380

I have a DataFrame with four columns. I want to convert this DataFrame to a python dictionary. I want the elements of first column be keys and the elements of other columns in same row be values.

DataFrame:

    ID   A   B   C
0   p    1   3   2
1   q    4   3   2
2   r    4   0   9  

Output should be like this:

Dictionary:

{'p': [1,3,2], 'q': [4,3,2], 'r': [4,0,9]}
5
  • 6
    Dataframe.to_dict()?
    – Anzel
    Nov 3, 2014 at 14:48
  • 17
    Dataframe.to_dict() will make A,B,C the keys instead of p,q,r Nov 3, 2014 at 14:56
  • @jezrael how to get the following output? {2:{'p': [1,3]},2:{'q': [4,3]},9:{'r': [4,0]}} for the same dataset?
    – panda
    Apr 22, 2019 at 9:10
  • @jezrael column equivalents of the above question {'c':{'ID': 'A','B'}}
    – panda
    Apr 22, 2019 at 9:13
  • This question tackles one column only. stackoverflow.com/questions/18695605/…
    – S.Doe_Dude
    Feb 20, 2021 at 0:17

11 Answers 11

658

The to_dict() method sets the column names as dictionary keys so you'll need to reshape your DataFrame slightly. Setting the 'ID' column as the index and then transposing the DataFrame is one way to achieve this.

to_dict() also accepts an 'orient' argument which you'll need in order to output a list of values for each column. Otherwise, a dictionary of the form {index: value} will be returned for each column.

These steps can be done with the following line:

>>> df.set_index('ID').T.to_dict('list')
{'p': [1, 3, 2], 'q': [4, 3, 2], 'r': [4, 0, 9]}

In case a different dictionary format is needed, here are examples of the possible orient arguments. Consider the following simple DataFrame:

>>> df = pd.DataFrame({'a': ['red', 'yellow', 'blue'], 'b': [0.5, 0.25, 0.125]})
>>> df
        a      b
0     red  0.500
1  yellow  0.250
2    blue  0.125

Then the options are as follows.

dict - the default: column names are keys, values are dictionaries of index:data pairs

>>> df.to_dict('dict')
{'a': {0: 'red', 1: 'yellow', 2: 'blue'}, 
 'b': {0: 0.5, 1: 0.25, 2: 0.125}}

list - keys are column names, values are lists of column data

>>> df.to_dict('list')
{'a': ['red', 'yellow', 'blue'], 
 'b': [0.5, 0.25, 0.125]}

series - like 'list', but values are Series

>>> df.to_dict('series')
{'a': 0       red
      1    yellow
      2      blue
      Name: a, dtype: object, 

 'b': 0    0.500
      1    0.250
      2    0.125
      Name: b, dtype: float64}

split - splits columns/data/index as keys with values being column names, data values by row and index labels respectively

>>> df.to_dict('split')
{'columns': ['a', 'b'],
 'data': [['red', 0.5], ['yellow', 0.25], ['blue', 0.125]],
 'index': [0, 1, 2]}

records - each row becomes a dictionary where key is column name and value is the data in the cell

>>> df.to_dict('records')
[{'a': 'red', 'b': 0.5}, 
 {'a': 'yellow', 'b': 0.25}, 
 {'a': 'blue', 'b': 0.125}]

index - like 'records', but a dictionary of dictionaries with keys as index labels (rather than a list)

