5

I have a matrix (A) in the form of (much larger in reality):

205   204   201
202   208   202

How can I tally the co-incidence of numbers on a column-by-column basis and then output this to a matrix?

I'd want the final matrix to run from min(A):max(A) (or be able to specify a specific range) across the top and down the side and for it to tally co-incidences of numbers in each column. Using the above example:

    200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208
200  0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
201  0   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0
202  0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0 
203  0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
204  0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1
205  0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
206  0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
207  0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
208  0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0

(Matrix labels are not required)

Two important points: The tallying needs to be non-duplicating and occur in numerical order. For example a column containing:

205
202

Will tally this as a 202 occurring with 205 (as shown in the above matrix) but NOT 205 with 202 - the duplicate reciprocal. When deciding what number to use as the reference, it should be the smallest.

EDIT:

enter image description here

4

sparse to the rescue!

Let your data and desired range be defined as

A = [ 205   204   201
      202   208   202 ]; %// data. Two-row matrix
limits = [200 208]; %// desired range. It needn't include all values of A

Then

lim1 = limits(1)-1;
s = limits(2)-lim1;
cols = all((A>=limits(1)) & (A<=limits(2)), 1);
B = sort(A(:,cols), 1, 'descend')-lim1;
R = full(sparse(B(2,:), B(1,:), 1, s, s));

gives

R =
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0

Alternatively, you can dispense with sort and use matrix addition followed by triu to obtain the same result (possibly faster):

lim1 = limits(1)-1;
s = limits(2)-lim1;
cols = all( (A>=limits(1)) & (A<=limits(2)) , 1);
R = full(sparse(A(2,cols)-lim1, A(1,cols)-lim1, 1, s, s));
R = triu(R + R.');

Both approaches handle repeated columns (up to sorting), correctly increasing their tally. For example,

A = [205   204   201
     201   208   205]

gives

R =
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     2     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
3

See if this is what you were after -

range1 = 200:208 %// Set the range

A = A(:,all(A>=min(range1)) & all(A<=max(range1))) %// select A with columns
                                                   %// that fall within range1
A_off = A-range1(1)+1 %// Get the offsetted indices from A

A_off_sort = sort(A_off,1) %// sort offset indices to satisfy "smallest" criteria

out = zeros(numel(range1)); %// storage for output matrix
idx = sub2ind(size(out),A_off_sort(1,:),A_off_sort(2,:)) %// get the indices to be set

unqidx = unique(idx)
out(unqidx) = histc(idx,unqidx) %// set coincidences

With

A = [205   204   201
     201   208   205]

this gets -

out =
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     2     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0

Few performance-oriented tricks could be used here -

I. Replace

out = zeros(numel(range1)); 

with

out(numel(range1),numel(range1)) = 0;

II. Replace

idx = sub2ind(size(out),A_off_sort(1,:),A_off_sort(2,:))  

with

idx = (A_off_sort(2,:)-1)*numel(range1)+A_off_sort(1,:)
  • I think the asker wants numbers greater than 1 in the result if the same column (up to sorting) appears more than once – Luis Mendo Oct 31 '14 at 11:30
  • @LuisMendo Thanks for the heads up there, edited! +1 for you! – Divakar Oct 31 '14 at 11:46
  • Good fix! +1 also now – Luis Mendo Oct 31 '14 at 11:49
  • @Divakar - Stupid question... but would accumarray be useful here too? – rayryeng Oct 31 '14 at 19:15
  • @rayryeng Well not an expert on that..guess you could try out, it has to add like histc, which I think it will. Before that, you gotta get the labels right I suppose. Mostly guesses,best way to see would to try it :) – Divakar Oct 31 '14 at 19:25
3

What about a solution using accumarray? I would first sort each column independently, then use the first row as first dimension into the final accumulation matrix, then the second row as the second dimension into the final accumulation matrix. Something like:

limits = 200:208;
A = A(:,all(A>=min(limits)) & all(A<=max(limits))); %// Borrowed from Divakar

%// Sort the columns individually and bring down to 1-indexing
B = sort(A, 1) - limits(1) + 1;

%// Create co-occurrence matrix
C = accumarray(B.', 1, [numel(limits) numel(limits)]);

With:

A = [205   204   201
     202   208   202]

This is the output:

C =

     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0

With duplicates (borrowed from Luis Mendo):

A = [205   204   201
     201   208   205]

Output:

C =

     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     2     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
  • Seems to be working alright! Actually good job, as the code is pretty compact too. Looks like you have gotten well into accumarray thingy! – Divakar Oct 31 '14 at 19:31
  • @Divakar - Haha thanks :) I learned from chappjc. It's very easy to use once you get the hang of it. – rayryeng Oct 31 '14 at 19:33
  • This looks like a really nice compact solution. I am however still having issues processing my original matrix using A = A(:,all(A>=min(limits)) & all(A<=max(limits))); this simply returns an empty matrix = [] despite values between the limits present. It only works when limits includes 0 as the minimum value. The original matrix does include 0's in some rows but I can't see why it would fail to process in this way. – AnnaSchumann Oct 31 '14 at 20:02
  • @AnnaSchumann - Can you post a sample of what ARE1s1 looks like? Just a few rows. – rayryeng Oct 31 '14 at 20:04
  • The EDIT posted in the OP shows a sample of the matrix. It's got hundreds of columns and rows with variable number of entries. The range given in limits should filter each column down to contain just 2 values which can then be processed with the answers posted throughout here. – AnnaSchumann Oct 31 '14 at 20:06

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