234

I'd like to format a duration in seconds using a pattern like H:MM:SS. The current utilities in java are designed to format a time but not a duration.

22 Answers 22

236

If you don't want to drag in libraries, it's simple enough to do yourself using a Formatter, or related shortcut eg. given integer number of seconds s:

  String.format("%d:%02d:%02d", s / 3600, (s % 3600) / 60, (s % 60));
5
  • 4
    Doesn't have to be integer. If you have two dates, just plug date1.getTime() - date2.getTime() into the above equation which uses the long primitive and still works.
    – Josh
    Commented Nov 5, 2008 at 22:51
  • What if the time difference is longer than 24h?
    – Rajish
    Commented Jul 15, 2011 at 9:43
  • 2
    @Rajish: you'd have to ask the OP what they wanted in that case! Of course you can separate it out into s/86400, (s%86400)/3600... for days if necessary...
    – bobince
    Commented Jul 15, 2011 at 20:37
  • My solution to s > 86400 (one day): "\u221E" - infinity
    – QED
    Commented Aug 23, 2012 at 23:21
  • If the time difference is over 24 hours, it still formats nicely the duration in hours, minutes and seconds. For my use case this is as expected. Commented Aug 29, 2015 at 16:31
195

I use Apache common's DurationFormatUtils like so:

DurationFormatUtils.formatDuration(millis, "**H:mm:ss**", true);
4
  • 21
    The easiest possible way (in apache commons style). You even have formatDurationHMS method that, you'll probably use most of the time.
    – Marko
    Commented Mar 28, 2015 at 22:06
  • 3
    Perfect! You can also add other text within apostrophe: DurationFormatUtils.formatDuration(durationInMillis, "m 'minutes' , s 'seconds'")
    – mihca
    Commented Feb 18, 2020 at 16:21
  • 1
    Unfortunately the Apache stuff isn't localized, it only supports english.
    – frodo2975
    Commented Dec 16, 2022 at 19:06
  • For more readable format use DurationFormatUtils.formatDurationWords(duration.toMillis(), true, true);
    – Knight71
    Commented Feb 4 at 3:52
98

If you're using a version of Java prior to 8... you can use Joda Time and PeriodFormatter. If you've really got a duration (i.e. an elapsed amount of time, with no reference to a calendar system) then you should probably be using Duration for the most part - you can then call toPeriod (specifying whatever PeriodType you want to reflect whether 25 hours becomes 1 day and 1 hour or not, etc) to get a Period which you can format.

If you're using Java 8 or later: I'd normally suggest using java.time.Duration to represent the duration. You can then call getSeconds() or the like to obtain an integer for standard string formatting as per bobince's answer if you need to - although you should be careful of the situation where the duration is negative, as you probably want a single negative sign in the output string. So something like:

public static String formatDuration(Duration duration) {
    long seconds = duration.getSeconds();
    long absSeconds = Math.abs(seconds);
    String positive = String.format(
        "%d:%02d:%02d",
        absSeconds / 3600,
        (absSeconds % 3600) / 60,
        absSeconds % 60);
    return seconds < 0 ? "-" + positive : positive;
}

Formatting this way is reasonably simple, if annoyingly manual. For parsing it becomes a harder matter in general... You could still use Joda Time even with Java 8 if you want to, of course.

16
  • Would you still recommend to use the Joda Time library when using Java 8?
    – Tim Büthe
    Commented Aug 4, 2014 at 17:20
  • 2
    @TimBüthe: No, I'd start using java.time in that case. (Although I can't immediately find an equivalent of PeriodFormatter...)
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Aug 4, 2014 at 17:27
  • 1
    PeriodFormatter isn't included. That one of the differences between Java 8 Date Time API and Joda Time.
    – Tim Büthe
    Commented Aug 4, 2014 at 17:33
  • 1
    @RexKerr: Well, there's still "use Joda Time" if you want to, of course. Will edit again. (Looking back, I should have been recommending Duration anyway, by the sounds of it. Significant edit required...)
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Oct 29, 2015 at 14:56
  • 8
    @MarkJeronimus Even easier would be to use the Durations methods: duration.toHours(), duration.toMinutesPart() and duration.toSecondsPart() which are available since Java 9. And to get the absolute value one can use duration.abs().
    – recke96
    Commented Jun 15, 2018 at 17:25
79

