10

How can I update/add element in the array?

var persons = {
    data: []
};

var bob = {name: 'Bob', age: 15};
var fill = {name: 'Fill', age: 20};
var mark = {name: 'Mark', age: 19};
var john = {name: 'John', age: 4};

persons['data'].push(bob);
persons['data'].push(fill);
persons['data'].push(mark);
persons['data'].push(john);

var updatedJohn = {name: 'John', age: 100};

if (!persons['data'][updatedJohn.name]){
    persons['data'].push(updatedJohn);
} else {
    persons['data'][updatedJohn.name] = updatedJohn; // this line doesn't work
}

I can't figure out how to update an element of the array if element John already exist.

UPDATE

jsFiddle example

2
  • What happens if two persons have the same name? – axelduch Nov 2 '14 at 14:30
  • In that case we need to update an existed person (John). This array is like a Set. – Alex Nov 2 '14 at 14:30
8

You will need a query function like the following to help you find indices according to a property in your database: (JSFiddle)

function findIndexByProperty(data, key, value) {
    for (var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
        if (data[i][key] == value) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

var johnIndex = findIndexByProperty(persons.data, 'name', 'John');
if (johnIndex > -1) {
    persons.data[johnIndex] = updatedJohn;
} else {
    persons.data.push(updatedJohn);
}

Note that this only returns the first record with name John. You will need to decide what you want it to do in the case of multiple such records - update all of them? This kind of problem is why databases usually have unique keys to identify records.

If using Underscore you already have a _.findIndex() function that can be used instead:

var johnIndex = _.findIndex(persons.data, { name: 'John' }); 
3

Why not use an associate array for persons['data'], because .push() just uses index arrays

var persons = {
   data: {}
};

...
persons['data'][john.name] = john;
...

var updatedJohn = {name: 'John', age: 100};

// if statement isn't neccesary no more bc
// if the index is there it will override it and if not
// it will create a new index
persons['data'][updatedJohn.name] = updatedJohn;

The line didn't work for you because the person array was indexed by integers persons['data'].push() instead of strings persons['data'][stringIndex]

7
  • Using "associative arrays" in javascript is a bad idea, since everyone expects arrays to be numerically indexed. Use objects if you want a key-value store. – max Nov 2 '14 at 14:53
  • 1
    @papirtiger I don't know who taught you that, but associate arrays (objects) are very useful in any language not just js. Why would i expect an array I created with associates keys to be numerical? – Jay Harris Nov 2 '14 at 15:00
  • Using objects in javascript is very useful, using string indexes on arrays in javascript violates the principle of least surprise. Thing is that if I use your code i will expect array[0] to be the first member and array[array.length - 1] the last. – max Nov 2 '14 at 15:10
  • 1
    @papirtiger that article was written in 2006. I can see y one would have that opinion, but js like php gives the developer more leeway. I put my answer in better context for you my friend. – Jay Harris Nov 2 '14 at 15:11
  • @papirtiger the answer was assuming .data is an empty object {} of course. I missed the [] in the question. either way I'm right lol – Jay Harris Nov 2 '14 at 15:14
1

You can make a lookup table for every existing person if it's not in it, you push it in persons.data and create a new entry in the lookup table, else you rewrite full the person object without breaking the value's reference given. (I wrote a comment to explain this part).

JSFiddle here

var persons = {
    data: []
};

var bob = {name: 'Bob', age: 15};
var fill = {name: 'Fill', age: 20};
var mark = {name: 'Mark', age: 19};
var john = {name: 'John', age: 4};

persons['data'].push(bob);
persons['data'].push(fill);
persons['data'].push(mark);
persons['data'].push(john);

var personsHash = {};

// store an external reference for each persons
for (var i = 0, l = persons.data.length; i < l; i++) {
    personsHash[persons.data[i].name] = persons.data[i];
}

var updatedJohn = {name: 'John', age: 100};

if (!personsHash[updatedJohn.name]){
    personsHash[updatedJohn.name] = updatedJohn;
    persons['data'].push(updatedJohn);
} else {
    var key;
    var person = personsHash[updatedJohn.name];
    // comment if you don't want a full rewrite but just an update of attributes
    /**/
    for (key in person) {
        delete person[key];
    }
    /**/
    for (key in updatedJohn) {
        if (updatedJohn.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
            person[key] = updatedJohn[key];
        }
    }
}
3
  • I don't need to add a brand new John if old John is exist. In that case I just need to replace the old John with new John. That's all. But your solution do add the new John object. – Alex Nov 2 '14 at 14:55
  • Yes it does only add if it does not exist. I just used a way that rewrites fully the old John, but never breaks the object's reference (by not using =) – axelduch Nov 2 '14 at 14:57
  • Oh yes my bad I did not target persons.data but persons, let me fix this – axelduch Nov 2 '14 at 15:54
1

Arrays in javascript are indexed by numbers (or at least should be).

persons['data'].push(bob);
persons['data'].push(fill);
persons['data'].push(mark);

Using persons[2] would give you {name: 'Mark', age: 19}.