>>> df.to_dict('index')
{0: {'a': 'red', 'b': 0.5},
 1: {'a': 'yellow', 'b': 0.25},
 2: {'a': 'blue', 'b': 0.125}}
5
  • 28
    this will be one liner: df.set_index('ID').T.to_dict('list')
    – Anzel
    Nov 3, 2014 at 14:58
  • 1
    For one record in Data Frame. df.T.to_dict()[0] Jun 19, 2019 at 9:10
  • 2
    df.to_dict('records') is how most modern software would want a dict that matches a json like pattern Aug 25, 2020 at 22:32
  • yet here someone needs a alternation of 'index' method, one where its value of the dictionary is a pd.Series, meaning just breaking down the dataframe to a dictionaries of series, which can be achieved using dict(list(df.iterrows())) Enjoy! Oct 10, 2022 at 14:43
  • sorry if this is a silly question, is there a best one for sharing (e.g. in giving an excerpt for a SE question)? Or is is there a 'best practice' for choosing which to use? thanks Dec 5, 2022 at 15:22
142

Should a dictionary like:

{'red': '0.500', 'yellow': '0.250', 'blue': '0.125'}

be required out of a dataframe like:

        a      b
0     red  0.500
1  yellow  0.250
2    blue  0.125

simplest way would be to do:

dict(df.values)

working snippet below:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({'a': ['red', 'yellow', 'blue'], 'b': [0.5, 0.25, 0.125]})
dict(df.values)
1
  • 12
    Neat ! It only works for two-columns dataframes, though. Feb 2, 2021 at 14:32
34

Follow these steps:

Suppose your dataframe is as follows:

>>> df
   A  B  C ID
0  1  3  2  p
1  4  3  2  q
2  4  0  9  r

1. Use set_index to set ID columns as the dataframe index.

    df.set_index("ID", drop=True, inplace=True)

2. Use the orient=index parameter to have the index as dictionary keys.

    dictionary = df.to_dict(orient="index")

The results will be as follows:

    >>> dictionary
    {'q': {'A': 4, 'B': 3, 'D': 2}, 'p': {'A': 1, 'B': 3, 'D': 2}, 'r': {'A': 4, 'B': 0, 'D': 9}}

3. If you need to have each sample as a list run the following code. Determine the column order

column_order= ["A", "B", "C"] #  Determine your preferred order of columns
d = {} #  Initialize the new dictionary as an empty dictionary
for k in dictionary:
    d[k] = [dictionary[k][column_name] for column_name in column_order]
2
  • 2
    For the last bit seems you'd be simpler off using a dict comprehension to replace the for loop + list comprehension (3 lines -> 1). Either way, although it's nice to have options, the top answer is a lot shorter. Nov 11, 2016 at 1:02
  • This on is handy because it explains clearly how to use a specific column or header as the index. Feb 4, 2020 at 5:34
32

Try to use Zip

df = pd.read_csv("file")
d= dict([(i,[a,b,c ]) for i, a,b,c in zip(df.ID, df.A,df.B,df.C)])
print d

Output:

{'p': [1, 3, 2], 'q': [4, 3, 2], 'r': [4, 0, 9]}
13

If you don't mind the dictionary values being tuples, you can use itertuples:

>>> {x[0]: x[1:] for x in df.itertuples(index=False)}
{'p': (1, 3, 2), 'q': (4, 3, 2), 'r': (4, 0, 9)}
6

For my use (node names with xy positions) I found @user4179775's answer to the most helpful / intuitive:

import pandas as pd

df = pd.read_csv('glycolysis_nodes_xy.tsv', sep='\t')

df.head()
    nodes    x    y
0  c00033  146  958
1  c00031  601  195
...

xy_dict_list=dict([(i,[a,b]) for i, a,b in zip(df.nodes, df.x,df.y)])

xy_dict_list
{'c00022': [483, 868],
 'c00024': [146, 868],
 ... }

xy_dict_tuples=dict([(i,(a,b)) for i, a,b in zip(df.nodes, df.x,df.y)])

xy_dict_tuples
{'c00022': (483, 868),
 'c00024': (146, 868),
 ... }

Addendum

I later returned to this issue, for other, but related, work. Here is an approach that more closely mirrors the [excellent] accepted answer.

node_df = pd.read_csv('node_prop-glycolysis_tca-from_pg.tsv', sep='\t')

node_df.head()
   node  kegg_id kegg_cid            name  wt  vis
0  22    22       c00022   pyruvate        1   1
1  24    24       c00024   acetyl-CoA      1   1
...