This is easier since Java 9. A Duration still isn’t formattable, but methods for getting the hours, minutes and seconds are added, which makes the task somewhat more straightforward:

    LocalDateTime start = LocalDateTime.of(2019, Month.JANUARY, 17, 15, 24, 12);
    LocalDateTime end = LocalDateTime.of(2019, Month.JANUARY, 18, 15, 43, 33);
    Duration diff = Duration.between(start, end);
    String hms = String.format("%d:%02d:%02d", 
                                diff.toHours(), 
                                diff.toMinutesPart(), 
                                diff.toSecondsPart());
    System.out.println(hms);

The output from this snippet is:

24:19:21

1
  • Equivalent in Kotlin, for your copy-pasting convenience:"${diff.toHours()}:${diff.toMinutesPart()}:${diff.toSecondsPart()}" Commented Nov 29, 2023 at 12:36
30
long duration = 4 * 60 * 60 * 1000;
SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss.SSS", Locale.getDefault());
log.info("Duration: " + sdf.format(new Date(duration - TimeZone.getDefault().getRawOffset())));
4
  • 14
    Hah! Just hit the wall with time zone normalization when used this method. You have to add sdf.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT+0")); before using the format function.
    – Rajish
    Commented Jul 15, 2011 at 9:46
  • It's recommended to use DateFormat.getDateInstance() instead of concrete classes. Commented Jul 25, 2020 at 10:58
  • 2
    This solution is fragile. It will roll over to 00:00:00.000 when the number of hours reaches 24h. Further, negative one second is formatted as 23:59:59.000.
    – V.S.
    Commented Aug 12, 2020 at 8:00
  • I'm using: String .format("Duration %tT", duration - TimeZone.getDefault().getOffset(0)) which works well if you are fine with duration < 24 hours Commented Mar 14, 2022 at 8:36
16

There's a fairly simple and (IMO) elegant approach, at least for durations of less than 24 hours:

DateTimeFormatter.ISO_LOCAL_TIME.format(value.addTo(LocalTime.of(0, 0)))

Formatters need a temporal object to format, so you can create one by adding the duration to a LocalTime of 00:00 (i.e. midnight). This will give you a LocalTime representing the duration from midnight to that time, which is then easy to format in standard HH:mm:ss notation. This has the advantage of not needing an external library, and uses the java.time library to do the calculation, rather than manually calculating the hours, minutes and seconds.

1
  • 1
    good trick,. For period's of more than 24 hours, this gives you the remainder mod 24hrs, which isn't quite what I need, but I agree this is the most elegant so far. Still, I'm rather disappointed that java 8's Duration object doesn't have some built in formatting tools.
    – Groostav
    Commented Jun 25, 2021 at 23:34
13

This answer only uses Duration methods and works with Java 8 :

public static String format(Duration d) {
    long days = d.toDays();
    d = d.minusDays(days);
    long hours = d.toHours();
    d = d.minusHours(hours);
    long minutes = d.toMinutes();
    d = d.minusMinutes(minutes);
    long seconds = d.getSeconds() ;
    return 
            (days ==  0?"":days+" days,")+ 
            (hours == 0?"":hours+" hours,")+ 
            (minutes ==  0?"":minutes+" minutes,")+ 
            (seconds == 0?"":seconds+" seconds,");
}
12

I'm not sure that is you want, but check this Android helper class

import android.text.format.DateUtils

For example: DateUtils.formatElapsedTime()

