10

I wanna print variable value without specifying its type.

In c, I can do

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int i = 1;
    float f = 0.1;
    char s[] = "s";

    printf("%i\n", i);
    printf("%f\n", f);
    printf("%s", s);
    return 0;
}

but I expect:

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int i = 1;
    float f = 0.1;
    char s[] = "s";

    printf("%any_type\n", i);
    printf("%any_type\n", f);
    printf("%any_type", s);
    return 0;
}

question: is there %any_type in C?

13

In C11 you can write a generic function to print any type and keep adding your custom type to that function.

#define print_any(X) _Generic((X), int: print_int, \
                              default: print_unknown, \
                              float: print_float)(X)

int print_int(int i)
{
  return printf("%d\n", i);
}

int print_float(float f)
{
  return printf("%f\n", f);
}

int print_unknown(...)
{
  return printf("ERROR: Unknown type\n");
}

You can also automate the function generation as shown below.

#define GEN_PRINT(TYPE, SPECIFIER_STR) int print_##TYPE(TYPE x) { return printf(SPECIFIER_STR "\n", x);}
GEN_PRINT(int, "%d");
GEN_PRINT(char, "%c");
GEN_PRINT(float, "%f");

Usage will be:

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int i = 1;
    float f = 0.1;
    char s[] = "s";

    print_any(i);
    print_any(f);
    print_any(s);
    return 0;
}
5
  • for love of Moses, bring a sample or talk about it more. :'( Nov 4 '14 at 5:37
  • more info on this one here
    – M.M
    Nov 4 '14 at 5:43
  • 1
    @KickButtowski Added little info. Thanks Matt. Nov 4 '14 at 5:45
  • I don't like this. It's too easy to forget exactly what you're writing. This is bad for numerous reasons, and you could generate crashes. In particular, this fails at runtime, whereas using regular printf is safer because it will fail at compile time under many compilers.
    – SevenBits
    Nov 5 '14 at 3:20
  • @SevenBits I did not quite get your point. Can you please elaborate what is easy to forget? If you think it is easy to forget some type, consider adding something that fails 1/0 for example in print_unknown for debug mode of compilation. This way if you forget a case, you will encounter failure and handle it separately. printf is variadic function, so compiler is free to generate or not to generate warning if percentage specifiers don't match with the arguments. Nov 5 '14 at 5:06
10

No, you have to give the correct format specifier.

In C11 you can automate the computation of the correct format specifier by using a _Generic combined with a macro. However, you have to repeat the name of the variable (once to compute the specifier, and once to give the variable as argument).

For more details read this link.

5
  • This was posted as an answer, but it does not attempt to answer the question. It should possibly be an edit, a comment, another question, or deleted altogether. Nov 4 '14 at 5:33
  • @KickButtowski - This is the answer to 'question: is there %any_type in c?' i.e. No.
    – Ed Heal
    Nov 4 '14 at 5:34
  • God forbid I post such answer. at least, the post can be informative. try to explain how to format and what are the options... Put more info will not kill anybody Nov 4 '14 at 5:36
  • @KickButtowski - Apart for the religious stuff in the previous comments surely the person can google the manual page.
    – Ed Heal
    Nov 4 '14 at 5:38
  • @KickButtowski if you don't like this answer then post your own answer. Also it seems to me that there is nothing more to say here. "how to format" has nothing to do with the question which OP asked. His code indicates that he already knows how to format.
    – M.M
    Nov 4 '14 at 5:40
5

No, printf is a so called variadic function, which means it can take any number/type of parameters.

The problem (well, one of them) with variadic functions in classic C is that the parameters are not type safe, that is - the called function has no idea of the type of the parameters.

That's the reason the variables are typed using the format string to begin with, printf has no idea whether a passed value is a pointer, an integer or some other type, and need to look at the format string to figure out in what format to display the value.

That sadly also opens up the possibility of bugs, if the format string is wrong, for example saying that a value is a pointer to something when it's really an integer, the program may crash (or more specifically, cause undefined behaviour) from trying to access a non pointer value as a pointer.

1
1

There is no such kind of things. We have to tell at which format we are going to print that value.

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