Convert Pandas dataframe to a [list], {dict}, {dict of {dict}}, ...

Per accepted answer:

node_df.set_index('kegg_cid').T.to_dict('list')

{'c00022': [22, 22, 'pyruvate', 1, 1],
 'c00024': [24, 24, 'acetyl-CoA', 1, 1],
 ... }

node_df.set_index('kegg_cid').T.to_dict('dict')

{'c00022': {'kegg_id': 22, 'name': 'pyruvate', 'node': 22, 'vis': 1, 'wt': 1},
 'c00024': {'kegg_id': 24, 'name': 'acetyl-CoA', 'node': 24, 'vis': 1, 'wt': 1},
 ... }

In my case, I wanted to do the same thing but with selected columns from the Pandas dataframe, so I needed to slice the columns. There are two approaches.

  1. Directly:

(see: Convert pandas to dictionary defining the columns used fo the key values)

node_df.set_index('kegg_cid')[['name', 'wt', 'vis']].T.to_dict('dict')

{'c00022': {'name': 'pyruvate', 'vis': 1, 'wt': 1},
 'c00024': {'name': 'acetyl-CoA', 'vis': 1, 'wt': 1},
 ... }
  1. "Indirectly:" first, slice the desired columns/data from the Pandas dataframe (again, two approaches),
node_df_sliced = node_df[['kegg_cid', 'name', 'wt', 'vis']]

or

node_df_sliced2 = node_df.loc[:, ['kegg_cid', 'name', 'wt', 'vis']]

that can then can be used to create a dictionary of dictionaries

node_df_sliced.set_index('kegg_cid').T.to_dict('dict')

{'c00022': {'name': 'pyruvate', 'vis': 1, 'wt': 1},
 'c00024': {'name': 'acetyl-CoA', 'vis': 1, 'wt': 1},
 ... }
1
  • 1
    The issue with this approach is that the Dataframe columns must be unique or they'll be omitted. Example would be if you have c00022 for more than one row. Sep 28, 2021 at 15:23
4

Most of the answers do not deal with the situation where ID can exist multiple times in the dataframe. In case ID can be duplicated in the Dataframe df you want to use a list to store the values (a.k.a a list of lists), grouped by ID:

{k: [g['A'].tolist(), g['B'].tolist(), g['C'].tolist()] for k,g in df.groupby('ID')}
2

Dictionary comprehension & iterrows() method could also be used to get the desired output.

result = {row.ID: [row.A, row.B, row.C] for (index, row) in df.iterrows()}
1
df = pd.DataFrame([['p',1,3,2], ['q',4,3,2], ['r',4,0,9]], columns=['ID','A','B','C'])
my_dict = {k:list(v) for k,v in zip(df['ID'], df.drop(columns='ID').values)}
print(my_dict)

with output

{'p': [1, 3, 2], 'q': [4, 3, 2], 'r': [4, 0, 9]}
0

With this method, columns of dataframe will be the keys and series of dataframe will be the values.`

data_dict = dict()
for col in dataframe.columns:
    data_dict[col] = dataframe[col].values.tolist()
-1

DataFrame.to_dict() converts DataFrame to dictionary.

Example

>>> df = pd.DataFrame(
    {'col1': [1, 2], 'col2': [0.5, 0.75]}, index=['a', 'b'])
>>> df
   col1  col2
a     1   0.1
b     2   0.2
>>> df.to_dict()
{'col1': {'a': 1, 'b': 2}, 'col2': {'a': 0.5, 'b': 0.75}}

See this Documentation for details

1
  • 2
    Yes, but the OP explicitl stated they want the row indexes to be the keys, not the column labels.
    – Vicki B
    Aug 3, 2019 at 16:13

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