7

This might be kind of hacky, but it is a good solution if one is bent on accomplishing this using Java 8's java.time:

import java.time.Duration;
import java.time.LocalDateTime;
import java.time.format.DateTimeFormatter;
import java.time.format.DateTimeFormatterBuilder;
import java.time.temporal.ChronoField;
import java.time.temporal.Temporal;
import java.time.temporal.TemporalAccessor;
import java.time.temporal.TemporalField;
import java.time.temporal.UnsupportedTemporalTypeException;

public class TemporalDuration implements TemporalAccessor {
    private static final Temporal BASE_TEMPORAL = LocalDateTime.of(0, 1, 1, 0, 0);

    private final Duration duration;
    private final Temporal temporal;

    public TemporalDuration(Duration duration) {
        this.duration = duration;
        this.temporal = duration.addTo(BASE_TEMPORAL);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isSupported(TemporalField field) {
        if(!temporal.isSupported(field)) return false;
        long value = temporal.getLong(field)-BASE_TEMPORAL.getLong(field);
        return value!=0L;
    }

    @Override
    public long getLong(TemporalField field) {
        if(!isSupported(field)) throw new UnsupportedTemporalTypeException(new StringBuilder().append(field.toString()).toString());
        return temporal.getLong(field)-BASE_TEMPORAL.getLong(field);
    }

    public Duration getDuration() {
        return duration;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return dtf.format(this);
    }

    private static final DateTimeFormatter dtf = new DateTimeFormatterBuilder()
            .optionalStart()//second
            .optionalStart()//minute
            .optionalStart()//hour
            .optionalStart()//day
            .optionalStart()//month
            .optionalStart()//year
            .appendValue(ChronoField.YEAR).appendLiteral(" Years ").optionalEnd()
            .appendValue(ChronoField.MONTH_OF_YEAR).appendLiteral(" Months ").optionalEnd()
            .appendValue(ChronoField.DAY_OF_MONTH).appendLiteral(" Days ").optionalEnd()
            .appendValue(ChronoField.HOUR_OF_DAY).appendLiteral(" Hours ").optionalEnd()
            .appendValue(ChronoField.MINUTE_OF_HOUR).appendLiteral(" Minutes ").optionalEnd()
            .appendValue(ChronoField.SECOND_OF_MINUTE).appendLiteral(" Seconds").optionalEnd()
            .toFormatter();

}
4
  • I just tried this, and I noticed that if I called format for "hh:mm:ss" when I didnt have any hours or minutes to format (eg Duration.ofSeconds(20)), then I'd get an UnsupportedTemporalTypeException). I've simply removed the code checking if the difference is == 01. I figured 01 was some kind of masking value that I dont complete understand, can you explain it?
    – Groostav
    Commented Apr 13, 2015 at 5:38
  • This actually worked very well. On my case I even added milliseconds... Regarding the isSupported method its returning the information if there is a valid field to show on the human readable string. Anyway the "masking" is actually not a mask. The code shows return value!=0l not return value!=01. Please do make use of copy-paste next time.
    – MrJames
    Commented Nov 8, 2016 at 17:13
  • 1
    The interface TemporalAccessor is not supposed to be misused for durations. JSR-310 has designed the interface TemporalAmount for this purpose. Commented Jan 4, 2017 at 13:07
  • 2
    I recommend you always use uppercase L for signifying a long value. It’s so easy to misread lowercase l for digit 1, as just demonstrated.
    – Anonymous
    Commented May 6, 2018 at 13:58
6

Here is one more sample how to format duration. Note that this sample shows both positive and negative duration as positive duration.

import static java.time.temporal.ChronoUnit.DAYS;
import static java.time.temporal.ChronoUnit.HOURS;
import static java.time.temporal.ChronoUnit.MINUTES;
import static java.time.temporal.ChronoUnit.SECONDS;

import java.time.Duration;

public class DurationSample {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        //Let's say duration of 2days 3hours 12minutes and 46seconds
        Duration d = Duration.ZERO.plus(2, DAYS).plus(3, HOURS).plus(12, MINUTES).plus(46, SECONDS);

        //in case of negative duration
        if(d.isNegative()) d = d.negated();

