full_clean()

    # this line bombs - message doesn't exist. I also tried "error_code" like I saw in the documentation, but that doesn't work
    print(cm.exception.message)

    self.assertTrue(cm.exception.message.contains("Both"))
up vote 29 down vote accepted

You can just use assertRaisesRegexp.

with self.assertRaisesRegexp(ValidationError, "Both"):
    de.full_clean()

When you use it as a context manager the 2nd argument is a regular expression to search through the exception's string representation.

  • Great answer, thank you. :) – Teekin Jan 1 at 23:44

Since the question is related to Django, you could also use the assertRaisesMessage context manager when inheriting from django's TestCase.

from django.test import TestCase

class ExceptionTest(TestCase):

    def test_call_raises_exception_with_custom_message(self):
        with self.assertRaisesMessage(Exception, 'My custom message!'):
            call_that_causes_exception()

Note: The assertRaisesMessage manager does an 'in' lookup on the exceptions message. So if your exception raises "My custom message!" you could even assert for "custom message". Bear this in mind in case you have defined multiple exceptions returning similar messages (as e.g. the above test would also pass with a message like "My custom message! And here are some further details." which may not be the desired result).

Nowadays you can use assertRaises as a context manager. This way you can capture the exception and inspect it later.

with self.assertRaises(SomeException) as cm:
    do_something()

the_exception = cm.exception
self.assertEqual(the_exception.error_code, 3)
  • 3
    this gave me the following error: '_AssertRaisesContext' object has no attribute 'message' – ems Jun 16 '16 at 22:16
  • I just tested and it is working fine with CPython 3.6.4 – user Oct 2 at 13:44

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