6

For the below piece of code I have in one of my test classes, Sonar throws me a critical violation - Correctness - Nullcheck of value previously dereferenced

 if (testLst != null && !testLst.isEmpty()) {
        for (Test test : testLst) {
            if (test.getName().equalsIgnoreCase("TEST")) {
            // do blah
            }

Can someone throw some light on this on what am I doing wrong here?

EDIT: One of the answers here suggested this is because I could have accessed the variable before, and so the null check is redundant. That's not true though. Here is the line of code before my null check.

 testLst = myTest.getValues(); //I am basically populating the array by doing a get, but I am not accessing the list itself by doing a get on it directly - like testLst.get()
 if (testLst != null && !testLst.isEmpty()) {
            for (Test test : testLst) {
                if (test.getName().equalsIgnoreCase("TEST")) {
                // do blah
                }
5
  • 1
    please post more code, what's above what you did post?
    – user180100
    Nov 3 '14 at 20:27
  • see also dev.eclipse.org/sonar/rules/show/…
    – user180100
    Nov 3 '14 at 20:28
  • RC. is right: we need to see the code that precedes this code, up to the beginning of the method or the declaration of testList; which ever is closest to this snippet.
    – Dancrumb
    Nov 3 '14 at 20:37
  • This is the only code I have in my method. Nothing before that. Nov 3 '14 at 20:50
  • 4
    sorry if I am too late to the party but what I have noticed when having this problem today is that sonar actually highlights the line that would cause the first NPE not the line where you are doing the redundant null check. In my case the redundant null check was further down the code.
    – Ben
    Feb 23 '15 at 6:52
13

This message is shown when you're checking if a variable's value is null (in this case testLst) whereas you already accessed the variable before. The null check is not needed since if the value was null, a NullPointerException would have been thrown.

Example:

testLst.remove(something);
if (testLst != null && !testLst.isEmpty()) {
    for (Test test : testLst) {
       if (test.getName().equalsIgnoreCase("TEST")) {
        // do blah
        }

The check testLst != null is redundant since at the time the program reaches the if statement, testLst cannot be null, otherwise the previous statement testLst.remove(something) would have thrown a NullPointerException. In this case, you should place the null check before accessing testLst, in a place where it can be null:

if(testLst != null) {
   testLst.remove(something);
   if (!testLst.isEmpty()) {
       for (Test test : testLst) {
          if (test.getName().equalsIgnoreCase("TEST")) {
           // do blah
          }
5
  • 1
    Sorry I don't understand.You are very close to what the sonar documentation for the error says. This part is not clear to me - This message is shown when you're checking if a variable's value is null (in this case testLst) whereas you already accessed the variable before.Can you explain in detail so I can accept your answer? Nov 3 '14 at 20:29
  • 1
    I accepted the answer, but what you say here doesn't apply in my case. Nov 3 '14 at 20:43
  • 1
    Could you post some of the code that exists before the if statement? There should be a place where a variable is being dereferenced and then its value is checked for null...
    – M A
    Nov 3 '14 at 20:45
  • 1
    I just did. Please take a look at my edit. I only have that one line above my method. And that's it. Nothing before that. Nov 3 '14 at 20:46
  • That's pretty weird. If this is really the case, then it's just a false detection.
    – M A
    Nov 3 '14 at 20:50
1

I know I am too late for OP but maybe someone else might find this helpful:

Sonarqube throws this error at the line, that would cause the initial NPE, not the line that includes the redundant null check (the error message indicates otherwise)

For OP:

testLst = myTest.getValues();

I am guessing getValues() neverer returns null therefore the testLst cannot be null but only empty at the point of the null check.

-1
testLst = myTest.getValues(); //I am basically populating the array by doing a get, but I am not accessing the list itself by doing a get on it directly - like testLst.get()
if (testLst != null && !testLst.isEmpty()) {
    for (Test test : testLst) {
        if (test.getName().equalsIgnoreCase("TEST")) {
        // do blah
        }

Did you checked myTest != null ? Otherwise sonar will throw the critical violation I guess.

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