        //format DAYS HOURS MINUTES SECONDS 
        System.out.printf("Total duration is %sdays %shrs %smin %ssec.\n", d.toDays(), d.toHours() % 24, d.toMinutes() % 60, d.getSeconds() % 60);

        //or format HOURS MINUTES SECONDS 
        System.out.printf("Or total duration is %shrs %smin %sec.\n", d.toHours(), d.toMinutes() % 60, d.getSeconds() % 60);

        //or format MINUTES SECONDS 
        System.out.printf("Or total duration is %smin %ssec.\n", d.toMinutes(), d.getSeconds() % 60);

        //or format SECONDS only 
        System.out.printf("Or total duration is %ssec.\n", d.getSeconds());
    }
}
6

How about the following function, which returns either +H:MM:SS or +H:MM:SS.sss

public static String formatInterval(final long interval, boolean millisecs )
{
    final long hr = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(interval);
    final long min = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(interval) %60;
    final long sec = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(interval) %60;
    final long ms = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMillis(interval) %1000;
    if( millisecs ) {
        return String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d.%03d", hr, min, sec, ms);
    } else {
        return String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d", hr, min, sec );
    }
}
6

There is yet another way to make it for java8. But it works if duration is no longer than 24 hours

public String formatDuration(Duration duration) {
    DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern("h:mm.SSS");
    return LocalTime.ofNanoOfDay(duration.toNanos()).format(formatter);
}
4
  • This works nicely but what kind of magic is this? LOL Why and how this actually works? ofNanoOfDay, toNanos... and why LocalTime. In the context of duration this makes no sense :-\ and yet it does the trick.
    – t3chb0t
    Commented Jan 28, 2021 at 11:54
  • 1
    First vote! You made me happy today:) Duration needs to transform into LocalTime to use its format method. As for nanos, they were used to get number of milliseconds, but we can also write something like LocalTime.ofSecondOfDay(duration.getSeconds()).format(formatter)
    – stanley
    Commented Jan 31, 2021 at 15:13
  • Cool! Seconds feel more natural :-] Yeah, it's either a lot work to gain some rep here or you must be very lucky to get hundreds of votes for a question or an answer. People are pretty reluctant about voting. Sometimes in just requries a more time to someone notice your answer. Have fun and thanks again for this short solution. The other ones are so overengineered :)
    – t3chb0t
    Commented Jan 31, 2021 at 16:06
  • 2
    this is bad answer, this will fail if duration is longer than 24 hours!
    – Enerccio
    Commented Oct 21, 2021 at 8:14
6

You can use java.time.Duration which is modelled on ISO-8601 standards and was introduced with Java-8 as part of JSR-310 implementation. With Java-9 some more convenience methods were introduced.

Demo:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        LocalDateTime startDateTime = LocalDateTime.of(2020, Month.NOVEMBER, 10, 15, 20, 25);
        LocalDateTime endDateTime = LocalDateTime.of(2020, Month.DECEMBER, 10, 18, 24, 30);

        Duration duration = Duration.between(startDateTime, endDateTime);
        // Default format
        System.out.println(duration);

        // Custom format
        // ####################################Java-8####################################
        String formattedElapsedTime = String.format("%d:%02d:%02d", duration.toHours(),
                duration.toMinutes() % 60, duration.toSeconds() % 60);
        System.out.println(formattedElapsedTime);
        // ##############################################################################

        // ####################################Java-9####################################
        formattedElapsedTime = String.format("%d:%02d:%02d", duration.toHours(), duration.toMinutesPart(),
                duration.toSecondsPart());
        System.out.println(formattedElapsedTime);
        // ##############################################################################
    }
}

Output:

PT723H4M5S
723:04:05
723:04:05

Online Demo

Important: Note that a Duration object also has a day part. If you want the day part in your result, you have to use duration.toHours() % 24 in Java 8 API or duration.toHoursPart() in Java 9 as shown below:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        LocalDateTime startDateTime = LocalDateTime.of(2020, Month.NOVEMBER, 10, 15, 20, 25);
        LocalDateTime endDateTime = LocalDateTime.of(2020, Month.DECEMBER, 10, 18, 24, 30);

