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I have used collections in my Jekyll website for GitHub Pages. I'm trying to get Jekyll to see the Markdown files inside the collection folder, _projects.

Here's a rundown of the file structure:

root
 │
 ├─ _projects
 │       │
 │       ├─ project_1.md
 │       └─ project_2.md
 │
 └─ /*Rest of the Jekyll folders and files, _posts, _includes, etc.*/

At the moment, I realized that you must put the Markdown files in the root, so Jekyll can be able to see and parse the files to display them when after you clicked a link that points to them via permalinks. But it cannot "see" the Markdown files if the files are not in the root folder, after testing quite a while.

Is there a way to let Jekyll see and parse files inside the subfolder, _projects, just like how it can see files in the root folder? Maybe I need to set something up in the _config.yml, I guess?

Thanks in advance.

  • 2
    To someone who downvoted, please tell me what's wrong with this post, or please provide feedback as to what you feel negative about. Thank you. – tom_mai78101 Nov 1 '14 at 4:36
1

The OP tom-mai78101 comments the the article "Jekyll Blog From a Subdirectory" from Hemanth.HM

has confirmed my guesses that subdirectories are only defined by the permalinks in the Markdown files, and not through the folders within the repository.
I quickly wrote a code snippet, and created a few Markdown files shown here, I am now able to create webpages using Markdown files nested within the _posts folder.
In short, there's no need to use collections in the _config.yml, and just use the default _posts.
It would've been better if there is a way to change the default permalink setup in the _config.yml.


The question "Jekyll not generating pages in subfolders" could be relevant, in order to make some pages being generated in a subfolder.

Or you could use a different baseurl. (Jekyll 1.0+)

Or use the _include folder (see "Jekyll paginate blog as subdirectory")


Or, The article "Running Your Jekyll Blog from a Subdirectory" (from Josh Branchaud) seems to address your situation:

Solution 1

Create a directory called blog in your public html directory (that is, in the directory that your domain points to). Assuming you are using some sort of deployment scheme (GitHub pages or deployment methods), you need to have that deployment scheme tell Jekyll to deploy to the blog directory instead of the directory it is currently using.

(in your case blog would be projects)

Solution 2

Start by creating a directory locally where you have your Jekyll blog setup.
This directory will sit along side _posts, _site, css, etc.
This is only going to hold non-post files such as index.html.
The blog posts will still go in the _posts directory
.

Next, we are going to tell Jekyll that we want it to take our blog posts and put them inside a directory called blog when it generates them.
This can be done by adding a permalink setting to the _config.yml file
.
Add a line like this to the top of the file:

permalink: /blog/:categories/:year/:month/:day/:title.html. 

The default (which you have probably been using) puts posts in a directory structure starting with the category, followed by the date, and finally with the title of the blog post as the name of the html file.
Which, spelled out would be

/:categories/:year/:month/:day/:title.html. 

Does that look familiar? Sure does. It is what we have used above, sans the /blog part.
We are essentially emulating the default directory structure and while adding our blog directory at the beginning.

Lastly, you are going to want to add an index.html file to the blog directory that you created.
This way, when a person goes to mydomain.com/blog/ they can see what blog posts you have to offer.
This index page is going to more or less mirror exactly what you had setup originally for listing your blog posts.

  • Same kind of solution (using permalink) h3manth.com/new/blog/2013/jekyll-blog-from-a-subdirectory – VonC Nov 1 '14 at 7:44
  • I was doing a bit of experimenting with the _posts for 6 hours, searching in Stack Overflow. I noticed that Markdown files will only be seen if the files are named accordingly with the structure: YYYY-MM-DD-TITLE.md. Adding these files into subdirectories of _posts would still allow the files to be seen by Jekyll, except for the fact that you must add your own permalink to each Markdown files. The user-defined permalinks in the Markdown files allow cleaner-looking URLs upon generating the webpages for each of them. Just as I was about to answer my own question, your answer pops up. – tom_mai78101 Nov 1 '14 at 7:50
  • I read through your commented link, and have confirmed my guesses that subdirectories are only defined by the permalinks in the Markdown files, and not through the folders within the repository. I quickly wrote a code snippet, and created a few Markdown files shown here, I am now able to create webpages using Markdown files nested within the _posts folder. In short, there's no need to use collections in the _config.yml, and just use the default _posts. It would've been better if there is a way to change the default permalink setup in the _config.yml. – tom_mai78101 Nov 1 '14 at 7:57
  • @tom_mai78101 I agree. I have included your comment in the answer for more visibility. – VonC Nov 1 '14 at 8:01
  • Thank you. If someone knows how to use collections and custom file name structures, like TITLE-YEAR.md or YEAR-TITLE-DAY.md, while still allowing Jekyll to see the Markdown files, whether they would be in _posts or in user-defined collections folder, it would be very helpful and could be added to the official Jekyll documentation. – tom_mai78101 Nov 1 '14 at 8:04
2

Edit : My first answer was completely wrong. I was talking

_config.yml

collections:
  project:
    output: true

_project/project_1.md

---
layout: project
title: project
---

## Yo!

Project in **strong** yo `inline code`

    some code
    yolo !

_layouts/project.html

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  {% include head.html %}
  <body>
    {% include header.html %}
    <div class="page-content">
      <div class="wrapper">
        {{ content }}
      </div>
    </div>
    {% include footer.html %}
  </body>
</html>

You now have a project/project_1.html page.

No need to use include: parameter in order to Jekyll to see collection folder or subfolder.

exclude: parameter can be used to ignore a subfolder in the collection.

End Edit


Old answer (nothing to do with collection)

Your _project folder is ignored by Jekyll, just like any underscored folder

To force Jekyll to parse files in this folder, in your _config.yml you can add :

include:
  - _project

jekyll build and all is good !

  • I thought underscored folders are for collections in the _config.yml file. If not, what is the official way of using collections in a folder, and how to put the files in, so that it corresponds to the {% for element in site.collection_name %}in Liquid for Jekyll? – tom_mai78101 Nov 1 '14 at 20:35
  • 1
    You are right, I'm completely wrong in my first answer. I was talking about pages not collections. I've edited my answer. – David Jacquel Nov 2 '14 at 16:26
  • I saw the edited section. It's now working! Felt good to actually understand another confusing part of Jekyll. I still feel the documentation needs to explain how to use collections with nested folders, so that Liquid parses them and knows what to generate. I could have a collection of posts within nested folders, like _project > someFolder > anotherFolder > project_1.md, and wouldn't know how to let Jekyll see project_1.md without help if the documentation didn't explain edge cases like this. – tom_mai78101 Nov 2 '14 at 19:27
  • Can't edit previous comments. I meant to say, in the _config.yml, when setting up collections. If the collections can see all nested folders when specifying the root folder of a collection, wouldn't that be equal to saying that you are including the folders? Or do you need to include the root folder, so that the collections can see the nested folders and posts in those subdirectories? – tom_mai78101 Nov 2 '14 at 19:47
  • 1
    Yes, everything contained in you collection folder and subfolders is seen. – David Jacquel Nov 3 '14 at 0:11

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