While Javascript is so flexible that you can do as in @Sasa answer and use string indexes you may get kneecapped by other developers if you do since this is a VERY BAD PRACTICE.

[ADDED] Consider these examples of weird and unexpected behaviour:

var ary = [];
ary[0] = false;
ary['using string indexes in javascript arrays is stupid'] = true;
console.log('pop should return the last added element', ary.pop()); //  false - WTF?
console.log('lastIndexOf should be 1?', ary.lastIndexOf(true)); // -1 WTF?

Arrays in Javascript should be used as stacks. Think of a stack of cards, you either add (push) or take away cards (pull) but you don´t know which card is where (unless you´re cheating).

If you want a list of persons by name you would use an object to store persons:

persons.data = {};
persons['data']['Bob'] = bob;

Or alternatively you could filter the array to get values which match a predicate:

bob = persons.data.filter(function(person){
  return person["name"] === 'Bob';
})[0];

EDIT:

Example of a function that would create or find a person:

var persons = { data : [] }
persons.data.push({ name: 'Bob', age: 10 })

// returns the index of the newly added person
persons.addOrReplace = function(new_person, attr) {

    var attr = attr || 'name';
    var data = this.data;    
    for (var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
      if (data[i][attr] === new_person[attr]) {
        data[i] = new_person;
        return i;
      }
    }   
    return this.data.push(new_person);
}

persons.addOrReplace({ name: 'Bob', age: 11 });
console.log(persons.data.length); // 1
console.log(persons.data[0].age); // 11

persons.addOrReplace({ name: 'Joe', age: 11 });
console.log(persons.data.length); // 2
console.log(persons.data[persons.data.length -1].name); // Joe
6
  • The reason why this is very bad practice is that since you have object which are perfectly suited to dictionaries (key-value, also known as hashes or associative arrays) we expect arrays to be numerically indexed by the order of insertion. – max Nov 2 '14 at 14:40
  • If you use the filter method, then try to change the record using bob = updatedBob, the record inside persons.data won't get updated. – Stuart Nov 2 '14 at 14:40
  • @Stuart. You are wrong, the object is passed by reference. jsfiddle.net/4xp02cuu – max Nov 2 '14 at 15:01
  • You can change its individual properties, like bob.name = 'Bobby' but you can't replace the whole record using bob = updatedBob, which is what the OP was trying to do. jsfiddle.net/4xp02cuu/1 – Stuart Nov 2 '14 at 15:03
  • Added an example find or replace function. – max Nov 2 '14 at 16:00
1

Try iterating through the elements of the persons object, update the element if a member with the same name exists, if it doesn't, push a new element to the array. Use a new variable exists to check if the member existed.

Here is what you could do:

var persons = {
    data: []
};

var bob = {name: 'Bob', age: 15};
var fill = {name: 'Fill', age: 20};
var mark = {name: 'Mark', age: 19};
var john = {name: 'John', age: 4};

persons['data'].push(bob);
persons['data'].push(fill);
persons['data'].push(mark);
persons['data'].push(john);

var updatedJohn = {name: 'John', age: 100};

var exists = 0;

for (var i=0; i<persons['data'].length; i++) {
    if (persons['data'][i].name == updatedJohn.name) {
        persons['data'][i].age = updatedJohn.age;
        exists = 1;
    }
}

if (exists === 0)
    persons['data'].push(updatedJohn);

Here is you updated fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/t4kjgkcn/3/

2
  • @Stuart can you clarify? I tested it here and it worked for me: jsfiddle.net/95d9oLkq/1 – benomatis Nov 2 '14 at 14:52
  • try console.log(persons.data) - you have added a duplicate of updatedJohn to the database for each existing record that didn't have the name "John" – Stuart Nov 2 '14 at 14:55
0

function addOrUpdate(arr, comp, update) {
  if (arr) {
    var updated = false;
    arr.map(function(e, i) {
      var found = e[comp] == update[comp];
      if (found) {
        angular.extend(arr[i], update);
        updated = true;
      }
    });
    if (!updated) {
      arr.push(update);
    }
  }
}

//example

var a = [{
  id: 1,
  name: 'a'
}, {
  id: 2,
  name: 'b'
}, {
  id: 3,
  name: 'c'
}];

addOrUpdate(a, "id", {
  id: 4,
  name: 'e3333'
});
//looks for an elemnent with id=4, doesnt find, and adds it

addOrUpdate(a, "id", {
  id: 4,
  name: 'e5555'
});
//this time it will find and update the name

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