        Duration duration = Duration.between(startDateTime, endDateTime);
        // Default format
        System.out.println(duration);

        // Custom format
        // ####################################Java-8####################################
        String formattedElapsedTime = String.format("%d days %d hour(s) %d minute(s) %d second(s)", duration.toDays(), duration.toHours() % 24,
                duration.toMinutes() % 60, duration.toSeconds() % 60);
        System.out.println(formattedElapsedTime);
        // ##############################################################################

        // ####################################Java-9####################################
        formattedElapsedTime = String.format("%d days %d hour(s) %d minute(s) %d second(s)", duration.toDaysPart(), duration.toHoursPart(),
                duration.toMinutesPart(), duration.toSecondsPart());
        System.out.println(formattedElapsedTime);
        // ##############################################################################
    }
}

Output:

PT723H4M5S
30 days 3 hour(s) 4 minute(s) 5 second(s)
30 days 3 hour(s) 4 minute(s) 5 second(s)

Online Demo

Learn about the modern date-time API from Trail: Date Time.

4

This is a working option.

public static String showDuration(LocalTime otherTime){          
    DateTimeFormatter df = DateTimeFormatter.ISO_LOCAL_TIME;
    LocalTime now = LocalTime.now();
    System.out.println("now: " + now);
    System.out.println("otherTime: " + otherTime);
    System.out.println("otherTime: " + otherTime.format(df));

    Duration span = Duration.between(otherTime, now);
    LocalTime fTime = LocalTime.ofNanoOfDay(span.toNanos());
    String output = fTime.format(df);

    System.out.println(output);
    return output;
}

Call the method with

System.out.println(showDuration(LocalTime.of(9, 30, 0, 0)));

Produces something like:

otherTime: 09:30
otherTime: 09:30:00
11:31:27.463
11:31:27.463
1
  • 4
    This will fail for durations larger than 23:59:59.999. Commented Mar 10, 2017 at 23:01
4

Here's a one-liner for converting a java.time.Duration to a nice string in Kotlin:

duration.run {
   "%d:%02d:%02d.%03d".format(toHours(), toMinutesPart(), toSecondsPart(), toMillisPart())
}

Example output: 120:56:03.004

3
String formatDuration(Temporal from, Temporal to) {
    final StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    for (ChronoUnit unit : new ChronoUnit[]{YEARS, MONTHS, WEEKS, DAYS, HOURS, MINUTES, SECONDS}) {
        long amount = unit.between(from, to);
        if (amount == 0) {
            continue;
        }
        builder.append(' ')
                .append(amount)
                .append(' ')
                .append(unit.name().toLowerCase());
        from = from.plus(amount, unit);
    }
    return builder.toString().trim();
}
1

My library Time4J offers a pattern-based solution (similar to Apache DurationFormatUtils, but more flexible):

Duration<ClockUnit> duration =
    Duration.of(-573421, ClockUnit.SECONDS) // input in seconds only
    .with(Duration.STD_CLOCK_PERIOD); // performs normalization to h:mm:ss-structure
String fs = Duration.formatter(ClockUnit.class, "+##h:mm:ss").format(duration);
System.out.println(fs); // output => -159:17:01

This code demonstrates the capabilities to handle hour overflow and sign handling, see also the API of duration-formatter based on pattern.

1

In scala (I saw some other attempts, and wasn't impressed):

def formatDuration(duration: Duration): String = {
  import duration._ // get access to all the members ;)
  f"$toDaysPart $toHoursPart%02d:$toMinutesPart%02d:$toSecondsPart%02d:$toMillisPart%03d"
}

Looks horrible yes? Well that's why we use IDEs to write this stuff so that the method calls ($toHoursPart etc) are a different color.

