19

Example:

class Planet(Enum):

    MERCURY = (mass: 3.303e+23, radius: 2.4397e6)

    def __init__(self, mass, radius):
        self.mass = mass       # in kilograms
        self.radius = radius   # in meters

Ref: https://docs.python.org/3/library/enum.html#planet

Why do I want to do this? If there are a few primitive types (int, bool) in the constructor list, it would be nice to used named arguments.

25

While you can't use named arguments the way you describe with enums, you can get a similar effect with a namedtuple mixin:

from collections import namedtuple
from enum import Enum

Body = namedtuple("Body", ["mass", "radius"])

class Planet(Body, Enum):

    MERCURY = Body(mass=3.303e+23, radius=2.4397e6)
    VENUS   = Body(mass=4.869e+24, radius=6.0518e6)
    EARTH   = Body(mass=5.976e+24, radius=3.3972e6)
    # ... etc.

... which to my mind is cleaner, since you don't have to write an __init__ method.

Example use:

>>> Planet.MERCURY
<Planet.MERCURY: Body(mass=3.303e+23, radius=2439700.0)>
>>> Planet.EARTH.mass
5.976e+24
>>> Planet.VENUS.radius
6051800.0

Note that, as per the docs, "mix-in types must appear before Enum itself in the sequence of bases".

  • Very cool. I never considered solving the problem with a mixin. – kevinarpe Nov 5 '14 at 2:54
  • 2
    Ingenious. Have an up-vote. :) – Ethan Furman Mar 10 '16 at 0:49
  • @ZeroPiraeus: I added an answer, but not for the bounty -- just hoping for some up-votes (long way to go for my [python-3.x] gold badge! ;) . – Ethan Furman Mar 17 '17 at 7:13
10
+100

The accepted answer by @zero-piraeus can be slightly extended to allow default arguments as well. This is very handy when you have a large enum with most entries having the same value for an element.

class Body(namedtuple('Body', "mass radius moons")):
    def __new__(cls, mass, radius, moons=0):
        return super().__new__(cls, mass, radius, moons)
    def __getnewargs__(self):
        return (self.mass, self.radius, self.moons)

class Planet(Body, Enum):

    MERCURY = Body(mass=3.303e+23, radius=2.4397e6)
    VENUS   = Body(mass=4.869e+24, radius=6.0518e6)
    EARTH   = Body(5.976e+24, 3.3972e6, moons=1)

Beware pickling will not work without the __getnewargs__.

class Foo:
    def __init__(self):
        self.planet = Planet.EARTH  # pickle error in deepcopy

from copy import deepcopy

f1 = Foo()
f2 = deepcopy(f1)  # pickle error here
  • That's a nice tweak on the original idea, thanks! – Zero Piraeus Mar 16 '17 at 3:58
  • 1
    Good extension! Have an up-vote. :) – Ethan Furman Mar 17 '17 at 6:34
  • @zero-piraeus Thank you sir! – shao.lo Mar 23 '17 at 15:01
3

If going beyond the namedtuple mix-in check out the aenum library1. Besides having a few extra bells and whistles for Enum it also supports NamedConstant and a metaclass-based NamedTuple.

Using aenum.Enum the above code could look like:

from aenum import Enum, enum, _reduce_ex_by_name

class Planet(Enum, init='mass radius'):
    MERCURY = enum(mass=3.303e+23, radius=2.4397e6)
    VENUS   = enum(mass=4.869e+24, radius=6.0518e6)
    EARTH   = enum(mass=5.976e+24, radius=3.3972e6)
    # replace __reduce_ex__ so pickling works
    __reduce_ex__ = _reduce_ex_by_name

and in use:

--> for p in Planet:
...     print(repr(p))
<Planet.MERCURY: enum(radius=2439700.0, mass=3.3030000000000001e+23)>
<Planet.EARTH: enum(radius=3397200.0, mass=5.9760000000000004e+24)>
<Planet.VENUS: enum(radius=6051800.0, mass=4.8690000000000001e+24)>

--> print(Planet.VENUS.mass)
4.869e+24

1 Disclosure: I am the author of the Python stdlib Enum, the enum34 backport, and the Advanced Enumeration (aenum) library.

0

For Python 3.6.1+ the typing.NamedTuple can be used, which also allows for setting default values, which leads to prettier code. The example by @shao.lo then looks like this:

from enum import Enum
from typing import NamedTuple


class Body(NamedTuple):
    mass: float
    radius: float
    moons: int=0


class Planet(Body, Enum):
    MERCURY = Body(mass=3.303e+23, radius=2.4397e6)
    VENUS   = Body(mass=4.869e+24, radius=6.0518e6)
    EARTH   = Body(5.976e+24, 3.3972e6, moons=1)

This also supports pickling. The typing.Any can be used if you don't want to specify the type.

Credit to @monk-time, who's answer here inspired this solution.

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