The f"..." is a printf/String.format style string interpolator (which is what allows the $ code injection to work) Given an output of 1 14:06:32.583, the f interpolated string would be equivalent to String.format("1 %02d:%02d:%02d.%03d", 14, 6, 32, 583)

3
  • OP asked for a solution to format a duration in seconds in... Java
    – maxxyme
    Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 12:45
  • @maxxyme true enough. But I got to this question with a scala search term. The other scala answers (now heavily downvoted) were horrible. I wasn't about to leave those for others to find. Once somebody links here with a specific q&a (free to copy this text), then I'll remove it. Until then, it still has utility, even in the wrong place.
    – Stephen
    Commented Feb 1, 2022 at 0:21
  • 1
    @maxxyme I agree with Stephen here. Programmers of Scala, Kotlin and other JVM-based languages would often search for how to do in Java and end up here. So supplementing the Java answers with in this case a Scala answer is helpful.
    – Anonymous
    Commented Apr 12, 2023 at 15:05
1

using this func

private static String strDuration(long duration) {
    int ms, s, m, h, d;
    double dec;
    double time = duration * 1.0;

    time = (time / 1000.0);
    dec = time % 1;
    time = time - dec;
    ms = (int)(dec * 1000);

    time = (time / 60.0);
    dec = time % 1;
    time = time - dec;
    s = (int)(dec * 60);

    time = (time / 60.0);
    dec = time % 1;
    time = time - dec;
    m = (int)(dec * 60);

    time = (time / 24.0);
    dec = time % 1;
    time = time - dec;
    h = (int)(dec * 24);
    
    d = (int)time;
    
    return (String.format("%d d - %02d:%02d:%02d.%03d", d, h, m, s, ms));
}
2
  • Go to github.com/ipserc/duration to get a packaged version of this function
    – ipserc
    Commented Jul 5, 2020 at 14:19
  • This was the code I was looking for, the accepted answer is great, but it lacks the days, which I needed
    – Filnor
    Commented Jul 22, 2020 at 17:54
0

Looking at all those calculations, it may is helpful that most of the Units (Hours, Minutes, etc.) have a .toFooPart() convenience method.

E.g.

Duration.ofMinutes(110L).toMinutesPart() == 50

Read: the minutes elapsed to the next value of the parent unit (Hour).

1
  • Doesn't answer the question, please stick to it.
    – maxxyme
    Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 12:44
-4

In Scala, building up on YourBestBet's solution but simplified:

def prettyDuration(seconds: Long): List[String] = seconds match {
  case t if t < 60      => List(s"${t} seconds")
  case t if t < 3600    => s"${t / 60} minutes" :: prettyDuration(t % 60)
  case t if t < 3600*24 => s"${t / 3600} hours" :: prettyDuration(t % 3600)
  case t                => s"${t / (3600*24)} days" :: prettyDuration(t % (3600*24))
}

val dur = prettyDuration(12345).mkString(", ") // => 3 hours, 25 minutes, 45 seconds
1
  • OP asked for a solution to format a duration in seconds in... Java
    – maxxyme
    Commented Dec 23, 2021 at 12:45
-5

in scala, no library needed:

def prettyDuration(str:List[String],seconds:Long):List[String]={
  seconds match {
    case t if t < 60 => str:::List(s"${t} seconds")
    case t if (t >= 60 && t< 3600 ) => List(s"${t / 60} minutes"):::prettyDuration(str, t%60)
    case t if (t >= 3600 && t< 3600*24 ) => List(s"${t / 3600} hours"):::prettyDuration(str, t%3600)
    case t if (t>= 3600*24 ) => List(s"${t / (3600*24)} days"):::prettyDuration(str, t%(3600*24))
  }
}
val dur = prettyDuration(List.empty[String], 12345).mkString("")
2
  • 5
    This isn't a great advert for Scala? No library needed, but just as much code... ?
    – Adam
    Commented Apr 23, 2018 at 14:17
  • I like the recursive approach, but it can be simplified a lot: stackoverflow.com/a/52992235/3594403
    – dpoetzsch
    Commented Oct 25, 2018 at 14:52

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